Living Water Filter

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by scottjunner, Apr 13, 2009.

  1. scottjunner

    scottjunner Junior Member

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    I was running over the idea of the contents of my drinking water and my limited knowledge of how to filter water and I had an idea. What if I could build a water filter that was something like a reed bed system to put the tap water through ( it's loaded with chlorine and I think now Flouride (yippee!)) and then draw off that for drinking and cooking?

    Could people share with me any knowledge they have about how I might achieve this with some simple materials and what results I can expect from trying such a misadventure.

    My guess is that sunlight is required. But I don't know if I can get away with just a little or if I need alot. I also figure a pump will be involved because I would think circulation is nessesary.

    What plants can I use? What other materials would be good (sand, brick, bluestone?)?

    And what materials would be good to steer clear of for the construction of tanks or pipes or whatever?

    Looking forward to hearing your responses.

    Scotty.
     
  2. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Re: Living Water Filter

    Scott,

    A couple of issues. If you have access to treated drinking water then it may be best to use it. If you want to get off tap water then rainwater tanks are a good stop gap. You can buy commercial 'next to the tap' filters that will amend tap water. If you really want natural then get into aquaponics and drink that stuff.

    What you are asking is if there is a natural filter regime that will suit your needs. Unless you are on bore/well/dam/river water you may be wasting an already caught resource and trying to filter it. This is admirable and probably fairly wasteful.

    I have spent 4/5ths of my time lapping the sun on non-commercial water. Generally it has been potable. I think what you should be looking at is what happens to the water once we turn a tap off and that is a near science in itself. Drought strategies and water shortages in Southern Australia have come up with a range of tested technologies. It is this water that shouldnt be wasted. Interestingly, if we were to ban the use of 'stormwater drains' would we cure Australia's water storage in the 'burbs?

    cheers,
     
  3. drrdave27

    drrdave27 Junior Member

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    Re: Living Water Filter

    It sounds like a good idea to me if you cant do rainwater collection. The main question in my head is, how would you feed the plants? There would need to be some sort of nutirent, i couldnt imagine them surviving in tap water for too long. Then this would be in your drinking supply. Maybey there's a way around it, dunno. Peaz.
     
  4. Jana

    Jana Junior Member

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    Re: Living Water Filter

    There is a method of removing fluoride from municipal water using calcium chloride, running an electric current through the water to combine the fluoride with the calcium and then filtering it through a filter of diatomaceous earth mixed with pumice.


    Water that moves in a spiral path has an electric charge, while water that travels in straight paths has no electrical charge. The spiral, vortical motion mentioned earlier, which eventually led Viktor Schauberger to the formation of his theories concerning 'implosion', creates the conditions, where the germination of harmful bacteria is inhibited and the water remains disease-free. Schauberger concluded water was alive and went through various life, death and transformation cycles. Viktor Schauberger's theories afford new insights into the naturally correct or naturalesque management of water. This encompasses its proper handling, storage, and conduction by means that promote its self-purification, the retention and enhancement of its natural energies and health. As a natural organism, water is formed and functions according to Nature's laws and geometry, the latter exhibiting none of the elements of the straight line, circle and point, the basis of modern mechanical and technological artifacts. Reflecting Nature's principal constant, namely that of continuous change and transformation, the vortex epitomizes this form of open, fluid and flexible motion.

    Although the chlorination of drinking and household water-supplies ostensibly removes the threat of water-borne diseases, it does so, however, to the detriment of the consumer. In its function of water sterilizer or disinfectant, chlorine eradicates all types of bacteria, beneficial and harmful alike. More importantly, however, it also disinfects the blood (about 80% water) or sap (ditto) and in doing so kills off or seriously weakens many of the immunity-enhancing micro-organisms resident in the body of those organisms constantly forced to consume it. This eventually impairs their immune systems to such a degree that they are no longer able to eject viruses, germs and cancer cells, to which the respective host-bodies ultimately falls victim.
    https://www.frank.germano.com/viktorschauberger.htm

    The one book Viktor Schauberger wrote was "Our Senseless Toil" (1933)

    Olof Alexandersson, a Swedish engineer and anthroposophist, wrote the first popular introduction to the radical ideas of Viktor Schauberger, entitled Living Water as well as Hidden Nature, which is an overview of Viktor’s work.
     
  5. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Living Water Filter

    See the thread "Another kind of 'stirrer' "

    My brief membership at the Australian Rose Club showed me that members would not put chlorinated water on their prize roses. Although they drank it themselves.

    One wonders what it does with all the soil 'wee beasties" too. These we depend on for soil fertility and plant growth.
     

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