Mischiefs' Folly

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by mischief, Sep 26, 2013.

  1. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    you're welcome, i think it wise to consult with an engineer when it comes
    to larger projects, most are happy to do it and i've known several to just
    ignore fees for something simple as they consider it a community service.

    the rock/crusher dust sounds like a fairly good thing to do too as that will
    act as a more uniform footing for the tank, but i would still site the tank on
    either wholely undisturbed subsoil or uniformly newly disturbed and then
    recompacted soil.

    for me the digging around here is a form of exercise in both muscle and spirit. my back likes the exercise. :) we made good progress today and were able to get the trench somewhat filled back in (after putting in the desired drain tubes). so tonight's rain (soon to be here by the looks of the radar) will help settle things down and give all the plants/critters a welcome drink. *whew!*
     
  2. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Yesterday, the digger finally arrived, hopefully for the last time. The tanks' floor got dug out further away from the house so we know it is on stable and consistent subsoil. My archaeological dig got filled in....I was kinda thinking about keeping up with that just to see what else they had thrown in there, but once again sanity prevailed.(and we needed the space to put the dirt thats going back in to fill the gap up.)

    While the diggerman went off to get rid of a surplus load of soil, I was trying to make sure the area was flat to within 5mm as instructed...with my spade and level, much to the amusement of Mr digger when he came back, but hey I got almost a quarter of it done and wasnt too far off. I didnt know how to use his fancy gadget and didnt dare with him not there in case it got broken.
    I learnt how to level an area using a laser thingy and my job was to spray a blue dot where it said it was level, so there were all these little dots scattered across the whole circle, then the digger carefully scraped the surplus off and filled in the odd dip. Much faster.

    I think he might have said something about my being picky when he went off to morning tea, cos the boss and my rep popped in the check things out....they had an urgent call for some sand and needed him to take the load over, so off he went muttering about messing up his time sheet.lol.
    I actually know the boss and know he doesnt normally just turn up. They have this ingenious device called a mobile phone they use instead.
    He was also able to look at the hole and work out for us how much crusher dust to put down.
    This isnt actually dust at all, but very fine grey chip, not sure what sort of stone it is.

    I had an idea we were in for a heavy down pour over the weekend(learning to listen to my intuition). Mr digger looked at me, looked at the beautifully clear blue sky and probably wondered why on earth I would think that on such a stinking hot day, but he just shrugged and popped off to get his compactor, suggesting I call the tank company to see if they could bring the delivery date forward to today and to carefully replace some of the soil around the edge of the crusher dust, packing it down abit, so if there was a heavy down pour, the rain wouldnt wash it out of place. I'm sure he thought I was a nutter but, too bad.

    Not too sure what the tank company thought,poor people. First I call to say hang off abit we found the septic tank, then hang off a bit we found an air raid shelter, now I call and say, can you bring it tomorrow cos I dont want the rain ruining my new tank floor.
    Very obliging people they are at Bowers and sons.

    After the digging and rock laying got done, I had to cut down part of the plum tree that was going to be in the way of the tank. Mum had bought herself a little chainsaw but hadnt used it yet so I borrowed it to check it out.....couldnt start the bloody thing.
    I think she'll need to take it back or get them to show her how to start the stupid thing. I wound up pulling my electric one out of the tool shed and used that instead.
    The thinner branches got tied down out of the way using the heavy cut offs as the weight, only broke one branch I wanted to keep so that wasnt too bad although the poor tree does look alittle ragetty.

    This morning I get up and its a cold very grey day, completely different to yesterday and it did look like we were in for nasty weather, so I was relieved today was the big day.
    This afternoon, the ground started vibrating as the delivery truck made its way slowly up the drive.
    With the work we had already done on the driveway and parking area he had no trouble at all getting in- so glad I hadnt built the woodshed cos he did need the space.

    They use a bar- more a heavy square tubing with 4 thick straps attached to hoist the tank off the truck and into its new home.
    There was just one spot that needed a little bit dug out so the extending feet had enough room. These take the weight of the truck and tank while the hoist is in action, actually lift the trucks tyres off the ground abit and a nifty control panel to direct the hoist, wireless, so the operator could walk around and check the tank was going where it was supposed to without having to run backwards and forwards.

