Outdoor kitchen - permaculture style

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Mike_E_from_NZ, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. Mike_E_from_NZ

    Mike_E_from_NZ Junior Member

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    I want to establish a summer kitchen, out of doors. I envisage that it will be able to quickly covered as the weather gets cooler or damper. It would probably not be used for the wettest and coolest months of the year.

    Would envisage that I would cook for 10-20 people - sometimes less. Seldom more.

    I am starting the investigation stage so I am looking for ideas of what to put in the kitchen - the final designs of these items would come later.

    Since space is not a constraint, I figure I can have all sorts of specialty implements - varying distances away from the centre of the kitchen - especially if they are home made and low cost.

    So far I would have rocket stove versions of a bread oven, regular oven, cook top, water heater. A methane ring (and therefore digestor) for small quantities of heat (eg. cup of tea in the afternoon). Worm farm, solar dehydrator, pizza earth oven. And a regular bbq style grill - of course.

    In a sheltered area (so it can be shared with the indoor winter kitchen) I might have a bunch of appliances powered by humans - blender, grain mill for example. (https://www.bikeblender.com/)

    Grey water treatment is obvious.

    There is no reason to limit the kitchen to the kitchen. Just like digestion takes place in the mouth as well, a well designed garden might have some processing equipment in it. The obvious one is a tub so that the veggies can be washed in the garden before the even reach the kitchen. Soil stays where it should.

    Three tubs at the sink bench. One for the first rinse, one for the soap wash, on for the final rinse. It would be cool to be able to change the position of these full of water. That way when the first rinse water becomes too dirty, I can move the soap water to the first rinse and so on. Any ideas on how I might sensibly achieve this?

    An ammonia intermittent refrigeration cycle device might be overkill, I think. But very cool to show visitors. (Yes, I saw the pun - but only after I typed it.)

    Maybe a flowform that the drinking water goes through, so as to energise it before it hits the glass? A little glass top box, flush with the bench, that a recipe book can be placed in for easy reference.

    What about vernacular (so to speak) cooking and preparation implements? One that I came across yesterday was a boiling water grape juice extractor from Austria. Grapes in the top, boiling water in the bottom, and the grape juice miraculously appeared in a third place. More research is needed here. I believe that small electric hullers are available in Japan and Italy.

    Does anyone have any more ideas that I should research before I get too far?

    Mike
     
  2. Peter Clements

    Peter Clements Junior Member

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    Mike, I love the idea of outdoor kitchens, although Melbourne weather is not always perfect! In our new house I have designed an outdoor kitchen right outside the kitchen window, on the patio. The idea comes from Malaysia where the "wet" kitchen outside the house is used for steamy stir-fries. I have provided an external gas point for the barbie, and also a waste pipe for a sink. A second pipe with a greywater diverter can be installed to flow to the garden. It's like having a second living room looking out over the garden.
     
  3. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Mike,

    We have an outdoor kitchen, with a wood fueled cook stove and an open hearth for large groups. We fed about 25-32 people for two weeks with it, at the PDC we held here.

    Photos: https://www.aussieslivingsimply.com.au/p ... hp?album=6 on second page (first page shows some construction work).

    Hi Peter!

    C
     
  4. Peter Clements

    Peter Clements Junior Member

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    stonework

    Thanks for that link to your photos Christopher- your stonework is an inspiration, since I am about to begin paving my own patio with crazy paving, probably basalt which is abundant in Victoria. The stonework of the Maya ruins must be fascinating to discover- there's a sustainable building system for you! The stonework really links all the buildings together, and the stones have a strong human touch. The cacao roasting process also sounds very interesting- could you post a few more photos showing the various stages?
     
  5. heuristics

    heuristics Junior Member

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    kitchen

    Sorry to sound snippy, but at this point I would just like to have a half-ways decent INSIDE kitchen!


    Good on you though, my envy does me no credit
     
  6. Peter Clements

    Peter Clements Junior Member

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    self-indulgence

    I agree with you heuristics- this whole forum has become a den of aristocratic self-indulgence :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  7. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Peter,

    Um, does that make me aristicracy?

    I am paving the area between the kitchen and the house, about half way done now with more river stones... will post more photos later, when it is done.

    I like stone work.... Dawn likes carpentry. Therefore, with seperation of areas of expertise, we seldom argue...

    C
     
  8. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    HAHAHAHA HEURISTICS...


    lovely thought.......for years our inside kitchen looked like most outside kitchens and our outside kitchen was a wood fired barbecue plate that we moved all the time.

    So I do sympathise...


    Cheers
     
  9. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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  10. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Mike, how's the kitchen coming? You've got a lot of interesting plans, would like to hear what you've tried.

    I know from having an outdoor kitchen that it's the birds and the critters who make it home are always an issue. The more nooks and crannies for birds (and their poop), snakes, spiders, frogs, rats and mice, etc., to get into, the more they move in. I keep mine as spare as possible so as to make cleaning all surfaces easy, and the BBQ portable, built-in picnic tables covered with boat spar varnish.

    And I have a flagstone floor with mortar so keep the weeds at the edges. Since I'm at the coast I don't use metal surfaces or containers because of the rust. Stone, brick, cement seem to be my best friends outside :)
     
  11. Richard on Maui

    Richard on Maui Junior Member

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    Does the accumulation of leaves in the outdoor kitchen get you down? I suppose screens are good, but then they need constant cleaning too. Cripes, I have a hard enough time keeping our indoor kitchen clean. :lol:
    Seriously, I like the idea, I do. Especially if burning wood or any kind of oven is part of the program...
     
  12. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Christopher,

    I meant to say, your stonework for your patio is so very impressive! How did find all those flat stones and fit those so painstakingly? Kudos to you, that's not an easy job!! :)
     
  13. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Sweetpea,

    Than ks for the kind words!

    I got the stones from the bottom of the river we live by, spending my spare time out in the dug out canoe, usually in the hottest part of the day, as an excuse to avoid hot sweaty real work :lol: like chopping, clearing, harvesting, you know, farm work!

    I spent a month or so placeing the stones, with sand and gravel under neath them.

    C
     
  14. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    And here are yet some more photos of the out door kitchen (to bore you all further!). Dawn has been building a wooden verandah with a big space for food proccesing and storage around the existing stone part of the kitchen, (which is not complete), and this is where she was today when she finished working on it:

    https://www.aussieslivingsimply.com.au/photogallery.php?album=6&rowstart=48

    The last four photos are the ones of the wooden floor and counter she is working on.
     
  15. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    tezza, mate, no worries. been dealt with. done. whatever.
     

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