Mischiefs' Folly

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by mischief, Sep 26, 2013.

  1. helenlee

    helenlee Junior Member

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    I think it fitting to post "Bitchpoem" at this point ...

    Um ... perhaps I should post it on my wall in case anyone takes a fence (sic) ... thanks kp : )
     
  2. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Still waiting for the plumber to show up. We had a good splash of rain again and I couldnt help but feel sad watching it Not pouring into my tank. Have to wait for them to finish the job they are already on. Still, it gives me more time to make sure I have enough to cover everything including unforeseen issues.

    I found the reason why I had such a heavy re-infestation of convovulus throughout the backyard. That weedmat I put down everywhere for the paths.
    The convovulus snuck in from the back fence, hit the weedmat and turned it into a highway from hell.
    Sooo, if you have a runner type weed, dont use weedmat for paths.
    This has been pulled up and all the surface runners are now drying out to a frizzle, probably havent got all of it but with making sure it didnt get to flower and set seed and removing one hell of alot of runners, I should be able to make head way with it. Having the whole area heavily mulched might have meant that alot of things didnt self sow the way I thought they would, but it also meant the runners mostly seemed to run just underneath the mulch and apart from where there was the odd branch in the way, seemed to have come out with not too much swearing.
    I am still going to spray next season. I have been told where to get the organic spray that the organic farmers use. Not much point spraying it now I suppose, with it just about ready to go dormant soon.

    I've been pottering about marking out where the planter boxes outside to toolshed and glasshouse will go for the umteenth time. I think I finally have the symmetry right now. There had to be Just enough path space to comfortable get into the shed or glasshouse, with the rest in planter boxes. I think its going to look bloody good and be workable.
    I am glad I spent so much time checking and doodling and remeasuring before I finally got the water tank delivered. Everything-the tank, the narrow bed around it, the path,terrace,toolshed and glasshouse all fit together with very little wasted space.

    I was going to start barrowing the tank soil out of the spare compost bin to level up the slightly hollow bit behind the tank but decided to think about things aliitle more and wound up laying out a central bed with paths running around it instead,using the pavers to mark it all out-play while you think.
    That soil is basically empty dirt compared to what is in the existing beds and what will go into the planter boxes so I dont want to shovel in and then change my mind and have to shovel out again.

    I'm going back to the wide bed system I used to use when the kids and I first moved in and put in our first garden. I'm definitely keeping at least one central bed divided into four four foot wide beds. My experiment last autumn with the Oats, showed me that I found the five foot wide beds difficult to work with.
    These had been hand planted not broadcast, which might have been abit easier, but I want to know how many plants would go in each bed after reading John Jeavons' book.

    The Oatstraw from that experiment was great. After I harvested and threshed it, the straw was tossed willy nilly over the bed and even now is still a lovely, thick golden mulch with the soil soft and moist underneath, even when other parts of the garden are bone dry down a couple of feet- I checked in a couple of empty spots. These last two years have been hellishly dry.

    The long bed in front of the hedge is tagged so far, as somewhere to plant fruit trees and grow bee plants and pumpkins. The bit right down the back is a blank spot on my doodle pad so far due that dratted walnut tree.

    These central beds will be 5 metres long and my pottering about today showed the path between them will line up nicely with the path from the back steps. Just dithering now as to whether or not I really need the second one or not and if not, what the hell do I do with that space.(talking to myself now, I should probably put the second one in and if I dont need it for my vegies, I could use it to grow some sort of grain crop for either me or the chooks).
    I'm not even looking at the back part of the yard til next spring-this has been sown down with mustard and broad beans. When I get some Borage seed from a friend, that will go there too.That should keep it happy for a while and the bees will just love it later on.

    I spoke with my neighbour about the glasshouse and asked him if he would be interested in helping me build it after the winter season and thankfully, he was quite keen. Thats going to be a challenge. I know how I would like it to be but not too sure how to do it or whether or not I should use some of the pavers as the base of the walls where the inground beds will be. Still in the thinking stage.