    Cos the hole was dug out alittle wider than I really wanted, they were able to just walk completely around the tank and unhitch it. All in all, it got lined up and put into place quite fast.
    When they had said it would take only half an hour, I thought that was going to be pushing it, but no, they were back down the drive and gone in probably less time than that.

    (big sigh),then I had to start filling in the gap before it got wet and heavy.
    I use my famous canoe paddling digging method to do this sort of thing. Stand with your back to the hole and stab downwards then flick the spadeful off behind you. It doesnt seem to use so much energy doing it this way, but of course you can only really use it for filling holes or getting dirt/bark off a trailer.
    So far I've only managed to fill in about a third before the rain set in and I, thankfully, had to stop.

    It feels like a major achievement getting this thing finally here. It does stand out but I'm sure once the mountain of dirt is put back in place and it gets painted,with the steps to the garden curving around it and some strategic plantings, its going nestle in really well.
     
  3. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    congrats! :)
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    That casual statement right there tells me that feminism is alive and well in your family! You go girls! Matching chainsaws....

    So is it all connected up and ready to start collecting water?
     
  5. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Well not quite matching chainsaws. Mine is an electric one, my dad bought it for me when I needed to chop up the walnut tree for firewood.....but at least it goes every time. I do have another that my son gave me when he moved to Brisbane. He had been given it by his father in law and couldnt take it. I doubt he had even used it cos it was the old sort that doesnt have a safety guard. I find that one too heavy to use.

    Mum tells me that I bring the feminist out in her.
    I dont think its being a feminist to have good tools or be able to do things for yourself, I always thought of it as man hating bra burners but I suppose that was afew generations ago now.
    Actually, we females do have alot to be thankful to those 'crazies', if it wasnt for them we would probably still be married off before 21..... thinking about the lot of women from those days, we take an awful lot for granted, rights and responsibilities they only dreamed of.

    Yes, the next thing is rerunning the gutters and hooking it all up.
    I did ask the plumber who was working on the neighbours gutters to take a look and give me a quote. I explained what I wanted done, including that I want the far end of the front gutter put at the wrong angle so the birds still had their birdbath, but because I could see which side of the house to run the front one down to the back of the house, he said to call him when I figured out what I wanted and didnt even give me an hourly rate.
    hmmm,guys expect us to know what we want all the time now, even on subjects we are not experts on. I wanted him to TELL me which way was best or easiest so this feminism thing isnt always working out.
    Now, I am working out how I can do it myself. The back gutter looks pretty straight forward and that might be done first, just to get some water into the tank, while the front one gets worked out.

    Recommended rule to all guys when asked for quotes by female clients.....give them a quote not just your card; better still, give them your quote ON your card. Tell them what they need to know about the work they want done and to help them decide that you are the right tradesman for their job.....or they will try to do it themselves and you may only get the nasty bit they couldnt do, which in my case will be working up on a scaffold to rerun the front gutter-its 4 metres off the ground and with an uneven surface beneath it.
    Not a pleasant prospect.

    While I m thinking about how to do it and getting abit of dosh for the gutters, I still have a mountain of soil to move and the chook pens to finish.
    I've got the posts in for the dividing fence between the two back pens up and one rail on and I have one wall that has been sound proofed now too. Doing that has made a huge difference to how loud the rooster is when he is crowing first thing in the morning on his perch- cant hear him from inside and very faint from outside. I'm going to put a door on with a gap between the bottom of the door and the ground and I m going to put a lock on it.I am sure we had eggs go missing and think it might have been the dodgy neighbour down the back.
     
  6. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Finally, that mountain of soil is now back where it belongs around the tank. I thought this was never going to end and there was way too much of it but all there is now is a little 1foot by 2 metre pile that is needed to level the back corner of one of the chooks forage yards. Yay!

    All of the 'mountain' that had been put up on the garden side disappeared like magic down the hole. When I looked at what was still in the courtyard, my shoulders slumped. It just looked like too much, but by the time I had leveled the ground in front of the tank again, I could see that if I built a little retaining wall between the tank and where the outdoor kitchen will go, there wouldnt be much left at all and there isnt.

