Intern/Volunteer at Chaikuni Institute in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest...

Discussion in 'Jobs, projects, courses, training, WWOOFing, volun' started by Nick Boyce, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. Nick Boyce

    Nick Boyce Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi all,

    The Chaikuni Institute is a non-profit organization and educational hub working for a truly sustainable future for the Peruvian Amazon. Through the union of ancient indigenous traditions with contemporary Permaculture design, we teach and apply regenerative community-based development practices in Amazonian communities. We bring together people from across the planet with indigenous people of the Peruvian Amazon to co-vision and commit to a common goal – working collectively for the protection of the Amazon rainforest, her people, traditions and biodiversity. More info here - https://chaikuni.org/about-us/

    The Chaikuni Institute is currently in the process of design and development. Our current focus is on developing the permaculture plan and systems on our 175 hectare site, (https://terraphoenixdesign.com/portfolio/temple) which we will use as a base for our future education, research and outreach projects. Your participation will be vital in helping us grow and realize our vision.

    Currently we have two opportunities on offer right now to volunteer or intern, the main difference is the amount of time and thus responsibilities you will take on. For the full description and to apply please see here - https://chaikuni.org/education/internship/

    We hope this interests many of you and to hear from you soon,
    Nick
    Permaculture Coordinator at Chaikuni Institute
    "Catalyzing a regenerative movement in the Amazon"
    www.chaikuni.org
     
  2. luzytierra

    luzytierra Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    With all the respect for the project and the people involved in it, I have a question: Why an Intern or a volunteer has to PAY and WORK for you?
    Especially since it is a PERMACULTURE project. Shouldn't it be an exchange? my work for food and acoomodation minimum?
    Maybe there is a logical explanation for this, maybe I am missing something just because I don't have experience with a project like this, but I really would like to know which are this reason.
    Thank you very much in advance for your kind answer and I wish you the best of luck to make your project succed!
     
  3. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    2,922
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The income from the provision of Permaculture courses to overseas guests supports free education for people in the Amazon to participate in courses at the Institute to then return to their communities and implement new projects...

    Source: Chaikuni Institute (2013) How We Work
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
  5. luzytierra

    luzytierra Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I haven't read this...maybe, since I am not "overseas" but from the same continent I woill not be charged...or maybe I will be charge in terms of my country economy ;)
     
  6. luzytierra

    luzytierra Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thank you eco4560 I am reading the thread you suggested. It is indeed a very difficult subject. For me it is especially difficult since I decided to leave the "system" and I am mostly surviving ever since. So, learning about Permaculture it is getting more and more difficult for me. I may end up getting a regular job anytime soon :(
     
  7. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    2,922
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Maybe, on both counts. Or maybe you might be charged whatever you can afford to pay? I'm sure Nick from the OP will return to answer your question. Or, if you can't wait, send him an email and ask him.

    Of course, there is another option for you to engage in permaculture work in exchange for food and accommodation: WWOOF Argentina.
     
  8. luzytierra

    luzytierra Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thank you ecodharmamark ! I am actually a member in WWOOF Argentina. Unfortunately wwoof doesn't seem to work in Argentina asit does in other countries from the first world. Here, we are asked a contribution for our food in most cases. I imagine that economic situation of the country has an influence on how this organizations actually work...beyond theory on how they should work.
    But, tahnks a lot for trying to help!
     
  9. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    2,922
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh, I see . There was no mention of that on the WWOOF Argentina website. I do know that even here, in Australia, some (very few) WWOOF hosts will ask for a monetary contribution. It really goes against the tradition of WWOOFing - that being a free cultural/work exchange: a fair days work, for a fair days pay (warm/dry bed, nutritious meals, opportunities to engage in local/bioregional cultural activities). I do understand that in some instances, particularly when host farms/enterprises are affected by drought, etc., or the local economy is in downturn, that hosts may not be able to afford to have WWOOFers stay. But in these cases, I think hosts should at least be honest and either state up front that this is the case (as perhaps they are doing in Argentina?), or they should stop hosting for a period of time until personal/regional economic factors are better (as I know some in Australia do).

