Medicinal Plants for Livestock and other Animals

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by Michaelangelica, Dec 29, 2010.

  1. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    My mother's tried distilling manuka, but like active manuka honey, the 'active' bit varies wildly, even from plant to plant.
    Melaleuca alternifolia grows incredibly fast and processing produces a huge amount of mulching materials as a bonus.
    A bit simplistic, but a good mix of pasture species, particularly forbs and bitter plants like chicory, dealing with soil deficiencies, good rotation and culling genetically weak animals should keep any species pretty healthy.
    Someone's preobably discussed it, but garlic and live cider vinegar seem to be effective for all sorts of problems, especially internal parasites.
     
  2. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Q: What have you found in your research so far?
    A: In a continuing research in our natural products research group at Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), we have found that some extracts from one of the Euphobiacea plants growing in Tanzania are bioactive against pathogenic viruses, bacteria and fungi.
    Among which are viruses that cause serious and devastating diseases in poultry in Tanzania such as Newcastle Disease (ND), Fowl Pox (Pox), and Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD). These diseases pose the unceasing great set back to poultry industry in Tanzania. The extracts of the plant have also demonstrated its potential to prevent the growth of important bacteria and fungi that cause diseases in animals and humans.

    It is reported to be a major constraint to the development, survival and productivity of free range chickens which is the main source of animal derived protein in Tanzania.
    Vaccination has been considered the most and effective way of controlling it. However, due to keeping chickens of different age in the flock, lack of cold chain and transport facilities in rural areas as well as lack of trained and competent staff in remote areas, control of this disease using available vaccines in practically not feasible.

    https://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/index.php?l=37987
     
  3. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    The chooks would have to fight me for them
    Effect of shiitake [Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler] mushroom on laying performance, egg quality, fatty acid composition and cholesterol concentration of eggs in layer chickens.
    Hwang J.A., Hossain M.E., Yun D.H., Moon S.T., Kim G.M., Yang C.J.
    Journal of Medicinal Plant Research. 6 (1) (pp 146-153), 2012. Date of Publication: 09 Jan 2012.
    https://www.academicjournals.org/jmpr/PDF/pdf2012/9Jan/Hwang et al.pdf

    Publisher
    Academic Journals (PO Box 5170-00200 Nairobi, Victoria Island, Lagos 73023, Nigeria)

    AB Shiitake mushroom [Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler] has long been considered a delicacy as well as a medicinal mushroom in many Asian countries, as well as being dried and exported internationally. This study assessed the influence of shiitake mushroom on laying performance, egg quality, sensory properties, fatty acid composition and cholesterol concentration of eggs in laying hens. The dietary groups were control (basal diet), shiitake 0.25% (basal diet + 0.25% shiitake mushroom) and shiitake 0.5% (basal diet + 0.5% shiitake mushroom). Egg production was significantly increased (p0.05). Haugh unit was significantly increased (p>0.05) in both shiitake groups, but a thinner egg shell was observed in the shiitake 0.25% group and thicker egg albumen in the shiitake 0.5% group compared to the control group. Dietary addition of shiitake mushroom did not induce any effect (p>0.05) on sensory evaluation of eggs. Among the fatty acid composition of egg yolk, linoleic acid as well as total n-6 and polyunsaturated fatty acid contents were increased (p
     
  4. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Plant bioactives for ruminant health and productivity
    Plants have been used throughout history for their medicinal properties. This use has often focused on human health but plants have
    also been, and still are, applied in ethnoveterinary practice and animal health management.
    In recent times, the use of synthetic chemicals has become prevalent. Public awareness of the potential environmental and health risks
    associated with heavy chemical use has also increased. This has put pressure on regulatory bodies to reduce the use of chemicals in agriculture. The most striking example is the 2006 banning of antibiotics in animal feed by the European Union. Moves such as this have
    increased the drive to find alternatives to synthetic chemicals and research has again turned to the use of plant bioactives as a means of
    improving animal health.
    Current scientific evidence suggests there is significant potential to use plants to enhance animal health in general and that of ruminants (cattle, deer, sheep, etc.) in particular. Active areas of research for plant bioactives (particularly saponin and tannin containing
    plants) include reproductive efficiency, milk and meat quality improvement, foam production/bloat control and methane production.
    Nematode control is also a significant area of research and the evidence suggests a much broader range of phytochemicals may be effective. This review presents a https://eprints.jcu.edu.au/10183/1/Plant_bioactives_review.pdf

    also
    Dietary plant bioactives for poultry health and productivity.

