Nardoo -Marsilea

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Michaelangelica, Jan 30, 2010.

  1. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Messages:
    4,771
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well just scored two beautiful nardoo plants from my favourite hardware store. I "saved" $20!! by buying them, I think?
    Marsilea drummondii and M.angutofolia.
    Both to go in my new little pond.
    Why?
    Years ago a journalsit friend was in the far outback (He used to write for "Walkabout" what ever happened t that mag?)and coped a bad dose of the crippling arthritis he often suffered from.
    Usually this would debilitate him for weeks. The aborigines he was interviewing gave him Nardoo root to chew. he said the next thing he remembers is being in Brisbane Hospital (about 3 days later). He said the Nardoo is a pain killer. (Those of you who know me will know this is a big interest of mine). My friend said that Aborigines when they discovered an empty water hole an three days to the next one would chew nardoo root to stop thirst and put them in a trance like state until they arrived at the next water source.
    The question (s)
    1. Nardoo is supposed not to set seed . So what is this on my new plant? (see my photo album shortly)
    2. Does anyone know more about the narcotic/pain killing properties of this plant?
     
  2. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nardoo is a fern , so has no seed in the strict sense, but spore cases.
    these are the parts that where used as food years ago.
    Apparently they had to be ground wet, not dry or else severe heath problems would result as
    the antinutritive compounds were rendered inactive from wet grinding.
    Thats how Bourke and Wills perished....
    they didn't have the important bit of food processing info.

    much like when maize was taken to Africa and Europe the info about adding an alkali substance
    during cooking ( known for centuries by Mesoamericans) wasn't taken with it and millions of people suffer Niacin defficiency and get Pellagra.
     
  3. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Messages:
    4,771
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks speedy.
    The little spore pouches at the base of the plant certainly look like seed pods- such a lot of spore for so little a plant! I guess if you had an acre of it growing you would get a fair bit of food.
    Any clues on propaging it from spore?
    Have you come accross the possible narcotic/pain killing attrributes of the roots?
    There may be a specific variety that has this property(?).

    The other facinating thing about maize--recently discoverd--is that when grown as Indigenous Americans did--as Thee sisters-- it gave ALL the amino acids necessary for survival.
    SEE
    https://forums.permaculture.org.au/...rn-squash-The-Three-Sisters&highlight=sisters
     
  4. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I dont know anything about Marsilea spore propagation.
    it's easy from divisions of rhizome.

    I dont know anything about pharmacological properties either.


    Pulse and grain combination for a more complete amino acid profile
    It seems to be a common theme repeated in different cultures.

    India-rice and dahl, rice and chickpea, naan and dahl
    Nth Africa-bread , cracked wheat or rice and faba bean or lentil
    Africa- millet or sorghum and beans
    Americas- maize and beans
    China, Korea, japan- rice or wheat and soy (usually fermented in various ways)
    Indonesia- rice and tempe or oncom (peanut ferment)

    Yeah, three sisters.
    I have Black turtle beans growing up the 'Manning White' maize with chiles, green beans and Squash around the edges.
    Tomatillos self sown everywhere.

    Interspersed with that I have Cleome and Cosmos , also trad. partners in this system.

    Tortillas, frijoles negros de olla , salsa verde ...yum!

    I've had trouble finding Maize varieties.
    nowhere near as many on offer as there where 20 yrs ago.

    I'm after Hickory king, and any others for that matter.
     
  5. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Messages:
    4,771
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  6. Aaronj

    Aaronj Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2010
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    .
     
  7. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Messages:
    4,771
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Marsilea minuta
    [​IMG]
    Uses: Culinary/Medicinal Duration: Perennial (hardy in zones 8-11+)
    (Waterclover; Fern Clover; Sak) Brain food! Gotu kola, bacopa, and sushni make a trinity of top South Asian herbs used to enhance brain function. In Bangladesh and West Bengal sushni is commonly sold in vegetable markets as a medicinal leafy green, mainly to help overcome insomnia. It is cheaper and more readily available than prescription drugs. The fresh leaves are ground into a paste and eaten as chutney, or the whole leaves are eaten in salads or cooked like spinach. The plant contains marsiline, a substance with sedative and anticonvulsant properties. In clinical trials sushni was shown to reduce the incidence of epileptic seizures and increased the duration of sleep, with no withdrawal symptoms. Sushni has a powerful anti-cholesterol effect also: in one study it reduced blood cholesterol by 31% and liver cholesterol by 71% when fed to animals. The plant looks like clover, and forms beautiful mats like clover, but is actually a type of miniature fern. Like mimosa the leaves fold up at night. Prefers full sun. https://www.richters.com/Web_store/web_store.cgi?product=X5430&cart_id=111.100

    Marsilea drummondii
    https://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?
    page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Marsilea~drummondii

    https://anpsa.org.au/APOL5/mar97-2.htmlThe unusual aquatic fern, nardoo (Marsilea drummondii), produces edible sporocarps. Almost every Australian knows that Burke and Wills "starved to death" on nardoo, but only recently have we learned exactly why. Both nardoo and mussels, the freshwater staples of the inland, contain an enzyme that destroys vitamin B1. By rejecting the Aboriginal methods of roasting the shellfish and wet grinding and then baking the nardoo, which neutralises the toxic enzyme, the explorers eventually died of beriberi. Evidence of the preparation of nardoo is widespread round Padygole (Gracemere), where many grindstones remain in situ on the Archer property.
     

Share This Page

-->