permaculture pilgramage

Discussion in 'Jobs, projects, courses, training, WWOOFing, volun' started by andrew curr, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    I can't say. Haha.

    Dayboro, actually. Bordering private property, the fence is actually in the buttress roots. I can just imagine the giants that were chopped and burnt to have left this as the last one.
     
  2. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    It is a monster. It eats other trees alive. I have photos.
     
  3. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    i have several large trees

    some i suspect could be the largest of their kind
    eucaliptus conica
    allocasurina leauminnii
    querqus rubra
    querqus robor 1920 ?
    i would love someone to photograph them and post them:handshake:
     
  4. annette

    annette Junior Member

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    Hmmmmm is that tree along Terrors Creek SOP?
     
  5. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    North Pine River. That part of the world though.
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    National Big Tree Register. Instructions on how to measure and score. Check the list and hopefully the same species have been submitted, you could compare. Surely you have some sort of camera?
     
  7. cottager

    cottager Junior Member

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    Hey again Andrew.

    I haven't visited the big old tree yet, but I've found something you might like!

    It's a different form of weeping oak, this one I found, just by a happy accident today, which I found growing on a light organic layer over dirty sand "topsoil" over chromosol (both brown/yellow/stony clay) at about 700mm (ish, I didn't dig, but I've dug on similar soil about 500 metres away) ... fairly neutral pH, low to moderate soil fertility. Anyway ...

    This oak is an oddball, it weeps, is also likely to be an English oak, but is quite tall (I'm guestimating it's around 50, with a few decades error lol), but it branched a lot lower than the oaks I've met. Nice tree, very vigorous (evidence of "pruning" cuts growing multiple growths).

    I had a lot of trouble finding acorns (evidence of bush rat scats, which would explain the lack of acorns!), but I found three (well, actually four, but my girl wants one to grow). They are funny acorns, all pointy at one end (never seen an acorn like it) ... look reminiscent of cartoon teardrops, only longer.

    So I've saved you the three acorns (they look/feel viable), a couple of leaves to help you identify it, an a cap from an acorn I didn't find. Want them? If so, let me know where to send them.

    Cheers,
    cottager
     
  8. cottager

    cottager Junior Member

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    Ooooh! Learn something new every day! I couldn't figure out why this oak tree was in full leaf, when it should have been "nude" ... remembering the wide leaves and the oddly elongated acorns, I had to find out what it is ... and it looks like a variety of live oak, which are everygreen! Cool :)

    Apparently, due to their low-branching and arched branches, they were popular for ship building. Nice!

    According to my daughter, they also make excellent climbing trees :D
     
  9. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    thanks for the acorns cottager ive moistened them an put em in the fridge
    good luck with mornington permaculture what a swell place to doo it
    Tasman is near by housesitting he should go he has some good skills ill see if i can track him down
     
  10. cottager

    cottager Junior Member

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    You're welcome Andrew :)

    It would be great if Tasman could come along on Sunday!

    Curious, I've never tried acorns in the fridge ... makes sense.
    Happy growing :)
     
  11. kabi

    kabi New Member

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    It's great, one day I will go there
     

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