    Br Poult Sci. 2010 Aug;51(4):461-87

    Authors: Wallace RJ, Oleszek W, Franz C, Hahn I, Baser KH, Mathe A, Teichmann K
    no pdf about
     
  5. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    just had a look at the review

    PUFA= polyunsaturated fatty acids
    very interesting to note that the pastures with the best PUFA were oak woodlands
    had trouble tracking down more of velasco et al (2004):sweat:
     
  6. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    interesting, would that be from acorns?

    Some stuff on the common weed marshmallow:-
     
  7. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Influence of Epimedium koreanum on the performance of laying hens, egg quality, and fat soluble vitamin and cholesterol contents in the yolk.
    Park K.-M., Jin Y.-H., Lee K.-T., Lee W.-I., Nam S.-W., Han Y.-K.
    Journal of Medicinal Plant Research. 4 (19) (pp 1971-1976), 2010. Date of Publication: 2010.
    [Journal: Article]
    Publisher
    Academic Journals (PO Box 5170-00200 Nairobi, Victoria Island, Lagos 73023, Nigeria)

    AB This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding Epimedium koreanum to laying hens on performance, as well as to determine its effects on interior and exterior egg quality along with fat soluble vitamin and cholesterol contents in the egg yolk. The experimental diets contained 0.0, 1.0, 5.0, or 10.0 g/kg E. koreanum. No significant changes were observed in the rate of egg production, with all treatments exceeding 95%. Linear increases in egg weight and mass (p < 0.01) were found with dietary E. koreanum supplementation. A dramatic increase (p = 0.05) was found in the number of extra large (60 to 70 g) size eggs with a concomitant reduction (p = 0.06) in the number of small (50 to 55 g) size eggs.
    Feed consumption and feed conversion were cubically (p < 0.01) affected by E. koreanum supplementation. Albumen weight and yolk color linearly increased (p < 0.01). The percentage of albumen linearly increased (p < 0.01) whereas yolk percentage decreased (p < 0.01). Vitamin E content in the egg yolk was quadratically (p = 0.02) affected by the treatments. In addition, cholesterol content of the egg yolks was quadratically (p < 0.01) increased. In conclusion, dietary inclusion of E. koreanum can have beneficial effects on the performance of laying hens in terms of improving egg weight, albumin weight, yolk color, and vitamin E content.
    However, these advantages may be more than offset by a significant increase in the cholesterol content of the egg yolk. 2010 Academic Journals.
     
  8. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Wonder what they fed the chooks in the control group?
     
  9. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    mmmm;>?/mM
     
  10. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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  11. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Chromolaena odorata in livestock nutrition
    https://www.academicjournals.org/jmpr/PDF/pdf2009/Decx/Aro et al.pdf
    CONCLUSION
    This review article tried to bring to the limelight some of
    the hidden potentials of this erstwhile obnoxious weed. Its
    successful use in layers’ diets without any reported cases
    of mortality in the literature cited under this review, its
    acceptance by the West African dwarf goats and its high
    preference score among other local weeds in Nigeria are
    all points in strong support of the possibility of re-writing
    the age long anecdote of this plant: dubbed “the
    obnoxious weed” ,
    [​IMG]
     
  12. chook-in-eire

    chook-in-eire Junior Member

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    Oregano (oil / tea / fresh leaves) popped up on various internet poultry forums some years ago as a feed additive to control coccidiosis in poultry, one of the prime 'chickhood' killers. I use it all the time. Garlic and apple cider vinegar are also said to be useful, and the white sap in dandelion leaves. The only case of coccidiosis I've had in my flocks in 8 years came with a bunch of chicks I adopted.

    Meanwhile the industry seems to have copped on to oregano too:
    https://www.worldpoultry.net/background/oregano-oil-to-control-coccidiosis-6916.html
    Indeed, doing a search with the word oregano on the site yields all sorts of interesting articles.

    Another remedy I have picked up from a German poultry forum is propolis tincture added to the drinking water to help cases of coryza in chickens (basically a 'chicken cold', NOT avian flu!; can get very nasty though and kill birds too). Seems to work if the illness isn't too advanced.

