old batteries

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by hedwig, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    I know, we should'nt use any batteries at all, but I've got some old batteries and I don't know were to put them., in Brisbane.
    Is there a possibility in the supermarkets??
     
  2. Penny

    Penny Junior Member

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    Most battery suppliers take old batteries when you get a new one. I've found they will usually take them as the lead is recycled. I have made the assumption that you are reffering to vehicle batteries
     
  3. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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    Take them to the tip, they should have an area where they deal with them.
     
  4. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    thanks, normal batteries - it's a bit elaborate going to the tip only for three old batteries. If I can bring them were thea are sold I could bring them in every supermarket -right?
     
  5. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    I just let them collect in a box until I'm going to the dump (tip) anyway.

    Sue
     
  6. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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    I thought you were talking about car batteries, I don't think small batteries are recyclable, if you take them back to the supermarket, they will just throw them out.

    Look up the battery makers website and e-mail them the question.
     
  7. cecilia

    cecilia Junior Member

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    old batteries

    In Japan everyone brings batteries back to any shop that sells batteries, so after coming back to Australia I was incredulous that they weren't recycled here. I did all the phonecalls - local government, electronic companies, Visy, and heard that our population is too small to bother recycling them.

    The best thing to do is write to your local member of parliament (which I didn't get around to doing, come to think of it) .
    I did buy a solar-powered battery recharger, and rechargable batteries, so my camera flash is from sunshine of weeks ago - so poetic!

    While you are writng to the politicians, please mention that a take-back-to the shop scheme for other things we don't want in landfill such as used turpentine would be good. Oh, and an 'orphanage' for unwanted housepaint, where people wanting only small amounts could come and get it for free.
     
  8. LittleFish

    LittleFish Junior Member

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    Hi Hedwig

    I used to work in a photo lab and we had a lot of people coming in asking us to recycle their old camera batteries.
    Eventually the owner of the store put a big jar on the counter with a label saying "battery recycling". Everyone would place their old batteries in the jar and leave feeling happy. At the end of the week the owner would empty the jar into the rubbish bin.
    It used to be possible to recycle batteries when they contained mercury but no facilities currently exist in Australia to recycle domestic batteries.

    That being said you can recharge your standard alkaline household batteries using a charger similar to a standard NiCad battery recharger.
    The chargers are more difficult to come by and the process is less efficient than with NiCad batteries but it may be another option.
    DONT try to recharge standard alkaline batteries in a NiCad battery charger as they may expolde.

    a google search revealed this:
    Sydney, 12 August 2005 - Representatives from Planet Ark, CSIRO and prominent technology and consumer product organisations will meet next week to discuss if and how Australia can establish its first on-shore facility for recycling consumer product batteries, Canon Australia announced today.

    High-temperature metallurgical processing (pyrometallurgy) is increasingly being used to treat industrial waste, such as used batteries. This prompted Canon Australia to approach CSIRO Minerals, a world leader in pyrometallurgy with experience in waste treatment.

    "CSIRO brings a deep knowledge of pyrometallurgy to the industry workshop," said Mr Shuichi Tsukahara, Managing Director, Canon Australia. "We are also thrilled at the prospect of working with Planet Ark on another mass collection scheme. This discussion would not be possible without the support of the technology and consumer product industries and we're delighted that so many influential companies are sending representatives to participate."

    Battery recycling facilities already exist in Europe, America, Japan and Korea, which treat the waste to recover valuable components. On 18 July 2005 Senator Ian Campbell announced that dealers and exporters of used electronic equipment in Australia will have to comply with tough new criteria to prevent the unauthorised export of hazardous electronic waste ("e-waste").

    Each year Australians discard about 8,000 tonnes of used batteries - an important component of e-waste. Canon Australia believes that a domestic battery recycling facility can help Australia reduce or eliminate its export of used batteries.

    According to CSIRO High Temperature Processing Manager Dr Sharif Jahanshahi, recycling batteries will deliver both environmental and economic benefits: "CSIRO has a strong focus on waste treatment and recycling R&D. By harnessing our research skills and partnering with industry and environmental groups, CSIRO can help develop a potential new industry for Australia and reduce landfill."

    The workshop will be held at CSIRO Minerals in Clayton, Victoria, on 15 August 2005.

    Attending the workshop will be:

    Dr Sharif Jahanshahi, CSIRO Minerals
    Kumar Mahadevan, Canon Australia
    Paul Klymenko, Planet Ark
    plus representatives from a wide range of companies in the technology and consumer industries.

    https://www.canon.com.au/about/press_roo ... _1352.html

    cheers
    Stephen
     
  9. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    thanks for the answers! Most of the batteries I use are rechargable, it only some. If you pop it in the rubbish bin, the chemicals will leach out and coming sooner or later in the water tables. Or if the rubbish is burned and you do not have a top standard filter system it'll get in the air.
    I'm a bit shocked, in Germany it is forbidden throwing them into the rubbish bin- as far as I know -, well it's not controlled.
    recycling or not, it should at lest be separated and stored differently than old nappys.
    Rechargable batteries are much more dangerous at least the ni-ca type after they cannot be recharged any more- though a separate collection is important in any case.
     

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