    With all these pavers I have to hand, I started playing with the idea of using them to edge all the beds starting with the garden side of the one I made the retaining wall for going round to the glasshouse.
    After todays' playtime, I am getting excited about having enough to edge all the paths and may even have enough to have them two high at least around the central beds and the long hedge one.
    I'm going to have to get good at concreting for this to keep looking good, nothing worse than weeds growing through bricks, except convovulus growing under weedmat.lol
     
  3. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    My 'season' is slowly coming to an end and I have been contemplating my navel alittle more than I normally do, enjoying what I have achieved and working out next years strategy while I wait patiently for my over worked plumber to arrive and work his magic. In other words, having a bit of a holiday.

    My most momentous achievement this year is happy neighbours.
    One has a lovely new fence to look at, another doesnt have to listen to my rooster crow all day on his day off and is looking forward to sharing avocados in spring; the third has a low hedge to look over and is delighted with the 'lovely' view. I did ask him what they thought of the idea of replacing the hedge with rosemary and was surprised at how keen they were. A friend thinks its a wonderful idea and has decided to take heaps of cutting of their beautiful rosemary for me for this to plant out in spring.(OMG! more digging).

    I can park in the back yard now without having to worry about getting stuck, have nice airy woodshed that lets the firewood dry out properly so I am not burning wet wood, a retaining wall to separate the parking area from the driveway, a nice terrace to sit on to enjoy the scenery, which does feel rather special. A friend was given an umbrella that they dont like cos it has flowers on it and thinks it will be absolutely perfect for up here. That will give us some much needed shade here which will make this area just about perfect. And I'm almost there on being able to collect rainwater in the tank so I can stop feeling guilty about watering such a large garden.

    After 18 years, I finally got to grow peaches that I could eat and have harvested the first lot of chestnuts- all 27 of them. Then there is the home grown firewood,while less than I thought, was still a milestone, especially as I learned new ways of making use of twigs, branches and leaves for kindling.

    The final old concrete laundry tub arrived and has just been filled with compost and topped with a nice leafy mulch all ready for the herbs to be transplanted into when it cools down abit.

    I also realised that I had, perhaps obviously to others, violated a primary rule of start small and get it right before moving on.
    This year has mostly been about fixing that up,bit by bit and I think I have done quite well on this. Definitely more to go on this one.

    It has been mentioned that some of the family do miss having a lawn and that it would be nice for the kids to be able to play on one here. Sort of made me realise that I need to take into account what my family would like rather than just focus on what I would like.
    While they love the idea of the courtyard with its pizza oven,(next years project) and that they can just go collect dinner fresh from the garden, there is something to be said for rolling around on grass.(apparently. personally, I havent noticed the lack, but then I am not 8 either).

    It didnt take much to work out I could work that in and make it look good. I had been puzzling over how to deal with the very back of the section due to the neighbours walnut tree. So this area has now been set aside for that.
    A quick review of my doodle pad confirmed that the area that runs along the front of the hedge would be well suited to garden space so There will still be lots of room to grow things that need room to spread or mass plantings like potatoes or corn/grains.

    The area I thought would be good to put the glasshouse on has been harvested,cleared and leveled so I can properly mark out and measure to make sure it will fit. It looks good, but thats another project for next year now. Meanwhile, its been sown in naked barley and covered to protect it from all types of birds and should be ready to harvest about the time I'm ready to start building.
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Great work mischief. I don't sit and take stock of my achievements anywhere near often enough. It's good to remind yourself of what you have done, not just what the next job is.
     
  5. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    I've been spending all my spare time reading up on bees of all sorts. Honey, bumble and natives.
    Talk about an eye opener and the diverse opinions as to what is best!!!
    I almost joined the nz beeks forum til I noticed afew derogatory comments about us so called newbie hobbist people who think we know better than the old hands. hmm, I'll just wait alittle longer to make sure I've got my temper under control first. It has a nasty habit of running away on me.
    There is such a wealth of information out there though, its information overload at the moment.
    My lessons in this area have come to an end due to cold weather setting in so I consul myself by having a honey sandwich using my jr of honey I was given for helping spin it out in the extractor. Its liquid sunshine!! Cant wait for honey from my place.

