kungevoi to raise soil ph.

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by butchasteve, Apr 21, 2010.

  1. butchasteve

    butchasteve Junior Member

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    So it is well known the poisonous alkalinity of the kungevoi plant.

    would the mulching or composting of kungevoi help to raise the ph of acidic soils, or would it just poison the soil?
     
  2. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    No i dont think it would have much effect on pH nor would it poison the soil.
    Cunjevoi (Alocasia sp. -an Aroid) is not good to eat , although there are strains that have been isolated in the Pacific Is. that are used as a minor or famine food.
    It can be used as a source of starch but the main problem with it is the Calcium oxalate crystals found throughout the plant.
    Calcium oxalate, although toxic is mainly a physical irritant to sensetive skin and mucous membranes.
    Taro has the same stuff but cultivars have been selected since prehistory (it's one of the oldest cultivated crops) to be relatively free of it.
    There is also an alkaloid (what I think you may be refering to) in the plant , enough to make the plant a dangerous to eat , but not enough to change soil pH.

    Alkaloids are compounds that are so named because they are generally basic.
    Nicotine, cafeine, strichnine are some examples.
    They're usually named after the genus of plant that they were first isolated from.
    Nicotiana sp. ; Coffea arabica ; Strychnos nux-vomica respectively.

    If Cunjevoi was applied to the soil surface or tilled in not too deep, it would all break down into benign compounds, including the Ca oxalate and alkaloids.

    If you wanted to change soil pH quickly, ground limestone works well.
    But keeping soil OM up will buffer against drastic changes after that.

    A bit of drawn out answer ... when maybe a simple 'no' may have been more succinct. :)
     
  3. butchasteve

    butchasteve Junior Member

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    i wouldn't have been satisfied with no. thanks for the long winded version..

    i suspected the alkaloids would break down, good to hear the reasons why tho..

    I now see i actually lack sulphur anyway (alkaline soil) so the point of the thread is probably moot. although still a question answered
     

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