making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by ppp, Aug 4, 2008.

  1. ppp

    ppp Junior Member

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    Having spent a little while in our current garden, we are enjoying our recent predicament of having too many of a couple of plants from their seeds and reproduction for our available space(tumeric, cardamon, galangal, pigon pea, mizuna, paw-paw from seed)

    Now, I am thinking it might be nice to have an embarassment of riches in the form of too many rosmary plants.. the plan being firstly we never seem to have enough and secondly, I'd like to have too many for their flowers (for the bees!)

    Does anyone have any advice on making cuttings? I have made a half-hearted attempt in the past, perhaps I am not patient enough?? i have some of that cutting powder and should probably be able to water them every day.
    How long is it likely to take to produce decently sized plants?

    The plan would be to replace a little strip of lawn along my driveway with mass planted rosmary..
     
  2. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    Early summer to fall:
    Cut 2.5-3" (3cm) long tip from healthy plant, trim off just below a leaf node, remove all foliage on the bottom half of the cutting, dip in rooting hormone*, and insert in free-draining medium. Cover with opaque plastic to contain humidity, but air out often to prevent rot. Spraying with a fungicide can help. It takes 1 to 2 months to root. Keep from freezing.

    Late fall to late winter:
    Take similar cuttings after flowering (new flushes of growth are best). Keep them free of frost to prevent premature growth. If growth does occur, you'd best trim back the new growth to just above the new growth. This prevents rot and aphid attacks.

    Mound layering can be an easy way if you don't have much time or don't like to fuss: In spring, use a well-rooted plant that is currently in the ground (this method is great for old, leggy herbs that are past their prime).

    Mix peat and sand 50/50 and mound it around and sift it over the plant so you have a mound of the mix that has buried the stems and lower branches of the plant. All you really want showing is the top half of the plant. The stems buried in the mix will form roots in the mound (Be sure to replace any mix that gets washed away by watering or rain.) By late summer, enough roots should have formed to provide a goodly number of new plants, just detach them from the main stem and plant immediately. Dig up and discard the mother plant.
    This method is also useful for other shrubs, like blueberries and some others that aren't coming to mind.

    * If you don't like those toxic commercial root powders, you can soak chopped up willow stems in water, and water the starts with that.

    Sue
     
  3. ppp

    ppp Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    thanks for that..

    all this talk of frost and ice! None of that here... :) I'm guessing that any time of the season will be fine for me then? (subtropical climate)
    ok, well I might try both of your methods.. I'll deep bury a plant I have (currently in a pot), plus take cuttings and try sticking them into a pot.
    Can I assume that being a seppo your inches measurement are more correct than your centimeters?? (ie 3 inches is 7.5cm??)

    :)
    thanks Sue.
     
  4. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    Rosemary is incredibly easy to propogate.

    Take a cutting at any time of year, stick it in a jar of water on the kitchen window sill, wait. Eventually roots will grow and you can pot it up. I've not counted how long, but I would guess similar to Sue's time frame of a month or so.

    I often have 3 or four cuttings in a jar at one time. You don't need rooting hormone, I don't even bother with willow water for rosemary because it roots so well.

    That's all for upright rosemary but I think the prostrate one would be the same.

    Can't have too many rosemary plants :D
     
  5. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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  6. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    "Can I assume that being a seppo your inches measurement are more correct than your centimeters?? (ie 3 inches is 7.5cm??)"

    OH, POOP!
    :shock: :prayer: :banghead:

    Sue (caught again!)
     
  7. ppp

    ppp Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    :) just checking.. hey one day we'll convince you that metric units are the only sensible option, until then, would you excuse my occasional ribbing?

    :)
     
  8. barely run

    barely run Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    Have just recently read about willow water as a rooting agent and now here it is again. Previously have always used honey with great sucess. I have plenty of willows here so will try it for my spring propergating. did a heap of lavender, very similar to rosemary in autum small slips dipped in honey and close together in a tray. had about 70% sucess and as soon as it's a bit warmer
    (-10 Tuesday morning) I'll pot them on.
    Cathy
     
  9. barely run

    barely run Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    Have been thinking about the willow water. Any thoughts on using it to water seeds to encourage germination?
    cathy
     
  10. Paul Cereghino

    Paul Cereghino Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    The acids in willow that make it produce roots so rapidly are absent in other plants that don't produce roots rapidly. Willow also has the advantage of root primordia that formed when shoots grow (little clumps of undifferentiated cells ready to become roots just below the bark). Plants without high levels of the rooting hormones and without primordia benefit from willow tea and the time to form primordia. Some species are limited by things other than rooting hormones, and willow tea or rooting hormones won't affect rooting (a huge bunch of native shrubs show no response to rooting hormone, but DO like being soaked.. its the tea not the willow). My school thesis is about rooting cuttings, is on-line and has a pretty good literature review on the topic. There is a bunch of my PDF collection on-line from that workshop as well.

    Seeds have different kinds of barriers to break... demanding things like scarification (simulating going through the crop of a bird), stratification (chemicals that break down over time in cold moist temperatures), temperature triggers... even smoke chemicals will trigger germination of seeds that wait for wildfires... haven't heard anything about a seed response from growth hormones... but some folks will soak seeds prior to planting (priming) to accelerate germination.
     
  11. barely run

    barely run Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    WOW....starting reading the thesis but I'll need a bit of peace and quiet to take it all in. TV going in the background at present, phone, people etc.
    Cheers
    Cathy
     
  12. Raymondo

    Raymondo Junior Member

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    Re: making cuttings for acheiving over-production?

    I work in a local nusery where we propagate our stock either from cutting or seed. For the cuttings we always use rooting hormone, different strengths for different plants. I also do some propagating from home. I never use hormone, or even honey. I just stick them in a pot, keep it in the shade, and water regularly. I don't have the succcess rate we do at work but it's good enough for my purposes. I grow a number of grevilleas this way, as well as various food plants.
     

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