Medicinal Plants for Livestock and other Animals

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by Michaelangelica, Dec 29, 2010.

  1. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Never did follow that up But NZ horses have a quite a reputation here.(Phar Lap was ours! not NZlands!(?)
    I know the winner was the 'health food shop' near Rosehill Racecourse that did a roaring trade in Chinese Ginsengs
     
  2. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    calcium is important to fast horses

    it amazes me that our best food growing land is tied up with racehorses
    \he who posseses the fastest horse tradionally had an element of freedom
    are you really shaun the sheep?
    all livestock love comfrey
     
  3. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Treatment of clinically diagnosed equine sarcoid with a mistletoe extract (Viscum album austriacus).
    Christen-Clottu O. Klocke P. Burger D. Straub R. Gerber V.
    Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 24(6):1483-9, 2010 Nov-Dec.

    Authors Full Name
    Christen-Clottu, O. Klocke, P. Burger, D. Straub, R. Gerber, V.

    AB BACKGROUND: Equine sarcoids (ES) are common, difficult to treat, and have high recurrence rates. Viscum album extracts (VAE) are used in human cancer treatment. HYPOTHESIS: That therapy with VAE (Iscador P) is effective in the treatment of ES. ANIMALS: Fifty-three horses (444 ES); 42 were treated with VAE or placebo as monotherapy; 11 were treated with VAE or placebo after selective excision of ES. METHODS: Prospective, randomised, blinded, clinical trial. Horses were randomly assigned to treatment (VAE; n=32) or control group (Placebo; n=21). One milliliter of VAE (Iscador P) in increasing concentrations from 0.1 to 20[em space]mg/mL or physiological NaCl solution was given SC 3 times a week over 105 days. Number, localization, and type of the ES were documented over 12 months. A subset of 163 clinically diagnosed equine sarcoid (CDES) lesions (95 VAE, 68 Placebo) was evaluated in detail, considering clinical findings and tumor volume. RESULTS: No undesired adverse effects were observed except for mild edema at the injection site in 5 of 32 horses (16%). Complete or partial regression was observed in 13 horses of the VAE group (41%) and in 3 of the control horses (14%; P
     
  4. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    im glad they still use horses for something usefull !
     
  5. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    It seems catnip may be a good all round insect repellent for live stock.
    Apparently it is also good fly repellent, something I didn't know.
    Usually it is just sold because cats like it.
     
  6. annette

    annette Junior Member

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    One of my chooks, shirley, developed some sort of fungal infection on her comb. there were little black spots. I tried to pick it off but it looked sore. I ended up dabbing it everyday with tea tree oil and it seems to have done the trick. No more spots. They seem to have fallen off somehow.
     
  7. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Good to know Ta
    many, perhaps most, essential oils are anti-fungal; Tea tree is said to be the strongest
     
  8. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Not very permaculture though, all that monocropping and industrial processing. You could extract the anti-fungal properties of tea tree by infusing in vegetable oil or vinegar, or even alcohol.
     
  9. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Yes I guess so; however in France lavender is grown in some pretty marginal, dry land,almost pure dolomite; the many little, community, stills that dot the country-side are fuelled by the waste from the distillation (lavender stems etc). It is usually organic , not because of ideology, but because lavender needs little help to grow in that area.
    Tea tree grows in swamps naturally, and could be an ideal tree for that impossible boggy spot.
    I agree a tea, decoction or alcoholic infusion could work almost as well as the pure oil. it would certainly be safer.
     
  10. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    My folks grow organic tea tree. They're not permies, but their main gear is a chainsaw, a four-wheeler, an old boiler niftily welded up as a distillation unit and lots of hacking with machetes. Industrial it is not!
    My mum sells hydrosol, the byproduct of distillation, to organic dairy farmers as a teat rinse to protect against mastitis.
    Got smelly nappies? Ulcers? Sore throat? MRSA? Tea tree kills off some pretty hard-core bacteria, and as a bonus you can drink it. Tastes like crap though.
     
  11. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Climate:
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    Leila, do you mind me asking where they sell the actual oil? And how they manage the manuka stands sustainably? (just curious). Manuka is a succession plant that grows on very badly disturbed soils. At least where I live there monocrop stands of natural manuka grow in places that have been very badly treated by humans (pre-humans I think it would only monocrop after fire). It is an amazing plant for sure, but I am not convinced that large scale use of it is sustainable, although it would be interesting to see how it could be managed as part of long term forest restoration. I have no problems with local, small scale production of essential oils, but I don't think using them as anti-bacterials on a daily basis is wise. There is some evidence that they will promote bacterial resistance.

    https://jac.oxfordjournals.org/content/59/1/125.full

     
  12. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    It's my understanding that too much comfrey is bad...? Am I wrong?
     
  13. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    too much of anything is bad
    the latin thing is very classy, watsit mean?


    ego credam permacoli
     
  14. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Unsaturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids found in many plants, including some Comfreys, are liver-toxic to some animals.
    I suspect that small amounts of the chemicals found in plants and foods( like honey) can be accommodated and many animals seem to have an uncanny ability to know what plants to eat and what to avoid.
     
  15. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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  16. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
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    That's true Ma, about the complexity, but nevertheless, essential oils are isolated extracts of plants chemicals, not the plants themselves (so are different to herbal medicine). 'Alot harder' doesn't mean not at all. I doubt they are anywhere near as bad as antibiotics, but I also think using them as magic bullets (which is how they get used mostly) is a really bad idea. If it took a mere 40 years to begin to wear out the usefulness of antibiotics, maybe it might take 140 or 240 for tea tree oil. It's still daft. We should be keeping essential oils for serious medical treatments not every small thing that goes wrong (and don't get me started on their use in cleaners and cosmetics).

    I stand by the point about permaculture though. It's hard to see commercially produced essential oils fitting well with permaculture's ethics. In terms of design, perhaps locally produced oils used for intractable problems makes sense, but it's still hard to see how mass harvesting plants from marginal land, or deliberately cultivating monocrops can be done using Pc and so using them as an input raises the same kinds of issues as many other problematic materials.
     
  17. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Literal translation:



    TooL translation:
     
  18. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    im assuming that is like patterson curse toxicity

    which is related to copper patterson curse is a bioaccumulator and toxicity usually occurs during a period when the animals ONLY food source is salvation jane :p
     
  19. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    pebble, I was going to post a link, but it felt a bit spammy... https://www.trueblueorganics.co.nz/index.pasp
    It's not manuka: its oil potency's inconsistent, it doesn't like wet feet, grows really slowly, etc, etc
    I know what you mean about the overusing antibacterial thing. Considering I only use tea tree for specific pathogens, I should be more careful about extilling the virtues of antibacterials. I'll send my mother a link to that article. As far as I was aware, resistance isn't an issue (yet), but I'm not surprised.
     
  20. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks Leila. It's only one study, but it did get me wondering why this hasn't been investigated more. I haven't looked further yet.

    Sorry for assuming it was manuka. I didn't know melaleuca was being cropped here, that's interesting.
     

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