Personally I find this --sustainable-- idea revolting but . . .

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by Michaelangelica, Mar 1, 2010.

  1. springtide

    springtide Junior Member

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    And here they are signing petitions to ban the sale of horse meat..... go figure.
     
  2. DonHansford

    DonHansford Junior Member

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    Perhaps we pick a class of humans that add weight relatively easily, feed the insects to them, then eat THEM!

    Solves the obesity problem, cuts the number of plague locusts available for breeding, solves the protein crisis, and helps ease overcrowding on the only planet we've got!

    Win, win, win! :rofl:
     
  3. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    Long Pork

    I think that most human meat wouldn't be fit for human consumption.
    not on moral or ethical grounds, but for health reasons,
    I mean, have you seen the shit that some of them eat?
    accumulation of toxins, heavy metals etc.
    I wouldn't eat that unless I was really desperate :shake:
    :D
     
  4. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    Woah! This thread is taking a scary turn! lol
     
  5. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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  6. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    why? the korean jelly acorn dish is sensational ! some acorns are sweeter than others
    has anyone got any silkworms??
     
  7. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    I don't have a problem with acorns.
    They don't have legs

    the use of acorns as a human food began declining in the early 1600's as oak forests were cleared for annual crop production-in particular, for corn. Nowadays, almost four billion bushels of corn are harvested in this country every year, while only a handful of Native Americans and wild-food enthusiasts take advantage of the free-for-the-gathering acorn bounty. It seems a shame that the food which once served as the staff of life to human cultures is now widely disregarded.


    Unfortunately, when the costs and benefits of growing corn and acorns are compared, it becomes apparent that the changeover has not been much of a bargain. As a perennial tree crop, acorns can be grown year after year without cultivation, fertilization, irrigation, or-in most cases-spraying for pests. The oak also has the ability to yield well on marginal land, including steep, erosion-prone hillsides. Acorn production has other benefits, as well. The trees contribute to soil deposition, provide increased rainfall retention for replenishing the groundwater supply, act as windbreaks, supply summer shade, and furnish harvests of hardwood lumber and firewood and-in the case of one oak (Quercus suber)—cork. What's more, the tannin present in many acorn varieties is a sought-after commercial product.

    Read more: https://www.motherearthnews.com/Mod...-Grain-That-Grows-on-Trees.aspx#ixzz1PMCLZDuu
    https://www.motherearthnews.com/Organic-Gardening/2003-10-01/Oaks-Acorns-and-You.aspx
    https://www.thepeoplespaths.net/NAIFood/acorns.htm
     
  8. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    Oaks

    I love oaks!
    ...and dont forget, the edible mushrooms that oaks play host to...
    I'm trialing as many oak species as I can suitable for my climate.

    re. human food.
    In Spain 'bellotas' are still eaten ....
    Quercus rotundifoliawas for a long time considdered a variety of Q.ilex.
    https://oaks.of.the.world.free.fr/quercus_rotundifolia.htm
    https://oaks.of.the.world.free.fr/quercus_ilex.htm
    I've so far been unable to locate it in Aus., but I'm growing Q.ilex anyway.
    selecting acorns from heavy bearing trees, especially if low in tannin (I taste them to check).
    I'll convert acorns to pork (the real stuff:)) later when they start bearing heavily.

    The large cupules of Valonea oak (Q.ithaburensis var.macrolepis, syn. Q.macrolepis) was traded as a source of tannin in the eastern Mediteranean.
    Acorns are low in tannin and also a good fodder.
    https://oaks.of.the.world.free.fr/quercus_ithaburensis.htm
    It can be found growing in various locations in sthn. Aust.

    the subject of oaks deserves it's own thread
    so, back on topic....

    re.Cicadas.
    I used to catch and eat cicadas when I was a kid :rofl:
    people thought I was a weird kid...
     
  9. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    You can buy Truffle inoculated trees now.

    Good idea to start another thread Pls do so, maybe we could move some of these posts there
     
  10. Mike_E_from_NZ

    Mike_E_from_NZ Junior Member

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    I think this is a wonderful idea. Having said that, I haven't got my head around actually eating the things.

    Before I do, and start liking them:

    How would I catch enough of the tasty ones to make it worth while? Is there a cicada trap?

    Do I have to purge them before I eat them (like snails)?
     
  11. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    My problem too Mike
     
  12. Mike_E_from_NZ

    Mike_E_from_NZ Junior Member

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    Now, for a limited time:
    Learn how to leap over the next environmental catastrophe: 'Peak Protein'.
    A weekend seminar where you will learn how to prepare and eat grasshoppers, cicadas and huhu grubs.
    Your host Michaelangelica will demonstrate .....
     
