Living bridges

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Wolf_rt, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. Wolf_rt

    Wolf_rt Junior Member

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  2. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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  3. adiantum

    adiantum Junior Member

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    The beauty and sublimity of this practice reveals some important lessons for permaculturists everywhere:
    1.) Real sustainability must be multi-generational. So much of permaculture seems to be about pioneer homesteading....system startup.....establishing life, and livelihoods from scratch on degraded landscapes. Where is the time to observe and design carefully when one has a house to build and gardens to set up? So there has to be a way to pass our work and our sites on to succeeding generations ensuring that the best of our work and our designs will carry forward, and be built upon. Western cultures have been addicted for too many generations to mobility, affluence, and freedom of choice....it seems insane to us to actually expect our children to follow in our footsteps.....while this is in fact the norm of most of the remnant sustainable cultures the world around.
    2.)The other connected issue is the problem of private property. I doubt that the bridges depicted exist solely on one private landholding. But again, in a sustainable culture, private property is a looser concept (if it exists at all) than our "civilized" mainstream notion. Large areas of land, including most crucial sources of ecosystem services (like springs and watercourses) are very likely held in common, with agreed upon principles guiding their use. What we have now in the modern world is a lot of land that is either unused or abused, and a lot of landless people without a subsistence except to participate (or fail to!) in the cash economy.
     
  4. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Very valuable observations adiantum - I think it is worth it's own thread and not be hidden here under living bridges though I do see the relevance. Thanks for bringing this up.
     
  5. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Hmmm, would be interesting to graft branches and trees together to make large walk ways in the canopy area thus making it easier to harvest fruit in the upper levels without use of cherrypickers and so on.
     

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