Newcomer from San Diego

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself Here' started by Roedeer, Nov 16, 2016.

  1. Roedeer

    Roedeer New Member

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    Hello! I am a highschool student in San Diego. I joined because my friends are interested in making a forest. We want to make a fruit bearing forest that will eventually be self-sustaining. We went to our principal and got his stamp of approval, and is interested in helping us make this happen. Unfortunately, we have no idea how it is going to happen. Which is why I joined this group. The first thing we have to do is get the land needed. That is probably one of the hardest parts. While we are doing that, we need to find trees that are suited to our environment. After we get the land we will have to do the back-breaking (hopefully not literally) work of digging the land we need. And making the dirt and planting the trees. But we don't know how to do that. And that's why I joined! Thank you for reading this and please give any hints and links to threads that are helpful!
     
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  2. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Hi Roedeer,
    Wow! You guys want to grow a forest. That is a tall order.

    I see you have logged your climate as coastal desert, I'm not sure what that means or where it is, but one of the first steps would probably be to look at what is already growing in your area and doing well and finding out what in locally native to your area.
    That might give you an idea of what fruit/nut trees would do well for you.

    If you expanded this to what would provide food for native wildlife including native and introduced bees, you should have a more stable forest, as opposed to just growing fruit trees that people like to eat.

    If you have a nature reserve in your area, it might be a good idea to get a school trip organised to study this.
    The first principle in permaculture is Observe.

    Here is a link to David Holgren's food forest.
    https://www.foodforest.com.au/

    I am in New Zealand which doesnt have desert conditions. You might find Australian conditions and solutions to be of more use.

    Without knowing how many of you are interested in getting involved in this, you could get something impressive going just by getting your parents to let you grow these trees in their yards, as well as getting your local schools to allow you to do the same in the areas they have set aside for gardens. That way, you are not having to buy land specifically for this.
    It might not seem like a forest, but you never know what you might start here. If enough of you get on board, you could wind up living in a food forest.

    Once, there was a man in France, who decided to replant an Oak forest. He did this by planting one tree every day.

    I am looking forward to seeing what you guys come up with and absolutely thrilled at the idea of it.
    I wish you all the best.
     
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  3. Roedeer

    Roedeer New Member

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    Thank you! We currently have 7 members (Not including adults) that want to do this and we think a lot more will be willing to help out. Yeah, we have a lot of good trees in our area. Some of the native trees are oak trees, acacia, cedar, western redbud, crape myrtle, lemon bottlebrush and a lot more! We already have a few trees that we definitely want to add like most of the ones above, but we also want to add royal purple smoke trees, peach trees, nectarines, pomegranates, avocados, pluots, figs, and some non-native threes but are suited to our environment like loquats, lychees, macadamia nut trees, and even walnuts! Of course, we won't be able to get most of these, but we can hope. Unfortunately, we don't have much room in our backyards and our parents aren't exactly willing to grow a forest in our backyard even if it is a fruit and nut bearing forest. And if we do everything correctly, the forest will be self-sustaining in 3-4 years. This is all a little far-fetched, but we will be able to do at least a little of what I said above. The adults are working to find a place to grow the forest, and we are working on fundraising so we can pay for the tools, water, trees, and dirt, mulch, etc. . .
     
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  4. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Hi Roedeer and welcome,
    I think you and your group have come up with an excellent idea, and you're going to learn some very interesting (and critical to the human species) information about how the natural world works. Agro-forestry (food forests by another name) is a study of the inter-relationships between a variety of plant systems (not just trees by any means) that have been described as layers. The relationships between plants in these layers and the soil is what makes it self-sustaining.
    [​IMG]
    https://permaculturenews.org/2011/10/21/why-food-forests/

    Your climate is classified as semi-arid with between 9" - 13" of annual precipitation, mainly falling during the winter, so keeping what water does fall in the soil is very important to establishing your forest while the plantings are young. This is often done by mulching, windbreaks, and planting support species to provide shade, shed leaves (natural mulch), and fix nitrogen in the soil. https://permaculturenews.org/2015/0...or-a-dryland-food-forest-a-practical-example/

    Anyhow, just a couple of things to ponder. Looking forward to working with you and your group on this project!
     
  5. allyann

    allyann Member

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    Welcome Roedeer,

    Best of luck. I will enjoy following you and your fellow members journey in creating a forest :)

    ~allyann
     

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