Phosphorus for plants?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by itistimenow, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. itistimenow

    itistimenow Junior Member

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    What is the best source of a natural phosphorus fertilizer for plants?
    Ta :)
     
  2. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Bird poo. Bat poo.
     
  3. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Borage as green manure.
     
  4. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    Most manures are pretty high in p. Using lots of horse shit pushed mine sky-high!
     
  5. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    Yep, bat poo, bird poo are great source of available Phos.

    I also like Soft Rock Phos.
    highly available to plants, easy to apply, good range of other minerals particularly Ca
    and doesnt bind up with Ca and become unavailable like acid treated hard rock phos. (Superphosphate) once it's applied to the soil.

    a quick fix foliar spray that's readily available is to use a well known carbonated cola drink (Phosphoric acid, carbonic acid, sugar all good plant and microbe foods)
    Mix it 2-4 parts water, a bit of seaweed (for the minerals, fulvic acids and all the other usual goodies)
    and a dash of household ammonia if you can find it ( not cloudy- has detergent mixed with it) of a bit of N and to raise pH a bit.
    Id rather use it as a foliar fert. than as a drink :D
     
  6. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Barley increases the amount of phosphorous available in the crop that follows it.
     
  7. Finchj

    Finchj Junior Member

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    I'm working on finding birds that migrate through our area in the fall/spring. I think that if we can put in place a cover crop specifically designed for birds we might see some benefits.
     
  8. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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  9. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    The famous bio-dynamic farmer, John Priestley makes a compost tea from wild tobacco (Solanum mauritianum) that he says helps to unlock phosphorus in the soil. He is a clever guy and a very observant farmer.
     
  10. Dzionik

    Dzionik Junior Member

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    Any more information on this Matto?
     
  11. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    This is all I got from an article I saw in the library. Ill double check next time im there. It may well just be an observed thing, you know... biodynamic farmers and everything....lol
    Actually John comes highly regarded, some say he's Australia's best farmer, so he knows a thing or two.
     
  12. Dzionik

    Dzionik Junior Member

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  13. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    I don't know exactly how or why it works, but biodynamics is demonstrably, repeatedly and consistently effective:clap:
     
  14. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Buckwheat also makes potassium and phosphorus available when turned into green manure.
     
  15. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    It may be that Biodynamics is able to increase the biological activity/life/bugs that in turn we now know make most food/chemicals/NPK available to plants
    It may look a bit magical but i wonder if the poo in cow horn thing is doing just that increasing soil life.
     
  16. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    I spent today working with a Biodynamic's mob in Bellingen and with Hugh Lovell, international Biodynamic dude. I asked him about his thoughts on the Wild Tobacco tree. He explained that the flowering quality of the plant, and all plants, showed that it was expressing connection with phosphorus. the little furryness on the leaves were good indicators as well as the flowering. We could see a cassia in bloom as well and he explained that even though it was a legume, the enzymes and the actinomycetes exudating from the roots would be solublising phosphorus around the rhizosphere.
    Now we know that weeds are plants telling a secret about their success in growing in that particular area. The tobacco bush would be using its ability to use the limited phosphorus on that site to repair it. So creating a tea and fermenting the bush over a few months will concentrate its dynamic effect and when you spread it out, will charge the new area with its essence, that is, to make phosphorus available. Like valerian, also a flower that potentises phosphorus exchange and has a warming effect.
    Biodynamic teas are usually prepared by fermenting in a barrel and adding the compost preps 502-507 to potentise and bring all the elements into the tea. Hugh explained they have used this to spray back over troublesome weeds, using whatever the weed was for the tea, and have varying degrees of success in stopping that plant come back. It is because they have completed the job the weed was doing by spraying back a concentrated and potentised dose of the weed's essense.
    Does that make any sense? It did at the time, maybe that was the spell biodynamics has on new converts... kidding.
    Great stuff, especially Hughs observations on plants. even ones he doesnt know he can look at the pattern of the leaves, the characteristics of the plant and kind of find its niche in what element its working in, like Earth, Wind, etc and also what nutrient it is using or relying on.
    He reckons garlic is working with silica so sugar cane mulch(non toxic), bamboo or casaurina leaf mulch are the best for this plant. Its a great way to observe plants.
    How to make BD weed tea https://cityfoodgrowers.com.au/bioweedtea.php
     

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