Keeping Quail as an egg and meat source?

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by ButterflyGirl, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. ButterflyGirl

    ButterflyGirl Junior Member

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    As part of trying to live more sustainably (and take responsibility for our meat consumption) I am investigating some different sources of meat which we can breed, raise and "process" ourself.

    One of these options is Quail.

    I have seen Jap quail advertised locally, are these one of the more popular breeds for both egg and meat production? Is there other breeds which are better suited?

    How easy are they to breed? Do they go broody easily or do you need an incubator or a surrogate broody hen of some sort? How often will you get chicks and how many are the normal size? (obviously you need to not eat the eggs for this to happen).

    What is a good ratio of male to female birds? and what sort of area do they need per bird? (thinking of using an average 1.8m X 1.8m avairy)

    Cheers,
    Vanessa

    PS I am from Adelaide, South Australia (haven't got to changing my profile yet)
     
  2. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Well, here in Oregon I have CA Quail wild on the property. Each year one couple makes about 10 babies, and I have seen 3 groups on the property, literally loving my deadwood swales on contour. Makes them feel safe. The babies are very very tiny. Not really an egg source unless it is for a specialty market like high end restaurants, and even then generally used in a soup or special sauce. It was common to see them deep fried at Dim Sum parlors in San Francisco when in that area.

    Meat wise, sadly, I am an American and I could most likely eat 10 in 1 sitting.
     
  3. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Guinea pigs are another single serve sized, easy to grow at home, protein snack.
     
  4. mouseinthehouse

    mouseinthehouse Junior Member

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    That single sentence disturbed me so much my whole body convulsed. Ugh. Now I am incredibly saddened. :(
     
  5. annette

    annette Junior Member

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    Be glad you don't live in south America. They breed them in the kitchens and just pick one up and use it in the meal. A bit like us plucking herbs or lettuce.

    I can't even stand to look at them let alone eat one.
     
  6. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Guinea pigs as a protein source.

    Frank has gone to heaven since this was made (no he didn't choke on a guinea pig!) but Elisabeth is a regular at my local permie group and she is still going strong.
     

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