paper bricks

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by teela, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. teela

    teela Junior Member

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    Does anyone else make paper bricks for their fire? I've been making them for years, but spend ages tearing up papers, then soak papers in old bath for a week before using the brick maker to make the bricks. I'm sick of spending all the time ripping paper out in the shed. If paper isn't shredded or ripped into small enough pieces the bricks just fall apart. There's gotta be a better way! I've googled it and seems some people soak un-ripped papers 1st for a few days then use a paint stirrer...the kind you attach to an electric drill. I can't see how this will work though. Has anyone else tried it or have any better ideas?

    Anyone that's never made paper bricks wont have any idea what I'm on about...but those of you that have will know.
     
  2. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I can't recall where I saw it - but I was reading recently that you can achieve the same effect by tightly rolling a damp newspaper and tying it to make a log. You can enhance it by soaking it in used cooking oil / grease. I haven't tried it though.
     
  3. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    You could try soaking the newspapers for a month or six months in the bath. I'm sure the paper would break down eventually (depending on your climate), especially if it was exposed to the sun. You'd have to experiment to get the optimal breaking down for bricks but not so broken down you couldn't use it, but I'm wondering if at some point you can scoop the paper out and mash it with your hands as you put it into the brick maker. You'd need to keep out leaves and other organic matter or it would get manky. That's the least energy intensive method I can think of.
     

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