    I'm quite pleased with this idea actually. I grabbed a couple of old posts from my 'recycling centre'-really the fourth of the chooks forage yards, cut up some of the wrong retaining wall timber and banged it all together.
    I couldnt decide how tall this buffer should be so the posts are still full height til I decide.One problem I ran into was the soil kept spilling down in front of the tank. I needed something to hold it in place but didnt want to use the timber offcuts, that just looked wrong.
    Back to the recycling centre for some of the old chicken wire of the dome.This got stapled to the front post and bent around so the bottom of the mesh lay on the soil already there.
    Once I started filling this up and carefully tamping it down, the weight of the soil on the floor of the mesh 'bag' stopped it from falling into the courtyard.Its not exactly neat and tidy yet.

    The top of this little bank is going to be a little herb garden and already has the chives and garlic chives planted in it. I'll let the soil in the mesh settle abit and then plant it with different types of thyme,making a wall of thyme, just to be different.
    I noticed a little plant of Italian parsley growing nearby which I will transplant at the bottom of this where is wont matter if it grows as big as the last plant.

    The lavendars that will be planted around the bottom of the tank are doing well in their pots. I was alittle worried about these over winter cos they looked like they were dying, but they have green up again nicely.
    Not too sure what to do for the edging of this little garden-to-be. I'm leaning towards using some of the paving stones stood end up.These are the driveway paving stones that my son in law got for me. There is a small mountain of these as well, but not nearly enough to pave the parking are with and I'm not going to buy more to do this now, its way too expensive.
    Behind the outdoor kitchen, at the top of the bank, I'm going to put in a hedge of Rosemary-Tuscan blue. I might put in another one between the parking area and the courtyard too.

    "Gutters? Eco, why didnt I get the gutters done while I was waiting for the tank to go in?" I asked myself.
    Um, that would have been logical, wouldnt it, but I didnt think about that.I did have an awful lot of other things grabbing my time.
    Oh well, once I tidy up the courtyard, I can start on that.
    I dont think I need to rerun the gutters along the front of the house, just tweak the end where the downpipe already is so this can be run along the side of the house to the back.

    Ah, I know why I conveniently forgot to get this done now.
    All the aluminium conservatory pieces are leaning up against the woodshed right where the pipe to the tank needs to go.....so I have to find a new home for that, or build the glasshouse so its out of the way.....story of my life.....go to do something but something is in the way so you have to do that first in order to do what you wanted to start with.

    The family is coming down for the Big family day this year and I am hoping to get some help building the outdoor kitchen. So far I have exactly one marine hand pump(somewhere) and thats it.
    I have always wanted a Real pizza oven,an outdoor sink and bench and a BBQ. Now I cant decide whether to have a go at the rocket stove thing as well as or instead of the BBQ.
    I will be able to get the proper clay for the pizza oven through my potter brother and my son-in-law is a BBQ Expert and also interested in rocket stoves, so this will give us something to play with over Xmas.
     
  7. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Postmodern feminism is much more about grandmas with their own chain saws than it is about hating men and burning bras. You need a good comfy bra on when you are operating a chain saw!
    And it isn't unreasonable to expect a tradie to give you some advice about what they think is best from their years of experience, but in the end you should get to say actually no, I want you to do it my way. The other tip is don't try to hit on your prospective client! And don't say - get your husband to ring me when he gets home….

    Your thyme wall sounds great!

    And at least you are at risk of being bored any time soon.
     
  8. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    haha,
    That reminds me of the first time I went to a hardware store,told them what I wanted to do and asked what I needed, they suggested I get my husband to go see them......righhtt!

    Boredom is a state of mindlessness. Life is too interesting when you get out from infront of the 'box' and take a look. Not likely to happen anytime soon, I have way too many projects on the trot.

    Today, I finished putting up the dividing fence between the two rear forage yards. The bottom has half length fence palings and the top is the orange (think gaudy) square plastic mesh that came from...somewhere?? and three bits of 'urbanite'(concrete rubble) fitted into the gap under the lower railing.

    And ....I made a gate for the main entrance to the chooks pen. I had to cos I needed the mesh that was on the temp one for the fence.
    This one isnt the same as the 'inspired by the Taranaki gate', that I made for the forage yards, its a real gate.
    I made it out of 2 pieces of old thinner railing that had started to twist most unbecomingly- I used the fairly straight bits and the last 9 fence palings. Took me hours to figure out how to get the zigzag bits cut so they fitted. (Thats to make sure it doesnt go pear shaped after its been hung)
    Had to use the hand saw for those cos I couldnt get the chop saw blade to turn so it could cut the 45 degree angle.