  13. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    peak protein is on its way as industrial ag runs out of N, ive always considered this more urgent than peak oil
    MA: a bit of cement may assist your sqeamishness
     
  14. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    You guys are cruel
     
  15. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    And after a long hard day of tucking into alternative protein sources MA will round it all out with a lovely choko flummery.
     
  16. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    haha,I cant wait
     
  17. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Grasshopper tacos and cicada ice cream create buzz
    Relaxnews
    Saturday, 11 June 2011
    [​IMG]
    Restaurateurs in the US have been spreading their wings recently, selling insect-inspired food items like grasshopper tacos and cicada ice items like grasshopper tacos and cicada ice cream.

    In both cases, however, public health officials have been bugging out, ordering a San Francisco Mexican restaurant and ice creamery in Missouri to stop selling their fried and candied critters.

    According to a report from a local TV station in San Francisco, La Oaxaquena Bakery and Restaurant had been selling deep-fried grasshopper tacos, a regional specialty of Mexico's Oaxaca region, until health inspectors ordered restaurant owner Harry Persaud to stop.

    At issue was Persaud's attempts at authenticity: he sourced his grasshoppers straight from Oaxaca and there are no domestic purveyors of consumable grasshoppers with federal approval, reported ABC in San Francisco.

    Patrons described the dish as resembling crunchy ‘McNuggets' and chips, with a "hint of chicken taste."

    Meanwhile, earlier this month employees at an ice creamery in Columbia, Missouri decided to launch a full-scale attack on buzzing cicadas - a relative of spittlebugs and leafhoppers - by collecting the winged, bug-eyed critters from their backyards, boiling them, and coating them in brown sugar, reports The Atlantic Wire. The candied cicadas were then added to an ice cream base of brown sugar and butter.

    Within hours of its launch June 1, the ice cream sold out.
    https://www.independent.co.uk/life-...and-cicada-ice-cream-create-buzz-2296492.html
     
  18. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    can you eat azolla>?
     
  19. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Fresh, Farm-Raised Grasshoppers

    Fresh, Farm-Raised Grasshoppers
    An estimated 80 percent of the world’s population considers insects a commonplace food source, and soon—as eating meat becomes increasingly costly to wallets and the environment—bugs may hit Western dinner tables, too.

    In the Netherlands, the company Bugs Originals recently developed pesto-flavored bug nuggets and chocolate-covered muesli bars made from crushed mealworms, the larvae of the darkling beetle, reports Daniel Fromson for The Atlantic. Bugs Originals has also been successful in selling freeze-dried locusts and mealworms to local outlets. Fromson writes:

    The company’s goal is to get consumers to embrace bugs as an eco-friendly alternative to conventional meat.
    With worldwide demand for meat expected to nearly double by 2050, farm-raised crickets, locusts, and mealworms could provide comparable nutrition while using fewer natural resources than poultry or livestock. Crickets, for example, convert feed to body mass about twice as efficiently as pigs and five times as efficiently as cattle. Insects require less land and water—and measured per kilogram of edible mass, mealworms generate 10 to 100 times less greenhouse gas than pigs.

    Here in the states, in an innovation and entrepreneurship competition this spring, the University of Chicago awarded $10,000 to student-conceived Entom Foods, reports Carrie Golus in The Core. The team, which won with their well-received grasshopper cookies, plans to start a for-profit business that produces insect meat as a sustainable food source. But implementation will require clearing some hurdles, Golus says:

    Read more: https://www.utne.com/The-Sweet-Purs...h-Farm-Raised-Grasshoppers.aspx#ixzz1YMRkp8ZX



    Read more at: https://www.utne.com/The-Sweet-Purs...h-Farm-Raised-Grasshoppers.aspx#ixzz1YMRElasE
    [​IMG]

    Azolla- Wiki
    In addition to its traditional cultivation as a bio-fertilizer for wetland paddy (due to its ability to fix nitrogen), azolla is finding increasing use for sustainable production of livestock feed.[15] Azolla is rich in proteins, essential amino acids, vitamins and minerals. Studies describe feeding azolla to dairy cattle, pigs, ducks, and chickens, with reported increases in milk production, weight of broiler chickens and egg production of layers, as compared to conventional feed. One FAO study describes how azolla integrates into a tropical biomass agricultural system, reducing the need for inputs.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azolla#Human_Use
     
  20. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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