new zealand spinach

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by hedwig, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    I yet tried to sow new zealand spinach directly in summer, without results. Can I sow it now (Brisbane) and it is better to preplant it in pots?
    Does it grow in the normal Brisbane soil (because it is native) or does it need compost/ a raised bed? And: does someone know a good companion plant?
     
  2. derekh

    derekh Junior Member

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    I grew mine in seed raising trays and then into pots for a few weeks before transplanting. I have a slightly raised planting bed with compost mixed in and it has grown well. I haven't tried eating them yet so I cannot comment on taste.

    Try Google for more information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_spinach

    cheers
    derek
    (Narangba)
     
  3. Richard on Maui

    Richard on Maui Junior Member

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    It is a pretty tough plant. Grows at the beach so it can take sandy, salty soils... At the beach it usually tastes kinda salty. From a garden with nice soil and fresh water it is nicer to eat I reckon. It grows pretty easily from cuttings in my experience. I would think any time of year should be alright for seed, although I haven't propagated much of it that way. Good ground cover once established. It will perrenialise... What is again, Tetragonia tetragonoides???
     
  4. barely run

    barely run Junior Member

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    It is called warrigal green as well as NZ Spinach...good source of increased omega3 in eggs when fed to chooks. Needs light steaming for humans as it is high in ??oxalic?? which is very bitter if not cooked.
    Find it now in trendy Sydney restaurants...often at farmers markets. Grows well from cuttings or root offsets....lost mine in the drought last year :cry: but will try again.
    Cathy
     
  5. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day hedwig,

    yeh i found raising from seeds difficult as well then i'm no green thumb at germination hey :wink: if they get full sun in summer they need lots of water and they don't like the frost. will grow in a very wide variety of soils.

    i get best results from cuttings or getting young plants i have a couple in pots if you want them they have it growing down on the water front near me so i reckon a cutting that accidently falls of the plant won't be missed hey. i also have some italian spinach grows much the same but with a glossy leaf could give you a cutting of that i've already promised derek some. haven't got a lot of that until we move into our own home and i can get it growing properly

    len :D 8)
     
  6. billybuttongirl

    billybuttongirl Junior Member

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    I've got heaps of the stuff if anyone wants seeds... it would be another few months until the fruit germinates. they tend to self seed themselves everywhere in my garden (i know not QLD...). It seems to die down at my place in winter due to cold and takes a bit of time to get going in spring, but spreads like mad once going. i have one near some mint, one near some chervil and one near my raspberry canes. all going great, so not sure if there is a good companion plant.

    Yep, it is Tetragonia tetragoides and yes, you do need to blanch them for a few secs in boiling water or stem them to get rid of some of the oxalic acid. i personally think its an awesome replacement for European spinach, last weekend i made a greek spinach pie (spanakopita) use 100% native spinace. tasted great. the young tips you can add fresh to a salad.

    cheers,
    Billybuttongirl
     
  7. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day bbg,

    great stuff aint it hey?

    yeh i find i only generally use the youngest 2 or 4 leaves not so much oxalic then (bitter taste) also i never pick it when it is coming into flower for the same reason, i like it when it has that new flush of tender growth.

    len
     
  8. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    thanks a lot! Sounds a really interesting vegetable. (One of the greens we can east as "weed-pizza". Normally I have no problems growing by seed, but I thought It is a though plant ans threw the seeds directly into the soil in summer heat... Perhaps it is quicker with cuttings - but by post I don't know if it will survive??
     

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