    Looks really good, but by goddess its heavy.

    There are a couple of problems with it.
    1 I made it so the pretty side with the upright palings in facing inside the pen and 2, I forgot to get heavy duty gate hinges from the hardware store when I popped down for more nails, so..... I have had to tie it up with rope til monday when I can go buy the hinges.
    At least I know it wont fall over and kill my chooks meanwhile.

    And that was my Sunday.
    I was supposed to do the housework but that will have to wait for a rainy day.( I need a wife, its a shame I'm not gay).
     
  9. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I have found that if you leave house work for long enough the urge to do it passes… Until guests announce an impending visit at least!

    I too have had the hardware moment. Wanted to buy a rack to hold the gumboots upside down. Don't make 'em luv. Get your hubby to knock one up for you…. Right I said - it's like this. What do I need and how do it make it because I haven't got the time to wait for Prince Charming to turn up. He rose to the challenge and got useful at that point. It's a bloody good boot rack too!
     
  10. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I have found that if you leave house work for long enough the urge to do it passes… Until guests announce an impending visit at least!

    I too have had the hardware moment. Wanted to buy a rack to hold the gumboots upside down. Don't make 'em luv. Get your hubby to knock one up for you…. Right I said - it's like this. What do I need and how do it make it because I haven't got the time to wait for Prince Charming to turn up. He rose to the challenge and got useful at that point. It's a bloody good boot rack too!
     
  11. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    My 'tidy' family know to give me at least a weeks notice before they arrive or suffer the consequences.....if they mention something needs to be done, they get handed the broom/vacum cleaner etc....

    I still have alittle bit of clay still in the courtyard, but only cos I have made the steps from the courtyard up to the garden. This curves up around the tank.
    I used the old half rounds from the old steps again for this. I did have to replace 4 of their pegs, they must have got buried or taken away when the tank hole got dug out. Luckily, I had some old aluminium poles to cut down to size for this. I have them at 2-3 times the height of the step and these are hammered in so they are just below the top of the step.

    I wanted the steps to be the same distance from the tank all the way round so I had to measure the gap between the concrete slab at the top and work backwards from there.
    Then I stood at the top and spaded a slope all the way down and raked that into a pile in the courtyard.
    I had to make sure the first step up was after where the downpipe to the tank goes to make sure the taller family members dont knock themselves out coming down the steps.
    Once I worked out where that would go, it was just a matter of banging in two pegs at each end of the half rounds, packing the soil in behind it to make it firm, leveling the soil behind that.

    I wanted a slightly wider garden between the tank and steps so I could fit the lavendar as well as a NZ ground cover, so this was marked out at 36cm compared to the 30cm in the courtyard. The side of the step nearest the tank was measured out at 33 cm and the end further away, at 42cm...or so.
    This worked out really well, all 5 steps fit perfectly and the top one doesnt extend past the edge of the concrete slab.
    The garden has been lined with the pavers. I laid them flat in the courtyard, it looked right that way. Having them set at an angle just looked too busy.
    The ones going up the side of the steps are stacked towards the rear of each step so the next lot are slightly above the level of their step.
    In line with each step is a paver that acts as a mini retaining wall to stop the rain from washing the soil out.

    I didnt really want to use this lot of soil in the chooks yard, so it all got tipped into the empty compost bin and will be spread around the garden when I have the time to deal with it.(took way less time to deal with it this way) The bin is full already, which is unfortunate, cos I still have soil to move and there will be yet more when I have to dig yet more out to put in the posts for the retaining wall that will help level the missing corner of the 'sundeck'. I was hoping to find some other way of dealing with this,like just having the bank planted out in carpetting thyme, but the odd shape of the concrete slab makes it feel too narrow.

    To give my back a rest from digging, I made a start cutting down all the regrown hedge along the boundary. The really long bits got taken over to the chooks central pen and placed crossways to shelter this area from the sun while it dried out. Hopefully the hops vine will find this just the thing to grow over and will make things alittle cooler during the summer heat.
    The short bits just got put up on the tank for later, from where they then blew across the yard when the wind blew a gale.
    So far I have managed to dig out about 2 metres of roots that are now drying for firewood. I gave up trying to cut or dig out the very first 'hedge' plant. Its trunk is about 45cm wide and is so old it has a lovely vine thing growing on it. When I get back to it, I'm just going to cut out the reasonably younger parts and then just rub off any regrowth. and treat it like a bit of history. The vine growing on it looks like the same sort you see on Pohutakawas and in the forests on the older trees. I havent checked it out yet but I'm pretty sure its a native.

