marrying geodesic with thermal mass solar passive structure?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by heuristics, Jun 16, 2006.

  1. dewbee

    dewbee Junior Member

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    rendering

    i still think hessian dipped in cement is the go.... what is there to be said for surface tension and geodesic domes???
     
  2. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Heuristics,

    Have you considered building your home somewhat into the hillside? This would provide your view, solar gain, and the benefits of earth sheltering for both summer cooling and winter warmth. It would not have to be "underground" (more costly), but merely take advantage of the natural temperature of the earth below grade, which is the ultimate form of thermal mass! There are ways to earth-berm your home that are cost effective. You could even curve the front as you envisioned with the dome idea. Thoughts?

    9anda1f
     
  3. heuristics

    heuristics Junior Member

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    geodesic

    Hiya 9anda1f (now THAT'S a moniker!!!)

    Re building INTO the earth – have I given it any thought? Well actually, interstingly that you should ask, as this post has progressed over the weeks, this option as become more appealing. .........
    The geodesic thingie would be grand jutting out right on the edge of an existing level platform, but it would be very “dogs ballsie” or should I say “Rob Windt-ie” , like very OUT THERE.
    But I could move back about 20 or so metres and tuck the building near an embankment.. The slope of the land means a bit of excavation would give me a drop of about 2ms or 2.5 metres.
    As I wander around evaluating house sites on my land, this one does appeal to me.
    If I did this, I would be tucked down below the embankment. The nasty August winter winds come howling from the south-west and, with a shed built on the top level, and the straw-bale house on the lower level, I should be protected from the winds – and that nasty end-of-day summer sun which sets in the “south” west and never seems to quit.. it burns on and on from that direction to past 8pm some nights. The below embankment option would mean I'd have shade a lot earlier in a summer evening, but continue to enjoy that wonderful full-on north-west winter sun..
    So, this post has been good to shape my thinking.. cause as I wander around I now “see” some sort of rounded room to catch the views and morning winter sun, with a longer box facing north, tucked up, as you say, below the embankment (not too close, because of drainage).
    Of course the big “downside” to this option is the excavation cost of taking a bite back into the hillside, but – it'd be a great location and give me a level building site for a slab.

    I could put a pergola with deciduous vines where I was thinking of the geodesic... And of a summer's afternoon the house and top-level shed should cast shadows onto the pergola, so it'd be cool and have great views.

    Now... imagine... a glass of vino, as I sit back with that tired-muscle feeling after a weekend's worth of virtuous permie activities....

    sigh.
     
  4. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    BD, natural gas is not the panaceae that people like to think it is. A big part of the concept that it is a good thing is in the name "natural gas". The mining process to get natural gas involves lots of energy, and also has biproducts, including salt water in Montana, etc.

    The US is interested in obtaining natural gas from other parts of the globe, and natural gas fueled generators offer investors rapid payback and return on investment (especially when subsidized) but no community in its right mind (not blinded by the possibility of lucrative municipal revenue sources other than the voters themselves) would allow a natural gas barge to use its port to unload. The danger of an explosion or catastrophic incident from LNG (liquid natural gas) is so high that no insurance company will insure such an activity.

    Anyway, the idea behind the Kecheloven stove is that the burning of fuel is absorbed in the mass of the stove, as you know. However, the extremely high temperatires of such burns makes for very clean burnng, with little smoke or particulate. Wood, being a renewable source of fuel, and being carbon neutral, is a much more appropriate technology than natural gas, and this stype of stove is much cleaner than other wooden stoves (like my grimy little cook stove, for example).
     
  5. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Heuristics,

    Have you seen this? [​IMG]

    Geodesic underground dome! Uses an insulating "umbrella" for temperature retention and "dryness" of the soil surrounding the home. Another way to have the geodesic dome and earth sheltering! :D

    Passive Annual Heat Storage (https://www.rmrc.org/pahs/index.htm) for more info and e-book.

    9anda1f[/img]
     
  6. Honeychrome

    Honeychrome Junior Member

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  7. domecompany

    domecompany New Member

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    marrying geodesic with thermal mass solar passive structure

    Hi Heuristics
    I guess you visited the dome at the eco show when I was doing a walkabout of the other displays. I was there 95% of the time for 3 days.
    If anyone wants to rave about geodesic domes, I've been building them for 30 years and never tire of answering questions.
    https://www.domecompany.com.au
     

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