Lamb vaccinations & sheep management

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by shimmergirl, Feb 16, 2011.

  1. shimmergirl

    shimmergirl Junior Member

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    I am trying to find out what I should do re vaccinations and immunisation for lambs. I asked my local vet and they had no idea. Where do I buy these from and what age do they get given them?

    And any other advise regarding breeding and raising my small flock would be helpful.

    Thank you.
     
  2. milifestyle

    milifestyle New Member

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  3. shimmergirl

    shimmergirl Junior Member

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    No not much help at all :) sorry... although I did pick up this poster made reference on losing lambs, which may be related to my specific question.

    What I do know is that lambs are or should be vaccinated with something but I don't know what this is, which prevents a disease which I think is called Stumpy Leg, which is caused by a protein build up from feeding grain, it causes them to become bloated and die. But this is all I know about it. I am seeking more information in relation to these vaccinations and where I get these from.

    The worming and shearing are done yearly by my shearer at the same time.
     
  4. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    Are you growing your lambs organically?

    It seems to me a solution for a problem where the sheep are reacting to being fed grain would be to stop feeding them grain. A healthy lifestyle with a well-rounded diet will go a long way to solving all sorts of problems
     
  5. shimmergirl

    shimmergirl Junior Member

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    Yes I am :) At the moment I only grow enough to supply my family and my extended family, but I would like to eventually grow enough to supply locally.

    Feeding excessive grain is definately a problem for the unvaccinated lambs. But feeding grain has its advantages.

    My sheep run freely and graze all day on pasture, but at night I confine them to a smaller yard to keep them safe, feeding them grain makes them friendly and helps me keep their routine.
     
  6. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    I would recommend Pat Coleby and her book Natural Sheep Care, a wonderful source of information!!!!
     
  7. shimmergirl

    shimmergirl Junior Member

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    Thank you Tegs, I will go see if I can find it.. Thanks for that.
     
  8. geoff

    geoff Junior Member

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    Hi Shimmergirl,

    When I've helped with lamb marking in the past the lambs all get a shot of vaccine and a dose of drench at marking time. This marking is sometime around 2 months after birth (for some!) and then they get another dose of vaccine 4 - 6 weeks later at weaning time. The vaccines can cover a number of different afflictions (2 or 3 in 1 up to 6 in one, maybe even more these days). The following agfact has more information on vaccination programs, though it is a bit old (2005):

    https://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/179860/sheep-vaccination-programs.pdf

    Your local rural supplies store will have the vaccines, drenches and other gear you need and can probably offer some better, locally applicable advice.
     
  9. shimmergirl

    shimmergirl Junior Member

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    6 in 1 is what I have heard. Thanks for this. I will have a look at that website.

    No my local produces must be to city to stock them or know about them :) My vet was no help either. I am going to go to see a vet further out today so maybe he will know and sell them.
     
  10. geoff

    geoff Junior Member

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    They've taken the "rural" out of rural supplies, lol!
     
  11. shimmergirl

    shimmergirl Junior Member

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    lol yes they have :)
     
  12. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Hi shimmergirl - have moved you over to the animal section in the hope that it gets you more answers.
     
  13. hardworkinghippy

    hardworkinghippy Junior Member

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    If lambs get colostrum from their ewe (or another ewe ideally in the same flock) they grow up fine and healthy and immune from many diseases without much in the way of veterinary help. You can inject for all sorts of things as a prevention, I suppose it depends on your area and what kind of diseases and conditions are prevalent.

    We worm them after they've been on grass for a few weeks, keep them in for a couple of days until the worms have worked their way through the digestive system and possibly worm them again at six months depending on our pasture growth and if we've been able to adhere to the rotation programme. That's it.
     
  14. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    While were on the topic of sheep management I would like to pose a question (if no-one minds me hijacking the thread for a minute). I have a sheep with what I think is "buffle head" or "big head syndrome". All I can find out about it is that it is most likely caused by a weed in our pasture (crofton weed, i think) but I can't find any information on how to treat the sheep. All the information I have come across basically says that some animals die others don't ... not very helpfull! I could be wrong but it seems to have something to do with excess copper and locking up calcium within the sheep I have made sure there is extra dolamite out as a free choice mineral lick but I don't know if this will help or what else I can do.
    Any advise would be greatly appreciated!!!
     
  15. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    P.S. Just like your experience Shimmergirl, my vet must be far to city as she is unable to help me at all :(
     
  16. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    My ewe is looking somewhat better today and eating well. FYI I gave her cod liver oil and olive leaf extract in her feed last night, not sure if it was the cause of the improvement but can't have hurt!?!?!?!
     
  17. Terra

    Terra Moderator

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    Worming sheep , we only worm once a year , best time is when its hot and dry (Worm Eggs struggle to survive) , easy here as we have long dry summers so a drench through january is ideal . More difficult if you have constant green feed , you will need more paddocks to spell from grazing .
    Vaccinations will protect from a whole host of problems depending on your location , diet is critical for health and carcase and wool quality.
     
  18. DONBEAR

    DONBEAR New Member

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    Hope this helps.
    The vaccines can be 5 in 1, 6 in 1 and 7 in 1. Basically the cover disease in sheep that can be fatal, such as tetanus, blacks disease and pulpy kidney. Generally the first vaccine is done at marking time 6-8 weeks of age then a booster is given 4 weeks later, then yearly to maintain resistance.
    You can buy them from any Ag supplier, not sur what the smallest package is, maybe ten doses. The injection is given under the skin, not into the muscle.
    Then consider drenching to complete the job.
     
  19. DONBEAR

    DONBEAR New Member

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    G'day Tegs,
    Just check the gums, skin, and roll back the eyelids of your sheep. If they appear white, your sheep may have barbers pole worm. If so they need immediate attention. One of the signs is "bottle jaw", swelling under the jaw which then spreads to the whole head. You will not see any sign of the worm in the dung.
    Drench with a multi-combination drench to save the sheep. It can be fatal.
     
  20. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    Thanks Donbear, The "big head" symptoms appeared after we cleared up a case of worms, the ewe was anaemic but no longer is. It definitely isn't bottle jaw, I have seen that before. In this case the swelling starts on the top of the face mostly around the nostrils and forehead... She seems to be getting better the extra minerals + cod liver oil and olive leaf extract must be doing some good. Fingers crossed!

    I tend to think that vaccination is unnessasary, I like to take the organic approach where ever possible. Obviously if an animals life is on the line and there is a chemical treatment that will save them and no organic alternative then I am all for it.
     

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