Native plant mandalas!

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by inahd, May 28, 2008.

  1. inahd

    inahd Junior Member

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    looking around my local native plant nurseries i find dozens of plants that have edible, medicinal, and practical uses. Not being an expert in permaculture i will not provide a mandala for New England. i think it would be really cool if people designed native plant mandalas or keyhole beds for their areas and posted them here! Here are some of the plants i picked up and saw for sale:

    oak (acorns)
    walnut
    pecan
    hickory

    black cherry
    chokecherry
    crabapple
    papaw/paw paw (not papaya)
    persimmon
    mulberry
    sumac
    hazelnut

    blueberries
    serviceberry
    chokeberry
    elderberry
    cranberry bush
    spice bush
    bayberry


    broomcorn
    mullien
    corn
    squash
    camas (edible root)
    sweetgrass
     
  2. barely run

    barely run Junior Member

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    Re: Native plant mandalas!

    Where was the native nursery Inahd....i am in the New England region.
    Cathy
     
  3. inahd

    inahd Junior Member

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    Re: Native plant mandalas!

    there are a few near me here in PA (east). just go to the website of your state native plant society for links to nurseries near you.
     
  4. cate

    cate New Member

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    Re: Mulberry Trees

    Firstly, I'm sorry for using your post to post my question from - I don't know how to start a fresh one yet.
    I am writing for my mother, who was recently given a rather new variety of Mulberry tree that is a type of Dwarf Black and all the leaves are going rusty colour. I suspect that she has over fed it as she does with the cat, her grandchildren and me.
    It was bought from a nursery in South East Queensland and cost about $30. It's about 2meters tall and looks rather woody at this stage. Mum blames her soil, which is probably why she's overfed it. But I know that she's planted it on a spot that used to house guinea pigs (I don't know if their droppings would effect the soil).
    Would anyone kindly know why her leaves are turing rusty?
    Thank you. :kermit:
     
  5. Comfrey

    Comfrey Junior Member

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    Re: Native plant mandalas!

    Cate

    I don't know the variety your mother has, but I shouldn't think a mulberry would require much in the way of food or water, as they grow a lot where I live which is generally hot and dry, clay lime soil.
    The leaves used to be used to feed silk worm caterpillars in the cottage silk industry (just in case you're interested!!!).
    Presuming it was planted properly, I'd just talk to it nicely and wait and see what happens after winter...
    If the tree really has rust (powdery orange spots on the back of the leaves) I don't think there is a lot you can do apart from removing the affected leaves and putting fresh mulch under the tree. Although this would suggest to me that it was unhappy in some other way.
    Is she feeding it anything in particular?

    In relation to the previous post, I believe mulberries are planted as a barrier between walnuts and other fruit trees, I'm going to try this. I agree with you - it would be great to read more about natural plant communities and guilds.
     
  6. Raymondo

    Raymondo Junior Member

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    Re: Native plant mandalas!

    cate, mulberries are deciduous in certain climates. It may be just cooler weather causing the change. As far as feeding goes, there's little point in feeding as we head into the cooler part of the year. Suggest to her that she let the tree rest now.

    Judging by the plants listed, inahd is from the US, yes? A native mandala in the New England region here in Australia is a very different kettle of fish to one in the New England region of the US, particularly if you were sticking to local species. I can think of only a few offhand - lomandra, microseris, bulbine, dichopogon.
    For native nurseries, I don't know of one in Glen Innes but there's one near Tenterfield (Mole Station) and one in Armidale (Armidale Tree Group). I work at the latter and we buy from the former.
     

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