Low income loans- Microfinace - Microenterprise

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Michaelangelica, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    This might interest some

    https://www.nab.com.au/wps/wcm/connect/n ... ut_Us/4/3/

    Has anyone any first-hand experience of these "products" from NAB?
     
  2. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Low income loans- Microfinace - Microenterprise

    More at
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009 ... 475186.htm

    We need asimilar sheme her or something Like Charlie's "Prince's Trust"

    If you have spare $30 US
    and would like to loan it to someone look here
    https://www.kiva.org/

    You can choose plant people & enterprises for it to go to

    https://www.forbes.com/2008/06/03/kiva-m ... nkiva.html

    One day a permaculture Bank or Credit Union :glasses5: :love1:
     
  3. Tim Auld

    Tim Auld Junior Member

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    Re: Low income loans- Microfinace - Microenterprise

    That kiva.org, what a great idea! Awesome alternative to the destructiveness of the IMF and its crazy idea of development!
     
  4. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Low income loans- Microfinace - Microenterprise

    Yes isn't it.?!
    So if you become really poor in the future you can ask for you money back all you are doing is giving an interest free loan of $30.
    I would like to see Kiva charge 1% interest to the people it loans to. This is more realistic, as no one gives interest free loans in the real world. (?!) That 1% might go to funding more loans or covering Kiva's administration costs, which must be huge.
    It is interesting, that most microfinacing loans go to women, and they spend it on educating their kids and growing their business. Men drink it. (not all).


    Another idea-not yet a reality- green finance
    More here
    https://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=8477
     
  5. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    You don't even have to donate to Kiva you just LOAN them $30 and you can get it back anytime
    How easy is that for an opportunity to make a real difference, in a practical way, and to alleviate poverty and giving people dignity and control over their lives?
    This is anewsletter i just received from them
    Hi Kiva Friend,

    We are deeply saddened by the devastating earthquake in Haiti, and we're just beginning to hear news from our Field Partner in Haiti, Esperanza. This month's newsletter contains information on Esperanza, the Haitian entrepreneurs supported by Kiva lenders and a link to organizations specializing in disaster relief in Haiti.

    Also featured this month are new partners in Latin America, a chance for Kiva to win $1 million, the results of our video contest and more.


    Earthquake in Haiti: Update from Field Partner Esperanza

    A devastating earthquake has struck Haiti, and many Kiva lenders have been asking how the entrepreneurs in Haiti are fairing. For an update from our Field Partner in Haiti, Esperanza
    Earthquake in Haiti: Update on Kiva Field Partner Esperanza
    Jan 13, 2010
    As you may have seen in the news, a terrible earthquake struck Haiti yesterday afternoon. The earthquake, 7.0 in magnitude, struck about 10 miles outside Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince. The devastation has been enormous, with many buildings destroyed and thousands of people presumed dead. This is the worst earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years.

    Kiva currently supports borrowers in Haiti through our field partner, Esperanza International. Esperanza is based in the Dominican Republic, but has an office and provides loans in Haiti. About 1/3 of the loans Esperanza posts to Kiva are for borrowers in Haiti. In addition, a large percentage of the loans posted from the Dominican Republic are of Haitian migrants who still have family in Haiti. Esperanza has told us that as of now, Esperanza staff are safe though they have several employees with family in Port-au-Prince who have not been able to contact their families and are very concerned. Esperanza’s clients are located in the North, while the earthquake struck the capital in the south. Most of their clients live close to their offices in the north. However, many of them have businesses that require them to travel to and from Port-au-Prince to buy merchandise to sell in the main markets. Their businesses may have been affected and it is possible that some of them may have been in Port-au-Prince at the time and been injured.

    It is impossible for Esperanza to give us any exact figures at this time as information is only slowly trickling out of Haiti. As Kiva learns more about the effect of the earthquake on Esperanza and their Kiva borrowers we will update lenders.
     

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