    My catalogue from Southernwoods nursery arrived and I have been trawling through it trying to work out which plants would be best to add for all the different sorts of bees- I have to have a Luisa and prune plum as well.
    The Luisa is the heart shaped one I mentioned a little while ago. It is supposed to produce fruit every year rather than bi annually like the others.yum

    I have been contemplating whether or not I would get away with planting out the grass verge between the rock wall and the public footpath in low growing natives.
    They would have to be low so the neighbours and I can see to get out of our driveways. That last little patch of grass than needs to be mowed every now and then, I'm sure it would be better planted out in something nicer.

    With the water tank, I ran into a spot of bother, a couple actually. they are still working on a large job and managed to get enough time away from it to replace the gutter along the back of the house before leaving again, meaning I had to haul out one of the 200L barrels to stop the rain from scouring out the ground beneath it.
    Because I am so far behind in my reno's- havent got the extension built between the porch and the old shed, I have had to create an aquaduct for the down pipes to run along in order for the rain to get to the tank.....it doesnt look too bad...one day I will laugh at this but not right now. Its almost like daylight savings ended and winter started the next day. We have had so much rain over the last few weeks and none of it is in my tank.
    Hopefully the guys will be back next week to finish connecting everything.
    Still, I am a year ahead of target in getting the tank anyway so that is a plus point I suppose.
     
  6. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    with projects like that i figure an extra year or two to get the fine tuning done... : ) hang in there.

    not sure there are any complete books similar to the Holdobler and Wilson _The Ants_ but if there is it would be worth it.

    i'm sure almost any useful open forum will contain a few people who are less than friendly or helpful, just gotta figure 'em out and ignore them if they get under your skin. it always helps to read a few thousand messages first before posting just to see who's who and such.
     
  7. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Agreed. I'm going to take my time, well, try to anyway.
    I might still build one top bar hive at the end of winter so its ready for spring. I want to see if a swarm will move in.
    Meanwhile, I'm taking copious notes.

    This morning we had our first real frost for the year and I am wondering if I should take my chances with the avocados staying put on the tree or cut them off now and hope they have grown enough to ripen properly. Maybe I should cut one first to see how it goes.

    The first lot of Feijoas have dropped and for a change I have some whoppers. The tree growing closest to the neighbours walnut tree doesnt seem to have any on it at all. The really large ones have all come off the main branch furtherest away from the walnut. Not much I can do about it. I do wish they had cut this walnut down rather than the one on the other side of their yard though, as much as I like walnuts.

    I might have to hunt the neigbours cat. I think it has caught another of the hens, there seems to be yet one more missing and it is the wrong time of the year for them to have gone broody somewhere.
     
  8. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    I couldnt help myself, I cut off one of the Avocado and now have it sitting in the kitchen waiting to see if it is old enough to ripen properly.
    I noticed that there were heaps of little fruit on the tree and decided that it wont be such a big deal if it isnt ready. Its been hard to find any info on how to tell when to harvest. I think most people probably know what sort they have to start off with, which would have helped, but as this was grown from a seed,(by my nana), I dont know. I think its a Fuerte.

    The very small fruit are about an inch long and straight. They dont seem to get that rounded avo look til they are alot bigger.
    Now, just to pray we have a reasonably mild winter with no seriously hard frosts or they will all fall off.

    I found a use for some of the old gutters in a book my dad brought down for me. I hvent had a chance to try it out yet.
    You cut it into lengths the same/slightly smaller than the width of your beds, fill 'em up with compost, jam a couple of pots in each end to stop the soil form falling out and sow things like PEAS in it. When they are about 20cm you tke out to the garden, make a wide deep enough drill and lower one end in, remove the pot at that end and slide the gutter out of the way so that it settles into the drill, then firm it down.
    HA! I might be able to grow peas I can eat now instead of feeding them to the snails.
    I did actually have another attempt this year with them, before I read this little tidbit. They are just coming up under a chick mesh cover and so far look good- well protected from the occasional loose chook, but still at risk from slugs and snails.

