Our little Chook shed

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by Three Happy Aussies, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. Three Happy Aussies

    Three Happy Aussies Junior Member

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    Good afternoon all,

    Taking a well earned tea break at work and had a lightbulb moment that it may be helpful to put up a link which shows the building of our little Chook Shed (thanks Weebly for your wonderful free resources). As is always the case with us what was initially going to be a simple and functional design ended up turning into a term we've seen in other threads in this section i.e. the Chook Mahal...lol. This is what happens when hubby builds everything to withstand the end of days...hahaha.

    Anyway here is a link that shows everything from go to wow. https://dragonfly-farm.weebly.com/the-chicken-coop-project.html

    In terms of technical details here is breakdown of what we actually paid for and what we go for freeeee... As you may know from reading our thread on the Newbies page we are very anti big Corporate and Governement but we have to say that without the kindness of our new friend "Gordo" from our local Bunnings this whole thing may have been a little harder to pull together. We always had the idea of building the shed from old pallets and had the feeling that finding the volume we would need would be a pit of a pain in the butt... But we were pleasantly surprised when we went in for some other materials and posed the question to Gordo at the trade desk "Do you have any old pallets we could have"?

    Well the answer was a resounding yes take all you can carry... It appears that pretty much all Bunnings stores get huge deliveries every day and they all come in on pristine pallets of all shapes and sizes, not to mention other useful things such as compressed cardboard sheeting (great for insulation of the shed). Luckily we have quite a big 4X4 so three loads later we had all we needed of all materials.

    All we really paid for throughout the whole project was some wood screws of varying lenths (mostly 60mm by 5mm thick) and some non structural pine 3 by 2 inches by 2.4m long each for the bargain price of $3.50 per length. So all in all we whole heartedly recommend using the free resources that are available to us... Oh and on a side note they also throw away huge quantities of cardboard of all types which makes for great footpath coverings etc when setting up the Permi garden (thanks Mr Lawton for that suggestion).

    The roof on the coop for anyone who is interested was donated (thanks uncle Brad and Aunty Nic) and is made of old fibreglass and polycarb corrugated sheets. If you do have to buy them new though they are a lot cheaper than the full galvanised stuff at around $35 per lenght (approx 4 linear metres). The most expensive part of the whole shed were the roofing screws which are a must unless you want your roof to leak or spend time with a silicon gun. They are around $15 for a pack of 50.

    Hope this has been helpful info. We love talking to other permies so feel free to say hi or leave a comment (good or bad we don't mind).

    Lots a love,

    Three Happy Aussies
     
  2. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Lovely story. Plumbers crack and all!
     
  3. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    I averted my eyes.

    Nice picture story. I also have been using cardboard and was surprised when Mr. Lawton talked about how the cardboard becomes food for the fungi. I have been on a mission to carboard and woodchip up all my trees!

    Against the law to have chooks here in this town, but I have been known to break some of these silly rules from time to time, and I might make use of some of these ideas...
     
  4. Three Happy Aussies

    Three Happy Aussies Junior Member

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    LOL... just be thankful it's not summer yet....plumbers crack is the least you would have to avert your eyes from then... ;) being that we are all nudie rudies...hahaha.

    We are actually going to do picture stories on the site for each and every project we accomplish as we go with the idea that the information good or bad may help someone else and stop them from making the same mistakes we do at the time. Were big fans of helping the greater good...=).

    We are definitely looking forward to taking heaps of Cardboard of Bunnings Hardwares hands once we have scrapped together the money for the backhoe to come in and remove a couple of old tree stumps that are getting in the way of our soon to be installed beds/swales... Will keep you posted on that one but Fungi is definitely our friend =).

    Our opininon on Gov't is not a good one at all (right up there with people that buy a house next to an airport and then complain about the noise...lol). Our feelings on keeping chooks are it's your land you paid for it so within reason do whatever you please and don't tell them anything. Our chooks make so little noise half the time that we have to check and make sure they are still there...lol.
     
  5. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Looks great!!! rude cracks an all!!!
    Whats next?
     
  6. Three Happy Aussies

    Three Happy Aussies Junior Member

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    Were not sure where to start next actually..... It's a toss up between the Rocket Mass Heater/Stove Project, The Fence Project or The Grey Water Treatment System Project. It all depends on the kindness of strangers at this point as we are currently saving to afford the petrol for our 4x4 to go and pick up some more free bathtubs which will enable us to do the Greywater Project.... We also need to get our hands on a welder to do the RMH project as we are kinda sorta going to overengineer the heck out of the thing so it is pretty much bulletproof for years and years to come. The fence project which will enable us to let our girls freerange without having to worry about hungry foxes etc as well as enabling us to start planting our garden is currently waiting for our friendly saw mill operator up the road to find a nice log of Brush Box (we are in a highly termite prone area).... Don't worry though as we said we will continue to put up heaps of pix on our website and link them to here for feedback.
     
  7. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Hello THA,
    The greywater project will provide substantial returns on your efforts! Ours has provided a growing "lush" area and the resultant soil-critter activity that's difficult to achieve in a hot, semi-arid climate. Good luck on the bathtubs!
     
  8. Three Happy Aussies

    Three Happy Aussies Junior Member

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    Hi 9anda1f,

    After having to shell out $150 for a water delivery late last week (we only have one bit of roof to capture rainwater as the rest has rusted fall down guttering) we are desperately keen to get the Greywater Project up and running. Wifey part of the three of us had a great idea actually whereby the Greywater performed a dual function whereby it could be diverted to the toilet cystern as well as going onto the garden. We would very much like to see what your design is like as we've tossed out quite a few idea's to each other but haven't settled on anything as yet. Part of us was thinking bathtubes placed end to end (probably x 4) with pipes in between to allow the water to flow from tub to tub but after reading some stuff online it seems that depth of the treatment trench is a very important factor. Soooooo if you have any info, plans or pictures that you could supply us with we would be very very greatful :D
     

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