Mulberries??

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by mischief, Mar 9, 2010.

  1. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    I have never seen a Mulberry tree and really feel like I am missing out on something here.
    After an unsuccessful search on the subject I am appealing to all those that have this wonderous gift to please tell me how/ where they are growing their specimen.
    Would I be able to fit it in the garden....I have heard that it can be quite a large tree.
     
  2. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

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    I have three different types a white a black and a shathoot (long extra sweet white berry) the black is the only one that has been in the ground for long and it it going great it is the most successful tree I've planted ,might have something to do with my sons placenta we planted it on top of.It is in the centre of my property.
     
  3. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    They can get quite large, but you can prune them to keep them to manageable size. It will fit a suburban garden easily. If you get the red variety they are best tucked in a corner somewhere as the mushy fallen fruit will stain your shoes and clothes as you walk by. And your tongue when you eat it. I have many fond memories of standing with bare purple feet, purple hands and purple lips and tongue gorging myself on mulberries in my parents backyard as a kid....
     
  4. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Yum mulberry

    Mulberry s can be invasive in a backyard situation - invading old clay sewer lines and adjacent garden beds too. It is mostly manageable though and many are the rewards. The stain is easy to remove, by the way, with a as yet ripe (green) mulberry. Grown in a chook run will allow for fallen fruit to be eagerly consumed and cut your chook food bill down in the process. I share Eco's memory of mulberries as a kid.
     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I think it could almost be called child neglect if you don't give your kids a mulberry experience during their childhood! Didn't know the green mulberry cure. That's handy.
     
  6. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Thanks guys.
    I will keep an eye out for these.
    The red one sounds good.
     
  7. bilnrobn

    bilnrobn Junior Member

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    We have a weeping mulberry which is now about 12 years old. It is the centrepiece in a 150 square metre veggie patch. We trim it to a round shape each year and it is around 2m diameter and 3 high, and has been for most of its life. The fruit is quite small but very sweet and heavily cropped. We need to net it when in fruit as the silver eyes love it. Well worth considering if you have limited space. (In season we have a plateful smothered in Yoghurt every evening to finish off our evening meal... delicious!) Here's a picture taken today...

    [​IMG]
     
  8. pumpkin

    pumpkin Junior Member

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    The white mulberries can get really big and you need a big backyard. Makes the mulberries at the top hard to reach before the birds get them unless you keep the tree a manageable size and net it. We have a dwarf black mulberry which is suitable for a backyard situation.
     
  9. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Nice garden bilnrobin! I love your permanent garden companion...
     
  10. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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    I love mulberries, I have 4, two mature, and two young whites, they grow easly from cutting and should be in all permie gardens if you can grow them, I get 30kg+ a year of fruit from two black fruit trees, love them and I can't get enough, just make sure you have the time each day for the 3-4 weeks of picking fruit each day as the fruit will drop pretty quickly, picking black fruit at night don't work, trust me I have tried. 15min per manure tree each day to pick fruit.

    Hint. sort your fruit before freezing, your best fruit lay out on trays and freeze for 2-3 hrs, then bag, you can then use them in small amounts, sub-quality fruit I throw in a bag and use for jams or cordial during the year, Have also made a vodka mulberry drink which is pretty good, getting better all the time....hmmmmm

    https://www.foodista.com/recipe/5QJDCSC3/mulberry-vodka-cordial

    Baz

    You can get dwarf rootstock trees too.
     
  11. SueUSA

    SueUSA Junior Member

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    Are there any names for the dwarfing rootstocks?

    Sue
     
  12. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Okay, you guys talked me into it. I have been noticing them in the catalogs, and they have always appealed. Bil, what a pretty tree! And what a pretty garden! Bazman, thanks for the freezing tip. That probably works for most berries, doesn't it? I usually get a horrible glob because I don't do that! Now I know!
     

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