    The old Totara post just in front of it proven to be more than I could handle for that day so its still, ( a week later) leaning in place waiting for me to finish digging it out.

    The 'Lavendar' bed continues around the tank. I had to make a start on leveling the path as the soil level dips quite dramatically as it gets towards the back of the tank, making everything look odd....so it was a matter of leveling the garden and edging, scooping out some more of the high spot of the path at the top of the steps and dumping it where I was to put the next lot of pavers in. SOunds nutty, but it has worked in levelling the path out.
    I have got to the point with this where I cant really do much more til I work out where the glasshouse is going to go. The edging will go right up to the side of the door for this.

    I have measured the width of the path all the way round so I could find out how close to the steps I can get the tool shed.This is waiting for its spot to be levelled out and will be jammed up against the fence between 2 posts.

    I am alittle concerned about my tank. Each time I water it or it rains, these pinprick holes start to appear which then grow into pock marks- looks like a teenager with acne from hell.
    I have looked at other peoples tanks and none of them look like this so I am going to have to call the tank company to come and deal with this.
     
  12. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    arg! (on the tank) sure hope it doesn't have to come out and be replaced, but better to have it down in writing and pictures before it goes past warranty.

    can you see the inside surface of the tank? does it have similar things happening?
     
  13. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    I havent dared have a look. I'm more worried about what is happening below ground level where I cant see whats going on.
    I maybe worrying over nothing, but all I can think is that these little pockets are a great place for plant roots to set up home and grow, whereas if the tank was smooth as it should be, any roots would just run along the surface.
    I am going to be making sure nothing that has invasive roots or trees are growing anywhere near it anyway....but still...

    The sales rep turned up when I was out and left a message to say he couldnt see any problem with it. I'm going to call the friend who recommended them (they bought their tank from the same place). He is also an engineer and might know whats what with these things. I dont know, its supposed to be 6cm thick and there are 1cm 'holes' in one side all over. I'll go check the inside now before it gets too dark to see.

    Does anybody know if its better to have the outlet to the house at the bottom to take advantage of the pressure all that water creates, or at the top with a pump to make sure any seals failing dont result in losing all the water out of the tank?
    I'm waffling on this and I'm starting to piss people off.(my fav plumber for one).

    Forgot to say I got my first lesson in beekeeping last week. The nucs arrived and I watched as these were put into their new homes.Very interesting, but I thought quite rough on the bees. I got to see bees rolled around as the frames were taken out of the box they came in and again as they were being put into the hives. Made me even more determined to learn more about the top bar systems.
    Got to check out the swarm that set itself up in another hive and to see just how much comb they make in a couple of weeks- amazing. They were really quiet nd didnt seem at all worried that we had just broken into their home. I now have a small piece of burr comb with a couple of cells of honey in it- smells wonderful.
     
  14. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    When the hive is large they will have something to protect. Be careful not to be mesmerized by the calm beginning!
     
  15. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    As I have a completely natural fear of whole hive loads of bees, I seriously doubt I will find them mesmerizing!!! I have this year to learn all I can before once again, leaping in the deep end next spring, when hopefully, I manage to attract a swarm in my to-be built hives.....I love honey and mead!!! So I need bees to make honey for me (and pollinate my garden).

    My friend turned up to look at the tank, declared he didnt know and afew days later brought around friend of his who ran the local concrete company before he retired.
    I can relax and stop worrying. The pock marks in the tank, as ugly as they are, are not a sign of anything seriously wrong. I was told that the reason I had never seen a tank look like this before is that they used to cover them with a splatter plaster which covered all these marks.
    Apparently, the tanks are actually stronger nowadays due to the fibre thingies they put in the mix which gives added strength to the concrete.
    As an added bonus, when I told him how I wanted to paint it with limewash paint, I learnt that the thing I need to buy is called hydrated lime. Years ago when I wanted to limewash the house, I had been trying to find slaked lime and nobody knew what I was talking about. Unfortuantely the house has since been painted with acrylic and I am in no hurry to sand it all off to limewash it now.
    This guy was an absolute gem and was able to tell me how to make the undercoat-add a large handful of ag salt to the first mix to go on the tank.
    The 'pigments' can be bought and are the same thing that is added to concrete to colour it.
    This should save me quite abit of dosh and the best thing about it is that once its made up, it lasts for years. Just need to scoop some out into another bucket and mix thoroughly with water before colouring and applying.
    I havent raced down the road to buy everything to do this yet. I am practising finishing those things already started.

