Is kikuyu grass low in sugar

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by dreuky, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. dreuky

    dreuky Junior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I have put this under raising animals because I am trying to find out if kikuyu grass is suitable for a horse that is laminitic and so must eat grasses low in sugar. I have tried google but the answers I get are all about kikuyu having oxalates in it that reduce the animal's ability to take up calcium. I know about that and can deal with that. It is the need for low sugar that I am trying to find out about
     
  2. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Where U????

    8)
    There are some issues with K and horses!!
    But a little shouldnt hurt them!!!:nod:
     
  3. dreuky

    dreuky Junior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    The issues about K is the oxalates which i know about and are quite easily dealt with. but what i am trying to find out is the sugar levels. With horses with laminitis you need to feed low sugar. There is one place on my property that has a fair bit of K and I am thinking if it is low in sugar (which I think it maybe) it would be a good idea to enlarge this area to be used in spring and autumn the two times of year that the sugar levels in grass go through the roof and a horse that is prone to laminitis will get it
    I'm at Milang SA the bottom of the Murray
     
  4. Terra

    Terra Moderator

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    757
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I would say be careful , I put my horses in a paddock where there is lots of kikuyu when I sold my place and was so busy with the move (didn't have to feed daily) they came out of there FAT as pigs .

    I know there is 10 million things on the internet , I know and respect Crisanne as you know doubt have already found out there is more to laminitis than just feed .

    hope this helps .

    Katys site

    https://www.safergrass.org/articles.html

    Crisannes site

    https://www.equethy.com/page12.htm
     
  5. dreuky

    dreuky Junior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Thanks Terra. The sites were worth looking at. If your horses got fat on kikuyu that probably says it all. I think I will have to look into native grasses. I have a very small patch which I was hoping to increase by just sparing those seeds maybe I will have to bit the bullet and buy some seed. Only problem is native seed is expensive!!
     
  6. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Collect native seed from roadside = free!!!
    or there may b landcare groups in SA who deal in native seeds Elemyus ,,Danthonia, microlena etc good stock fodder
     
  7. dreuky

    dreuky Junior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Native grass is definitely on my wish list and as I move around the district I have been noting any native grass areas so that I can come back when they are in seed.
    Horse SA is holding a workshop on native grasses for horses next weekend which I am going to. Hopefully I can get some good tips from that.
     

Share This Page

-->