    I should have a few metres left over from reusing the old house gutters on the woodshed so I am going to give it a go.

    The cabbage tree prunings I have stuck in a tub of water have three that have either started growing a nice bunch of leaves. One only seems to have grown some roots...?
    These are going to be planted at each end of the Pear tree beds, which means......I had to remove all the pavers I had put at one end to get them out of the way.

    That is what I did on my one day off....lugged pavers yet again.
    I wanted to see if I had enough to edge all the garden beds, so thats where they all went.
    The first bed had been edged while ago to see if I liked the look of it, which I did.
    I have enough to do the lot including a three course high along the front of the bed that has the hedge behind it. This has annoying sloped bits at the moment and I wanted to somehow level the whole thing.
    I made sure that there were enough to finish the back steps and the little curved wall.

    Looks like I will become a brickie this year.
     
  9. Chookie

    Chookie Junior Member

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    Thanks for sharing mischief, great read and some good ideas :y:
     
  10. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    :)

    Well, I had an interesting day.
    I was supposed to go to work but my truck broke down half way there.
    After hitch hiking home again, calling the boss to let him know I was still alive( this is the first time in 12 years that I havent got to work so I knew they would worry) and the garage to go pick up my truck, I was in a bit of a tizz.
    Too many hours later, I get to learn that my truck motor is history.
    I had had the rings 'done' afew weeks ago and now, some how some little bolt split causing the rod thingy to drive itself through the top of my engine splitting it in two.
    They called their insurance company.........I have exactly 3 days to find another truck so I can get to my 'Day Job'.
    So, if anyone in the North Island has a petrol ute in good nick for sale, I'd like to know(now!).

    To burn off some surplus energy, I decided to get physical in the backyard.
    I decided to pull out yet more weedmat from the shed and lay it down on the curved path around the water tank.
    Because the gardens in this area are not going to be dug over very often, I decided that I wouldnt concrete the pavers in place, just dig down alittle and nestle the weedmat underneath the. Because of the curve, I had to pleat the weedmat every so often to get it to go around the bend- much like I was feeling at the time.
    These pleated bits got a wire staple I made from left overs from running wires for the grapevines. This stops the gravel/crusher dust from working its way into the pleat and lifting the matting up.
    The crusher dust was then lugged over and raked over the whole thing. Actually looks quite good. It definitely needs quite abit bit more gravelly stuff but so far so good and I feel better after a reasonable workout.
     
  11. helenlee

    helenlee Junior Member

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    Oh bloody hell ... I clicked on this thread & somehow didn't notice it took me to the first page rather than the most recent. I was reading & reading & reading, with my eyes popping out of my head, thinking "Geez ... mischief has been really busy!" :)

    I'm really sorry to hear about your truck. That seriously sucks. Do you mean your mechanics insurance is going to pay to replace the vehicle? I blew up a car once when I did a timing chain ... that was a major bummer : (
     
  12. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    haha, glad I'm not the only one who does that.
    It been a busy year.
    I actually wrote up all the things I got done around here and I was impressed.
    My dad came down for a wee holiday forgetting that I work all winter,but still had a relaxing time of it.
    When I showed him my latest plan, he seemed a bit miffed."Your always changing your mind!'

    I bit my tongue and did not state the obvious.

    1. Its evolving not changing.

    2. A womans' prerogative is to change her mind.

    I see this as an ability to (eventually) recognise something just aint working and that you can take stubborn/persistent too far.
    After a day of wandering around, he decided that the chook yards were well built and logical,the new bed layout will work and is certainly going to be alot less work and even with only one bed at that time edged, is looking good.

