Keeping the Capsicums going - how long can you keep some plants going

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by d_donahoo, Mar 11, 2003.

  1. d_donahoo

    d_donahoo Junior Member

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    we have a couple of very prolific eggplant and capsicum plants this year. (gotta love non-hybrid open pollinated seeds)...

    they are looking #### good and i'm wondering how long we can keep them going?

    we are in Central Vic. and it is going to get cold.

    would erected plastic green houses do the job? i was also thinking of our 20 litre vinegar containers filled with water and painted black as a heat sink close by.

    or...should i let them go - start enjoying broccolli and save the seeds for next year?

    dan
     
  2. Jeff Nugent

    Jeff Nugent Junior Member

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    Dan, I would try potting some up in big pots with lots of new compost around the root ball and bring them indoors to a north facing window. Do save some seed though.
    Don't count on capsicums over winter though, resort to broccolli. If successful you should have early capsicums next season. It works in our climate but we're about the same latitude as Sydney.
     
  3. d_donahoo

    d_donahoo Junior Member

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    hey Jeff,

    will do...and will ahve a shot at winter tomatoes too?

    have you grown pepper before? is it worth it in green house conditions?

    what are your thoughts on the tasmainia mountain pepper?
    we have two young trees that seem to be doing well...how long before they start producing fruit?

    have you had much success growing it?

    dan
     
  4. trish

    trish Junior Member

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    Hi Dan,
    I live in NE Vic and have also had some success with overwintering capsicums and other Solanums, either as Jeff suggested by potting up and putting somewhere sheltered (indoors near window or just in a spot out of the wind on the verandah), or by providing some form of protection where they are in the ground. Depending on how much frost you get, this protection could range from lots of mulch and other vegetation nearby (heat sink idea's a good one!) to mini-cloche setups using stakes and clear plastic. Don't expect to get fruit over winter, but they will provide a nice early crop next season while your new plants get established. I select a couple of plants from new plantings each year to overwinter and then replace them the next year. I haven't grown pepper before, so can't help with that one. Glad to hear you're into the open-pollinated/heirloom veges - gotta keep that genetic diversity going! Cheers and good luck,
    Trish.
     
  5. d_donahoo

    d_donahoo Junior Member

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    trish -

    thanks heaps. plenty of clear plastic that i got from a nursery and knew would come in handy. the mulch thing i get confused with...jackie french talks about mulching the entire plant? but wouldn't that cause it to rot over time if it heats up - or impead growing due to lack of sunlight?

    oh - and while we are at it? anyone planeted chickpeas before? is now a good time?

    dan
     
  6. Jeff Nugent

    Jeff Nugent Junior Member

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    Dan,
    Have a try at planting some young capsicum and tomatoe plants in the hot house at the same time and see which do best and be sure to report back so we all learn from it.
    Never got my Tassy Mountain Pepper seed to germinate. Schinus Molle seed is a pepper substitute and grows (almost) anywhere. There are others too.
    By pepper, I asume you mean Piper nigrum. We have Columbus to thank for this confusion he went looking for a short route to India to trade spices. First sign of land he assumed it was India, called the people Indians and the hottest plant he could find was pepper (chilli). :angry: Some people just see what they want to see.
    No it's never been at the front of my ever-growing priority list.
     

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