    Here is a link to a very useful book: Ethnoveterinary Medicine in Asia - Poultry
    https://www.nzdl.org/gsdlmod?e=d-00000-cdl---off-0cdl--00-0--0-10-0--0-0---0prompt-10--0direct-1----1stt-4-0-0l-20-11-en-50-00-3-21-about-R1straining+animals+and+simple+treatments-en-10-0-1---00-0-1-00-0--4----0-0-11-10-0utfZz-8-00&a=d&c=cdl&cl=CL2.5&d=HASH017f608f285bf0d9e2ee2ca0
    (The collection also contains similar volumes for ruminants and pigs.)
    Garlic, ginger, turmeric, fenugreek, basil, curry, chili a.o. get many mentions for common ailments.
     
  13. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Thanks chook-in-eire
    Good stuff!
    There are a lot of oregano varieties. The one commonly sold in Australian nurseries is crap(same flavour as grass).
    One day I saw a celebrity chef on TV complain that fresh oregano has no flavour and it was better to use dried!
    Little did he know he had been "sold a pup"
     
  14. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22829861?dopt=Abstract
    Plant Ethnoveterinary Practices in Two Pyrenean Territories of Catalonia (Iberian Peninsula) and in Two Areas of the Balearic Islands and Comparison with Ethnobotanical Uses in Human Medicine.
    Carrió E, Rigat M, Garnatje T, Mayans M, Parada M, Vallès J.
    Source
    Laboratori de Botànica, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Joan XXIII s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Abstract
    This paper presents the results of an ethnobotanical study centred in veterinarian uses in two Catalan Pyrenean regions (Alt Empordà -AE- and High River Ter Valley -AT-, Iberian peninsula) and two Balearic Islands areas (Formentera -FO- and northeastern Mallorca -MA-). In the areas studied, 97 plant species have been claimed to be useful for veterinary purposes. A total of 306 veterinary use reports have been gathered and analysed. The ten most reported plants are Tanacetum parthenium (24 use reports), Parietaria officinalis (15), Ranunculus parnassifolius (14), Meum athamanticum (13), Olea europaea (13), Quercus ilex (12), Ruta chalepensis (12), Sambucus nigra (10) and Thymus vulgaris (10). According to comprehensive reviews, a high number of novelties for plant ethnoveterinary are contributed: 34 species and one subspecies, 11 genera, and three families have not been reported in previous works in this field, and 21 species had only been mentioned once. Several ethnoveterinary uses are coincidental with those in human medicine. Although ethnoveterinary practices are less relevant than in the past in the territories considered, as in all industrialised countries, the knowledge on plant properties and applications is still rich and constitutes a large pool of evidence for phytotherapy, both in domestic animals and humans.
    PMID: 22829861 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] Free full text
     
  15. Stubby

    Stubby Junior Member

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    Hi everyone, awesome thread :).
    I will have do do some serious thread reading, but hope I can contribute with knowledge. I am a herbalist, trained in phytotherapy, and practice equine herbal medicine. But... herbs are herbs and their effects are amazing. I love treating animals as there are no egos getting into the way of the actions of the herbs. Trust me I know... I practiced on humans for a number of years and it was so frustrating... working with animals is rewarding :).
    I am subsrcibed to a number of good practitioner resources so will put the interesting stuff on this forum as well.

    A word on Honey:
    Honey is a great product to use on some, and I stress ... some... wounds, not all wounds. If you have a wound that needs cleaning, debriding, or is infected, then honey is a good wound dressing for a few days, but then needs to be discontinued once the wound is clean as it will continue to 'eat' into the new tissue, actually deepening the wound, causing pain and preventing healing. I have experienced it a number of time when using honey on human wounds (I am a reg. nurse as well), plus my human clients tell me that after a while the application of the honey actually makes the wound more painful. This is usually after a few days of treatment with honey and coincides with the wound being clean from infection, pus, or dead tissue. So be aware what the wound is doing when using honey.
     
  16. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    What do you think of, so called, medicinal honey; usually three times the price of 'normal' honey
    Seen this?
    wounds maggots
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi...nticated=false&deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=
     
  17. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    this weekend we have a permaculture teacher Caroline Wales coming to plant heaps of Medicinal plants for my livestock
    All welcome! we have an excellent sweedish intern who is learning lots of skills before woofing at Zatuna
    Welcome Stubby
     
  18. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Occupation:
    Farm manager/ educator
    Location:
    Hunter Valley New South Wales
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    warm temperate - some frost - changing every year
    I would love to be there Andrew. hope it goes great
     
  19. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    i would love u here PP!
     
  20. Stubby

    Stubby Junior Member

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    Re honey... yes we used the medicinal honey (Medihoney, based on Manuka honey).

    Andrew... sounds awesome. One of my goals is to have a medicinal herb garden for my horses to browse on as they need it.
     

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