    It doesnt look like a dogs breakfast any more. Mind you, taking shit loads of somebody elses junk to the dump certainly helped make it more pleasurable to be in.

    I'm not too sure, the poor (and by the sounds of it, will be poor) mechanic was sort of rambling when he told me what the problem was with the truck. I think we were both abit in shock.
    I thought the gearbox had fallen apart cos thats sort of what it sounded like. He was pretty much saying a part they put in blew apart which should mean their insurance should cover it.... then he mentioned $1000 excess.
    It wasnt til I got off the phone and started to wonder just who is supposed to be paying the excess. Surely he didnt think I should.
    I'll call my insurer in the morning and find out what I should do. This is a new situation for me.
    I like my old truck, its never given me any trouble til now. I'd really like for it to be back on the road and purring again.
     
  13. helenlee

    helenlee Junior Member

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    "I actually wrote up all the things I got done around here and I was impressed. "
    You should try reading it from the beginning. It's absolutely bloody awesome :) :) :)

    What sort of truck is it? Is the engine the original one?
    I can't see how you'd be responsible for the excess, but then again I'm not a lawyer, & I'm not a mechanic ... I'm just a sheila who usually ends up on the rough end of the pineapple when things like this happen :/
    Has anyone mentioned dropping a new motor into it? Get the mechanic to ring around the wreckers & see how much a good one would cost.

    Nice your Dad has decided you've got half a clue what you're doing : ) Of course it's evolving : ) Everything is evolving : ) Things that are static are dead : ) Permaculture can be a bit hard to get a grip on for people who are used to things (gardens, chook pens, women) looking like they did in the 40's 50's & 60's : ) Go easy on him ... you catch more flies with honey than you do with vinegar : )
     
  14. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Its a Mitsubishi L200.....old, 1988 8) went beautifully for the four years I've had it.
    The one before that was the same make and model but a couple of years older. With that one I did get a reconditioned motor dropped in, cost me $8500, two years later my ex wrote it off in a traffic accident and no he didnt give me a hand to replace it because as far as he was concerned, the accident happened cos the brakes failed and made me believe that as the owner I should have maintained it better.
    (I realised much later that he is probably The Most worse driver I have ever known and while the brakes may have been soft, I now doubt they did fail).
    My insurance company replaced it.That in itself is a story worth recounting. (Hope I can pull it off again)

    I had three days to find a truck,same as now.
    Not knowing what to do, I thought, "Right, first things first. Go see the insurer and take it from there."
    So off we went.
    On the way back home I drove a different route out of town which just happened to have a car sales yard on a corner..... and there was my truck sitting waiting patiently for me to go buy it.
    I pulled in did the paper work,went down the road and took out my tax setasides money for a deposit and a couple of hours drove home in time to load up for the weekends' work.
    Actually I had a job on friday afternoon at that time and even managed to get to that one on time.

    I put it down to trusting in the Universe and being pro-active, as opposed to sitting on my arse feeling sorry for myself.

    I will pop in to see my lucky insurer on my way home from work this afternoon and sort my side of it out.oops time to go to work
     
  15. helenlee

    helenlee Junior Member

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    That is an awesome story. I'm pretty sure I have to meet you : )I think we'd have a lot to talk about : )
    Yeah sitting on your arse feeling sorry for yourself is kinda self defeating. And as I've discovered this past year, it just gives you a bigger arse, which is the last thing you need when you're feeling shit house anyway ; )

    As for second hand cars - really good ones are like hens teeth, & when you find one it's worth hanging on to. I've had 2 ... a 1987 diesel LandCruiser that went forever & ever without missing a beat until someone who will remain nameless caused its demise, & an old Mitsubishi station wagon that was unstoppable & handled rough winding dirt roads like a rally car : )

    Check out "trademedotconz" ... I had a look this morning & there are a few the same model as yours - although I don't know if yours is petrol or diesel?

    Have an awesome day at work, whatever you're doing : )
     
  16. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Oh, so thats where I went wrong.
    I did wonder what happened to my lovely butt.
     