    I have managed to get most of the area for the toolshed levelled, but need to move it out of the way as it is currently standing on one corner of where it will go.
    The last metre of hedge that was in the way of this has been cut down and dug out. I found two old fence wire in the ground that had to be hacksawed up in order to remove them. The wire they used back then looks like it is twice the thickness they use today.

    Almost got the retaining wall between the steps up to the garden and the'sundeck' put up. I need to buy one more length of the 'wrong' retaining wall- boy that didnt last very long. Mind you, its been used all over the place.... raising the level along the back fence line. so I can put a higher fence up that no more chooks can fly over to be munched,under the second dividing fence in the forage yards, along the wobbly fence to hold back soil from getting into the neighbours in order to sturdy up the fence.

    I almost missed out on harvesting the oats due to being away for a whole week. I arrived home to see a horde of wild birds busily harvesting it for me.
    Out came the sythe (which I have never used before), and I merrily hacked away til it was all cut off and put into a couple of piles.
    I spent the next afternoon, hand stripping it off the stalks into a couple of old chook feed bags.
    This and the mustard now spend its time between the porch at night and when its raining and the courtyard when the sun is out.
    No idea yet of what I have actually managed to produce, but I guess all will be revealled sometime soon.
    Someone did tell me I should be cutting up the oat straw into to tiny little pieces in order to make oat straw tea......tea made from stalks? I have never heard of such a thing are they mad?
     
  16. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    Put that oat straw into compost! There are better tasting teas I suspect.
     
  17. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    One of my hens decided to sit on clutch of eggs in the 'curing' compost bin. Seeing as hens have always just done their thing without human interference, I left her to it.
    This week, I noticed that she was out of the nest and had a wee one with her. For some reason, she abandoned the other 5 eggs even though it looks like at least one had been in the process of hatching- that egg had a little hole in it. I dont understand why she left the others but the two of them seem quite happy wandering round by themselves.
    It was abit of an experiment to see if she could pull it off unprotected from the neighbourhood cats.I thought she might have a problem with my cat but he seems to be more interested in catching rats and leaving them in the courtyard for everyone to admire...some partially eaten, which isnt a good look when visitors arrive unexpected.(I am going to have to invest in a rat trap!)

    'Red' doesnt seem to be in any hurry to get back to the rest of the flock yet, which could be bit of a problem.
    I had been letting the others out into the yard less and less so they start getting used to the idea that this is where they are supposed to be. I guess I will have to keep letting them out alittle while longer so they can get used to seeing her again and dont just attack her like they did with last years broody hen.

    I have slowly been sorting through things in the 'recycling' yard and have almost cleared it out of junk. Once the corro iron has been put on the new woodshed, I should be able to finish the fencing of this and it will finally be the forth quarter of the chooks forage yard.
    Thats the main target for January!!!

    The mustard seed experiment was abit of a disappointment. The seeds I sowed were quite alot bigger than what I harvested.Still quite hot though.
    Havent turned it into whole grain mustard yet.

    I finally got the retaining wall up between the parking area and the sloped bit of the garden. I used the tongue and groove sort for this seeing s it was going to holding alot of soil back. I had to ask my neighbour to help with getting the posts all on the same angle.Three hours of trying to not get it right and half an hour with help.grrr

    It was going to be a low wall but when I figured out how much soil I was going to have to find homes for from the courtyard and from levelling the 'floor' of the new woodshed, I decided to make it 4 boards high instead of the three, so the garden area behind this only has a slight slope to it.
    Just as well I did, I do alittle each morning before it gets too hot. Dig,level,put soil in wheel barrow, haul a couple/few metres and spade it over the retaining wall into the now new garden.Its quite shocking how fast the bit behind the wall has been filling up and how slowly the levelling bit has gone.
    Silly me, I did think this would get done real fast over the xmas break, but my family are onto me now, fishing and surfing is much more fun so that didnt work out.Not too much more to go.

