No seed set on Broad beans??

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by funkyfungus, May 9, 2005.

  1. funkyfungus

    funkyfungus Junior Member

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    A query

    ive looked around with google and cant find a cause for this

    Im growing a variety of Broad bean (vicia faba) called Peruvian emerald

    its flowering but im not getting any bean set
    days are warm in the mid 20's but the nights go down to about 7c +/- and falling

    can anyone suggest a cause and or remedy?

    Interestingly i also had problems with a gramma ( c moschata) var 'sunset' not stting fruit until the last week or so
    heaps of lowers but even hand pollination was zero
    but now with cooler temperatures (chilly actually) im getting lots of sets
    (i hope they are fast as we have only 3 weeks before i expect first frost)

    there was acomplicating issue with 2 large wasp nests i could not get rid of until the wasps left voluntarily a week ago. theire presence had kept both egrubs and bees out of the vegie patch all summer

    but anyway that has nothing to do with the beans...
     
  2. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    I don't know if this would have anything to do with your problem, but I found it interesting:

    https://gears.tucson.ars.ag.gov/book/chap4/broad.html

    “Probably the most important observation concerning the pollination of field bean was that by Drayner (1956,1959) and confirmed in more elaborate detail by Bond and Fyfe (1962) who showed that continued inbreeding causes a progressive loss in the ability of the plant to set selfed seed, but upon hybridization (cross-pollination) this ability is restored. This means that the plant can survive several generations (not indefinitely) without cross-pollination although production continually decreases. A similar situation apparently exists in many other so-called self-pollinated crops; continued inbreeding leads inevitably to elimination of the strain.”

    Sue
     
  3. funkyfungus

    funkyfungus Junior Member

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    Thanks sue

    i planted about a dozen or more plants but all from the same stock. the seed colours were varaibale bwteen brown and light green. i wa sthinking this demonstrated some variability
    oh well if the so plant the remainder alongside another type to hybridise and then grow it back out through the F series till i have a good strain again
     

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