  17. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    I have been avidly reading through the HoneyBeeSuite.com blog and just had to share this bit from it.

    ......."Greetings to all who be fair. Since time immemorial, I have served mankind as a pollinator of plants and a producer of propolis, wax, royal jelly, and honey. In turn, you have protected me from skunks, wasps, bears, and hornets. You have fed me when flowers were scarce, watered me when seasons were dry. It hasn’t always been peaceable, but the truce has worked as long as you respected my rights and taken not more than your share.
    I serve as long as I am healthy and comfortable. I thrive when you treat me not as your servant, but as your friend. If you become a keeper of my kind, remember that keeping entails responsibility. If you want me to live in a place of your choosing, at a time of your choosing, in a hive of your choosing, you must care for me.

    The “live and let die” philosophy—you live and let me die—is not beekeeping; it is bee abuse. A decision to keep me is a burden you choose, an albatross you carry. If you will not care for me, if my presence is troublesome, you must let me go free.

    Don’t confuse your interests with mine. What you want and what I want are not the same. You must separate the two and compromise, as must I. For you it is sweetness and light, money for the till, pollination of your crops. For me, it is the survival of my sisters, my colony, my species.

    Like you, I am a living, breathing animal. I feel hunger, thirst, and pain. I have good days and bad; my strength ebbs and flows. I have a right to abundant flowers. I have a right to unlimited water. I have a right to air free of contaminants. I have a right to quietude, peace, and respect.

    I realize that all humans do not think alike, nevertheless, each beekeeper must plot a course and follow it. Just like each of you raises your children differently—cultures, values, religions, diets—you will keep bees differently. Although I accept those differences and do not require you to choose one regimen over the other, you must have a plan. You must be informed and empathetic. In short, you must care.

    Do not keep me if you are in love only with the idea of it. Do not keep me because it makes you look cool or because you want to call yourself a beekeeper. Keep me because you love me and because you care about my health, my environment, and my future. Do not put me where I am too hot, too cold, too dry, or too wet. Do not ignore me when I am sick. Do not abandon me when I become inconvenient.

    To care for me you must care about the planet. To insist the earth is not warmer, though warmer it is; to pretend the summers are not dryer though dryer they are; to proclaim the crops are not toxic, though toxic they’ve become is to ignore reality. But you can fool only yourself. You cannot fool me. No, you cannot fool the honey bee.

    Discrimination must end. You humans know, after all, that you cannot restrict a race of your own kind to the back of the bus, to an internment camp, to a reservation. Likewise, you cannot legislate my environment away. You cannot decide your fancy cities, gated communities, or expensive subdivisions are too good for my kind. You cannot lock me out because I may, for short times, become a nuisance.

    Genocide must end. Spraying my home, my food, my water, my air with weapons of mass insect destruction only proves that humans are arrogant—unaware that they, too, are part of life’s interdependency. A human who believes he does not need a bee is destined for the Darwin award.

    Pollution must end. Climate change must end. Fragmentation of the landscape must end. To be a keeper of my kind is to be a steward of the natural world, for I am nothing without the meadows; I am nothing without the deserts and woodlands; I am nothing without the prairies, hedgerows and swamps. I am nothing without flowers, and nothing without trees. But I am not nothing.

    No, I am far from nothing. I provide you with food and fiber and fuel. I provide you with beauty and beef and butter. I provide you with spice and squash, cotton and cucumbers. As long as you care for me and my environment, I will continue to pollinate your world in exchange for mere nips of nectar and a pittance of pollen. But if you are unwilling to compromise; if you are unwilling to provide for me as I provide for you, then I can make no promises. Remember, my kind can live without yours, but can you say the same?
    I ask you on this National Honey Bee Day to think about me, to think about you, and decide how we can work together for a better, cleaner, happier world.

    Yours from the hive,

    Honey B."