    My new lemon tree decided that it would flower profusely and I have not taken its flowers off like I normally do with baby trees but......give it a good slosh of liquid fert (well diluted) on a regular basis.haha.why flush good fert away?

    I have finally decided to do what everyone has been telling me and have the water tank hooked up from the bottom to be run to the house and should have the dosh for the plumber at the end of the month.
    Hopefully, I will be able to get the laundry reconfigured too-made abit of a booboo there. I should have got the plumbing put on the other wall-oh well.
    A friend of mine cleared out alot of the ivy she had growing over her carport- truth be told, its the ivy holding the damn thing up, but anyway, nestled in at the bottom of all of this was 2 concrete laundry tubs, one a double which she wants to keep and a single tub that she didnt want....which I get to have.
    I am sick of plastic shit that keeps breaking so wont be using the so called superior modern sort of tub unit I have at the moment. Its a stainless tub but where the taps are, its all plastic and after only 7 years has alot of cracks in it.
    Good news is that I dont need a permit for this little job nor do I need one to take the old bathroom window out and replace it with a door. The original idea for the laundry would have made it very narrow and unfriendly. My new scheme, will make it more like a mud room and if there isnt any bracing next to the existing window, I might be able to squeeze in another small window next to the door. Hopefully this will let more light into the hallway in winter.
    While the hall is quite wide by modern standards-4 feet, the windows are very narrow and of course, the house is set to the road not the sun.
    When I got 'Sky', the poor technician had to use a torch to see what he was doing cos the living room is on the south side of the house and quite dark in mid winter, even at mid day.

    For some reason I always thought my house was built in the 1920's,but I recently found the title and this said its was built in 1939. I had been looking forward to having a century birthday party for it and am going to have to wait alittle longer.

    The 'Nectarine' tree is planted in the roadside garden is doing quite well but somehow is growing peaches, while the peach tree I keep cutting back, that is growing next to the house along the driveway, is now growing nectarines...go figure.

    Of the two chestnuts I planted so I could have some decent garden stakes, only one has continued to grow and this year has baby chestnuts on it.
    Not many but they are there. I'm still going to be coppicing this for stakes, I dont dare let it get too big, not so close to the fenceline.

    I got Mulberries this year, I didnt know they tasted like lollies- so sweet!!!( dont tell eco, but one of my baby feijoas had one fruit on it, in its first year in the ground. I did cut that one off)

    The big avocado tree has again got tiny fruit on it, so maybe this year I will be lucky. I havent bothered to water this as my neighbour on that side, mows his lawn every week and then hauls the sprinklers and soak hoses out to water everything sothe lawn doesnt die(?), meaning my trees get a good soaking as well.
    I will let them have some too, fairs fair. Hopefully, we will have a normal winter this year.

    I learnt the trick about oranges. Leave them on the tree and only take what you are going to eat then and there. They dont seem to drop off and are beautifully sweet and juicy. No more acid ulcers on the tongue.

    Quite afew of the black wattle trees growing in the front yard are needing to be cut down for firewood. I have been waiting patiently for someone to arrive to deal with them, but they havent shown up.
    So.... when I go up for my grandsons 1st birthday party, I am taking mum along with her chainsaw with me, so I can get some help starting this and I will be able to cut these down myself.
     
  18. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I'm so jealous. Mine still set flower but no fruit. :( I've learned the same trick with oranges too.

    Are your mulberries the red ones or white ones? The white ones are the sweetest.
     
  19. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Its supposed to be the black one, the berries sort of look abit like a Boysenberry and that sort of colour when they are ripe. I thought there was something wrong with them when they first started fruiting cos they started out white and just didnt look right at all.
    I dont understand. If your Feijoas are flowering but you arent getting fruit, that doesnt sound right. Could it be they need more mulch and more frequent watering? They are supposed to be quite shallow rooting trees.
    I recently found out that Feijoas are a south American native. All this time I thought they were Ozzies. Apparently, they are named after Joao da Silva Feijo.
     
  20. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    And I thought they were native to NZ! Go figure.
    They look healthy enough, but they only get the rain that falls out of the sky and now that you mention it they could so with more mulch….

    The purple / black mulberries do start out white. Not surprisingly so do the white ones!
     

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