My lands

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by Rick Larson, Oct 11, 2013.

  1. helenlee

    helenlee Junior Member

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    Fantastic effort Rick :)
    Great video :)
     
  2. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    Right. I changed the word best to most. Thanks. That is an interesting squash story, diversifying the spot paid off!
     
  3. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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  4. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    Also grew Roy Calias, but it is harder to grind, and also a shoepeg corn, which we ate in the milk stage. Then there was this 12 foot high corn that was suppose to be 4 foot high Hookers Indian sweet. I haven't done anything with that stuff yet. Next year I have to do popcorn again, and might try some of that paint corn. We'll see what happens, i don't like making plans cast in concrete. :)

    These muffins have a moist dense feel and the taste is mildly sweet with a smooth corn aftertaste. Very, very filling! You are welcome.
     
  5. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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  6. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    The solar link has been changed to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eq-mKuTDGP0

    Here is the script I typed in:

    Published on Jan 28, 2014
    Did you know there is a natural gas shortage too? Can't get it in the pipelines fast enough, its been so cold.

    I used to sell solar and would tell people that natural gas was subsidized by the government and investors, that is why the price is low, that is why the return is low too.

    Investors encouraged by the criminals on Wall Street, they gambled big money on fracking, sinking billions into the process. This investor money has had the same effect on the price of natural gas as government tax credits and subsidies have had - the price of natural gas sinking faster than a 100 pound asteroid entering the atmosphere at 100,000 miles an hour.

    So what did everybody, their brother, and their uncle do? They converted everything possible over to using natural gas! So its no big surprise there is a shortage, and all I have left to type is what do you think is going to happen once the investor market is tapped out, and/or the government is so broke it can't subsidize the process any longer? It just won't be higher prices, it will be shortages! (monotone voice) Like we have right now.

    And the morons and goons in charge at the monopoly utilities and thier fuel suppliers are going to be laughing all the way to the bank. All with the blessings of our government. So don't let the bastard politicians off the hook, They are just as guilty.

    Anyway, that is why I have solar on my house. I know whats coming. (monotone)Hope you enjoy the video.
     
  7. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    how do you keep winter kitchen scraps?
     
  8. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    You could have linked it up yourself! Anyway, since green material is hard to find early spring, I am saving up for an April Berkely-styled pile. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyWgXTPECx8

    I did the same thing the last few years, but until I took the PDC, and learned the difference between aerobic and anaerobic, it took 6 months before I could use it. Then it wasn't as good either. Here is the one from last spring: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JaEsq6rXGg
     
  9. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    Occupation:
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    -15C-35C, 10cm rain/mo, clay, full sun, K-G Dfa=x=Dfb
    no, i could not link it up myself, ;) that is why i asked in words for a description, videos do me little good here, pictures often take quite some time to get through too. if you are not willing to write descriptions then ignore my questions as that is fine with me.
     
  10. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    Me no ignore you songbird, me needs to learn what your questions mean. So,if you were instead typing, "I saw another link about how you keep kitchen scraps but can't play the video. Can you please give me a description"? I would reply, "Why certianly! All winter long I have been dumping kitchen scraps into an empty barrell located outside in freezing temperatures on the shade side of my shed (so it doesn't unthaw in the sun). Then put a cover over it to keep the critters out. Come spring, when green material is in short supply, I will use the kitchen scraps in place of (green material) for the first of the year aerobic Berkely-styled compost heap, as taught in the online PDC I took starring Geoff Lawton (name drop)".

    And the music they played in the intros was hardly anything to notice, certianly not Beny Hill like (reference kimbo), but of what little there was, it was more like Star Wars, and we were being inititiated into the rebel force.

    There got two birds with one stone with this post.:)
     
  11. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    me says thank you! :)

    it may be easy to put stuff in a barrel to freeze it, but it sounds like work later when you gotta deal with that barrel. dice it up and dry it, simple and stores as is with no further bother, when it is dry, the worms will love it when they have it fed to them and it gets rehydrated, keeping a bucket or two of worms inside gives you dirt and worms to play with all winter. :) it's more fun than watching tv. even Benny Hill.

    i'm beginning to think that composting is overrated...
     
  12. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    Yeah, there might be better ways, depends on circumstances I guess. But the way Geoff taught it I don't have to dry or even chop it up. The bacteria will do all that work for me. Matter-of-fact, I have already tested this and it works to perfection. I even put whole green stinging nettles and goldenrod stems, leaves roots and all, in without chopping. Sure the first turn was a hassle, but after that the bacteria either had softened the stems sufficiently, or had already digested them.

    Now. What I was most surprised about is how the bacteria growing in this method of composting even ate bloody meat and bones. That would not have happened in the old way I used to make compost...

    Oh, I think composting is underrated, there are so many options to learn, so there!:)
     
  13. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    :) hahaha. cheers,
     
  14. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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  15. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Did you see the Sepp Holzer style log on permies?

    Wouldn't a greater wall width provide greater insulation for your bees there? For our native bees, the general rule of thumb is 25mm of wall width but since our 42 degree days (108F), a lot of hives were lost in certain positions. Different design from the standard box may have helped but it's been generally recommended to increase wall width to 40mm minimum.
     
  16. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    The wall depth or more insulation isn't helpful as there is documentation the air outside the cluster, but inside the hive, is the same temperature as outside (I typed this explanation out on the link). So no help there. The issue of condensation inside the hive is important, so shutting out the outside air is also a hazard to the bees. If the bees want more or less air, let them regulate it with propolis in or out of the cracks that separate the boxes.

    Yeah, I saw Holzer's hive. It is too small and is a swarm waiting to happen, but I suppose I will hurt his poor deelings with that idea!. Neat looking though.
     
  17. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Really? Native bee keepers have recorded temperatures being at least 10 degrees above the ambient temperature (I don't know about Apis), and above 50 degrees C, they die.
     
  18. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    You didn't read my story. I'm dealing with cold. If it was that hot, I would really open it up, put them in the shade, mist 'em, and use one of the earthworks/planting designs in Mollison's manual that would cool off the general area. You have read the manual, right?
     
  19. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    So, the living animals with the heat of thousands little electrically-charged bodies don't raise the temperature at all, nor do they want to be insulated, like an igloo, from the outside conditions?

    Really? Your serious? An igloo. A society that has survived in the coldest of conditions for hundreds of years. Insulation isn't a good thing?
     
  20. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    No. The insulation causes condensation. Condensation causes mold. Mold is an unhealthy environment forcing the bees to clean, instead of stay warm. Then if you raise the temperature too high, the bees break cluster, then will feed heavily. Since there is no nectar in winter, you will be forced to feed them. My experiments will go on regardless of your opinions. Have you read Permaculture A Designers' Manual? And have you kept bees S.O.P.?
     

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