    Thank you Rusty for this, just love it!!
    Here is the link.
    https://www.honeybeesuite.com/blog/page/30/
     
  18. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Yesterday, I picked up the avocado for its daily check and though it felt alittle soft. I gently poked its button and it gave way just alittle.....so I ate it all up.
    It was very edible,lovely smooth texture with no rubberyness at all. Quite sweet in one part, which I was not expecting, but did have a more watery ripeness to it than the normal oily sort I am accustomed to.
    It probably could have been left another day or two but...mmmmm
    I am going to haul the ladder out so I can cut off the other big one I saw. I dont have the truck to stand on at the moment and dont dare do that to the garages' truck cos it doesnt have the grill at the back of the cab like mine does.

    I am down to two chicks- the other rooster-chick is definitely not there- bit of a mixed blessing.I am going to ask Santa for a water cannon for Xmas so I can harass the neighbours cat with it.

    While I was searching under the bears' breeches in one of the forage yards, I came across the Ivory raspberry that I had forgotten about. It still had two very unusually coloured fruit on it, both very sweet and very rapsberry-y. Not too sure why I thought it would taste differently.
    Some bird or other has obviously found it too cos I found quite afew 'empties' on the stems.. I didnt realise that it fruited so late.
    This plant is definitely going to be chopped up for cuttings.

    The Feijoa tree that dropped the whoppas has decided to flower again.???
    Not too sure what that is all about, we've even had a couple of frosts, so I dont understand what is going on with it.It has never flowered this time of year before, going to wait and see what happens next with it.

    The little lemon tree has had to be propped up with stakes due to just about as many fruit ripening as it has leaves. It was probably a dumb move to leave it with flowers/fruit so young but as I feed it regularly I'm hoping it will be okay.

    I dug up and moved the Asparagus plant that was in the way of the new path, I didnt realise that its roots spread so wide and might have cut off alittle more than I should have which is unfortunate. I wont know til spring, whether or not I have killed it and will have to be alittle more careful with moving the one growing in the way of the glasshouse.

    The chooks are still laying 2-3 eggs a day. "Red' has obviously started up again. She lays the dinkiest 'girly eggs' as my friends daughter calls them. I save these for her seeing as she loves them so much.

    My wee crop of peas are still alive and growing well beneath their mesh protector, fingers crossed for actually getting to eat some of these in the not too distant future.

    The kiwifruit has dropped all its leaves and the Mulberry is not far behind so these will start getting a hair cut top and bottom to get them ready for being moved.
    Its too hot for the Mulberry where it is and I have been told, too moist for the Kiwifruit where it is, so the Mulberry will be going where the Kiwifruit is to take advantage of the cooler moister ground and the K/f will go in the fourth yard next to the scratch yard.
    I've given up trying to work out how to make a (safe and stable) barrel trellis over the scratch yard and have opted instead to a basic pitched triangle. Must be getting tired, I cant think what the right word for that is at the moment.

    Somebody mentioned that they had heard of a lady who breeds silk worms in NZ. I want to grow more mulberries but cant see where I could possibly put them, unless I invade my mothers yard with them.
    I love the idea of having silk or even just silk thread to play with.
    I'll have to see if I can find this person and learn more about these wonderful creatures.
     
  19. helenlee

    helenlee Junior Member

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    Any advice on picking avocados greatly accepted. I think mine's a Haas? Well it looks like a Haas ...
    What on earth is the accepted practice for picking them?
    And can you store them any way? I had a huge glut of them this year ... but now they are all gone & I was facing a drought (or paying an arm & a leg for a dodgy looking one in the shop) : /
    Luckily a neighbour has offered me some of his ... must be a different variety ...
     
  20. helenlee

    helenlee Junior Member

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    Re: the feijoa flowering out of season ... I've read a few facebook posts about that lately. Lots of plants & animals that are out of sync with their usual rhythm. I had some jonquils flower a couple of months ago! I've had clover in the paddocks for about 16 months straight now - no burn off in summer & no frosting off in winter!
     

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