Masonry Heaters, Stoves, Cooktops, Bakeovens

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by nchattaway, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    yes, that diagram is of a "black" oven. I am designing a "white" oven, where the fire exhaust does not enter the cooking area. My design will also have a cook top for pots and pans and a griddle/sizzle plate for direct cooking.
     
  2. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    ah, ok, thanks for the clarification. : )
     
  3. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Any time, sorry for any confusion caused. I will try and post some drawings when I get things worked out. Wife wants the cookstove to be part of her counters, so I have to come up with a proper way to incorporate the rocket and not end up higher than 36" from the floor for the whole thing. I know it can be done and done well since I've seen some photos of a couple of these in Denmark and one that is in the Netherlands. My biggest challenge will be the support structure since our floor will be approximately 2.5 feet from the soil under the house at the point where the stove will most likely sit. I will probably have to build a sub floor foundation to hold up the mass of the stove. Not a huge deal, just a big deal. LOL
     
  4. Bangyee

    Bangyee Junior Member

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    Thanks for this too. Sounds like something I would want to build one day. I would just try to solve the issue of summertime cooking without having to build two of these cooktop/oven systems i.e. how to redirect the hot gases before it enters the thermal mass path and wented outside (or use it for drying etc) in summer when the last thing I need is a hot bench...
    Any ideas examples?
     
  5. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    I am incorporating a second exhaust pipe that the hot air can be directed to via a "waste gate" sliding damper that will shut off the wintertime air flow direction and bypass the ductwork that is for heating the whole mass. It will still go to the single exit flue so I don't have to have two flue holes in the roof of our house.
     
  6. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    you may have better luck with a lever/hinge and damper than something sliding across, as with a slider you have to have a place for it to slide back into, instead with a damper it just rotates out a bit or closes back up. the hard part is making sure the lever is accessible and not in the way of other things.

    oh, but i just thought up a way to deal with a slider handle that would at least allow it to be folded up when it is either in or out (put a hinge in it : ) ). with a slot in the side of the oven the slider could be folded up into that recessed slot and it would not be in the way of anything. hmm... : )

    yes, a masonry stove would need a very extensive footing because you surely do not want it to settle if you can help it or if it does settle it needs to do so as an entire unit to prevent cracking. oy! : ) good luck. i'll be interested to hear how it goes.
     
  7. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Good ideas there songbird, thank you.

    I think it will mostly depend on how I route the air flow for the oven (thinking it should be the first thing the hot air heats) and the cook top(s). One of these I have drawings of uses two separate rockets so the oven doesn't have to be heated if just using the cook top. While this is a really good idea, it may not be the best solution for our particular setup. I just have to get my drawings and thinking right to know for sure. I do know I don't want two flue holes in the roof. I also know the wife doesn't want a huge structure blocking her views of the timber frame, she wants an open floor plan so the house will feel larger than the 1,050 sq. ft. I am designing.

    The foundation will be one of the only things I use concrete for. We have an already poured footing (put in place for a double wide Mobile Home by the previous owner) and the house will sit on piers attached to that footing. The footing is poured on a slope so I will have to do some forming and rebar to get everything to sit level, this actually means the heater foundation will be just a little more work since I can incorporate it at the same time I am doing the support system for the floor and rim joists.
     
  8. Donkey32

    Donkey32 Junior Member

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    If you're building the stove from ground level up (foundation and all), you should have PLENTY of room to achieve your height restrictions. Rocket J can be sunk down so that the feed opening is level with or slightly higher than the floor.

    To the oven, it does NOT actually need to have a physical pass through to the chimney, it can be treated as a bell. I know of an oven that sets on top of the barrel in a classic rocket stove setup. There is a valve between the top of the barrel and the bottom of the oven that connects the two volumes. The exhaust path still exits down the barrel, through the bench and on to the chimney; with the valve open it detours through the oven first, heating it very effectively. His valve was made by tacking a flat metal sheet to an old hand scythe, I think he may have used a nail as his pivot point. The opening to the oven wasnt more than 5 inches (12.7cm) in diameter.
    In this way, you can have TOTAL control over how much heat goes to the oven or close it entirely, providing more heat to a cook top, etc.

    Sliding dampers (also known as guillotine dampers) tend to provide a better seal than gate or pivot dampers. This is VERY important when designing bypasses in stoves. I know of one stove where the guy used an old pivot damper as his bypass; with it open, exhaust would flow directly to a very tall chimney, in the closed position exhaust would flow down into a bench, travel a distance, turn 180 and travel back to the chimney. The difficulty was, draft in that chimney was so great, the damper didn't work. As soon your hand came off the damper, it would swing open just enough so that heat never got down into the bench. When the swing damper was locked in place (vice-grip) there was still so much flow around the thing that the bench didn't operate properly. The solution was to dig out the swing damper and replace with a slider.
    Yes, the handles can be in the way, just gotta be clever about placement.
     
  9. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Thank you Donkey32, great advice and I will definitely make use of it.
     

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