    Either way, on the WWOOF Latin America (the umbrella host of all Latin American WWOOF organisations) website, it is stated (my emphasis in bold):

    Farms listed in WWOOF organizations are part of a world-wide effort to promote the concept of organic farming, sustainable agriculture and responsible consumer habits. As part of this effort, host farms offer WWOOF members the opportunity to learn by doing. Listed farms will host WWOOF members free of charge. As a guest in a WWOOF farm your learning experience is based on you participating in the daily chores of running the farm. In doing so, you can learn a variety of techniques employed by member farms including organic farming, Permaculture and Biodynamics. In addition to learning about organic farming, you can also learn about the local ecology and culture while getting to meet fun and interesting people. Your daily chores at WWOOF farms may include harvesting, preparing soil for planting, milking, cleaning pens, digging trenches, maintaining fences and such; and generally involve about 5 to 7 hours per day, 5 to 6 days per week. Each farm has its own chores, rules and schedules.

    I guess it is that last emboldened sentence that encourages individual hosts to ask for money. Still, there is an expectation as per the first emboldened sentence that this will be an exception to the rule, rather than the norm. I wonder, have you studied all of the other WWOOF organisations across Latin America to see if you will be expected to pay for the privilege of being a WWOOFer?

    Whatever the case may be, good luck on your journey, and please keep us posted as to your experiences.
     
  10. luzytierra

    luzytierra Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If you check the forums in WWOOF LatinAmerica you will find threads disscussing this issue, because they are charging pretty much everywhere. Though it's truth that when they decide to dothis they should retire from the site. But, if nobody makes an officil complaint they manage to continue on the site. I actually had been as a volunteer in a farm here in Argentina who had been in wwoof but then they had been retired because of a formal complaint. Effectively, they were asking for a monetary contribution.
    I will keep you updated on my "journey", I am trying to make my way in Permaculture...maybe I succed ;)
     
  11. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    2,922
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I wonder to what degree is it to with need, as opposed to greed? Capitalism corrupts even the most resistant of platforms, and it would be a shame to see the WWOOF ideal go down this path across Latin America.

    As an aside, I realise that you wish to 'transition' toward a permaculture way of life. However, I wonder if you could not use your skills as a biotechnologist in another form of voluntary research work in exchange for food and accommodation (i.e. a scholarship), and at the same time still further your ambition to further the permaculture cause? I'm thinking about one of the more reputable organisations as a starting point, such as Scientists Without Borders.
     
  12. matto

    matto Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Messages:
    685
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Pretty much all the farms I saw in Latin America would want a contribution towards food costs, up to $5 per day, or provide your own. Most where trying to build their operations, being a moderately rich gringo it didn't really bother me paying. Staying longer (3months+) you could increase food security by the work that you do there.

    Depends on how much you want to invest yourself in a project, and what your motivations for being there are. Australia's WWOOF org is great for applied learning on established farms, but its a shame they let in all the conventional growers...
     
  13. luzytierra

    luzytierra Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thank you so much! I do consider scholarships. Until last year I had a scholarship and that is how I managed to get my PhD. I didn't apply for a pos-doc scholarship because I wanted to dedicate myself to this full-time. During this past year I used my saving to travel colunteering and learning, I also took the PDC and now I run out of money so... I did consider to apply for another scholarship, but that is what I cosnider going back to the system and a little bit like failure too. Anyways if I have no choice, I will of course.
    Thanks for the data of those scholarships, I had never heard of them :D
     
  14. Nick Boyce

    Nick Boyce Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Luzy - Thank you for your interest and fair questions.

    To explain further our situation right now; we are searching for a team of skilled people to commit to making the whole of Chaikuni a reality. We have made significant progress but need more people to come on board. In fact this program is searching for people to live here and really become a part of it all. It is not a money maker, the costs of someone living on our site in the jungle is extremely high and so we are asking for payment with an emphasis on price to get people to commit for 6 months. In that time we can make an assessment if the project can then support them in return.

    Also to understand more fully who we are, we are actually an indigenous plant healing retreat centre with 80 guests coming a month. Relatively remote we are a boat ride and an hours hike away from the remote city of Iquitos. We employ over 80 people to make all this happen, giving huge benefits to our local area. The permaculture aspect of the centre is relatively new but there is a real drive to make it happen so that we can make even more happen here. The point I'm making is that we have significant things to offer people coming here. A remote land to do permaculture work in the lungs of the world and also all the facilities to make it happen. To be clear we offer private accommodation, food, traditional indigenous plant healing, professional teachers instructing in permaculture, yoga, tai chi, chi gong, meditation and more.

    All this being said, if someone with excellent skills and commitment writes to us but cannot afford to pay these costs we would do everything we can to support them in coming.

    I hope this brings clarity and appreciate any further questions,
    Nick
     
  15. Nick Boyce

    Nick Boyce Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

Share This Page

-->