Incorporating a mound of dirt

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by Brown grnthumb, Sep 14, 2009.

  1. Brown grnthumb

    Brown grnthumb Junior Member

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    So I have decided the plots that are to be made; 4 mandalas and keyholes with three raised rectangular beds but now I have a giant mound of earth to contend with and I have no idea what to do with it. I tried to see if I could pack it then terrace it but the mound is too steep, the topsoil to crumbly and since I want to maximize the amount of beds I want to try and incorporate it as a major feature.

    I am reading a book called Rainwater harvesting for drylands and beyond vol.1 which does help abit on water harvesting but not on using the mound & because its not a natural feature and is never really an obstacle for people I have yet been able to find a book to help me on the matter.

    Since I want atleast another 5 areas marked out (Including the surrounding flatland around the mound) I need to find a way to use it. So what do you think a good option would be?

    (Add please something even if you've never tried it since I can't stand to see massive views with little or no replies!!!! :D )
     
  2. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    Consider a tower of power "browny", an antenna to the cosmos. These structures which are modelled on the Celtic stone towers in Ireland, show great promise for boosting productivity through the use of radionics.
    remember to have fun
    regards
    intent-observation intuition :wink:
     
  3. Brown grnthumb

    Brown grnthumb Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    Oh I've seen that before on Rawmodel; its this right?

    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/_f4ch8yJ1cZw/S ... +Tower.jpg

    I so couldn't get away with that in this city; to much of a liability. Plus I bet the other church would have a fit if I told them what it is (the church who owns the land wouldn't have an issue since the congregation seems to like those sort of things).

    Biodynamic farming seems interesting though, something I'd like to introduce but I know didley-squat on it other than the most basic. How much would it be to get a Stiener school teacher to explain his philosophies you think?
     
  4. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    A really tall herb spiral :wink:

    Have the local religious person bless it and sell it in 1 kg bags as holy dirt?

    You did say ANY suggestions right?
     
  6. gbell

    gbell Junior Member

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  7. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    You are not wrong gbell - so much in nature is unexplained that we need to be very cautious in much of what we do.
    The energies associated with radionics have been known of for a long time. Water divining, moon planting and Ester Deans "pendulum dousing" all use these energies however there is no money to be made in them so they remain unscientific for the want of a grant from "interested organizations" to allow an academic to live while studies are done. This is not permaculture. I do think - however that permaculture, as a design system, has plenty of resilience to allow discussion on the occult.
    We must needs to keep it light and as always only do it if it is fun.
    respectfully, purplepear.
    intent-observation-intuition 8)
     
  8. gemjill

    gemjill Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    G'day
    got no ideas about the mound, sorry.

    But I agree with gbell
    There is actually alot of money being made from those very practices you describe purplepear; astrology alone is a huge industry that people are making fortunes out of.
    Surely in a continent as dry as Australia if water dousing worked a douser would be set up for life?
    These practices have been extensively examined by the scientific community and have been found wanting; apart from the fact that sap in plants rises and falls with the moon.
    cheers
     
  9. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    Hehe

    I'm gonna sit back and watch this one go like wild fire...
     
  10. Brown grnthumb

    Brown grnthumb Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    ^ Not gonna let that happen!

    Psuedoscience and Spirituality aside; I'd really want to incorporate it. I mean its a massive pile with a flat top large enough to fit two volkswagon beetles; there has got to be something that can be done to use the sides.

    Should I try and remove soil from the top to allow the sides to have a lesser grade?
     
  11. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    Have you considered building a 'cellar' underneath a mound of dirt? I have been thinking about doing this myself for sometime using and old shipping container but I haven't manifested a shipping container into my life yet. Perhaps I need to start looking at a different design.

    There is an old thread somewhere to do with building a root cellar with some great plans in it...
     
  12. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    If it were mine I would move it to rows on contour to increase easily accessible growing space , harvest water and create micro climates but as is usual that is site specific . If I had flat land I would probably make a spiral out of it or a big key hole with a water source in the centre . a place to sit might be nice.if you really want to go up you could make a giant herb type spiral with a path or steps going up it I would like a well in the middle or at least a bird bath.
     
  13. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    not this time grahame - it takes two to tango and I don't feel like dancing.
    I have heard responses like that before - as though it all about money :rolleyes:
    intent-observation-intuition
     
  14. Ojo

    Ojo Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    erosion will take care of it if it isn't planted and or terraced fairly soon, a couple good rains will move alot of loose dirt.

    https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/feature/backyard/terrac.html
    https://www.fao.org/ag/agl/agll/wocat/wq ... stid=TAJ04

    Other Options for Slopes

    If terraces are beyond the limits of your time or money, you may want to consider other options for backyard slopes. If you have a slope that is hard to mow, consider using groundcovers other than grass. There are many plants adapted to a wide range of light and moisture conditions that require little care, but provide soil erosion protection. These include:

    * Juniper (Juniperus horizontalis)
    * Pachysandra (Pachysandra terminalis)
    * Wintercreeper (Euonymus fortunei)
    * Periwinkle (Vinca minor)
    * Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster spp.)
    * Potentilla (Potentilla spp.)
    * Partridge berry (Gaultheria procumbens)
    * Heathers and heaths
    excerpt
    https://www.doityourself.com/stry/gardenterraces
     
  15. Brown grnthumb

    Brown grnthumb Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    Would it be possible to get a ground cover to grow tell the roots grow in deep; than cut the tops mulch and grow from the more stable soil or is that way unneeded and over complicated?
     
  16. Ojo

    Ojo Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    I'd start mulching it right away, maybe vertical mulching would be easier.


    Vertical mulching, or placing straw, sticks, or brush upright in the soil is one of the best methods for protecting denuded areas and encouraging plant establishment. This treatment increases water capture and retention; provides safe sites for seeds and seedlings; traps blowing dust; slows water erosion; and provides moisture and a source of organic matter to the below-ground soil ecosystem. Vertical mulch can discourage traffic, walking or driving, by providing a visual and physical barrier.
    excerpt
    https://www.sci.sdsu.edu/SERG/techniques/erosion.html

    https://www.laspilitas.com/garden/howto/slope.html
     
  17. lovingmygarden

    lovingmygarden Junior Member

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    Re: Incorporating a mound of dirt

    My son woulslove your dirt pile, he would turn it into a bmx jump ha ha ha, that`s what our big mulch pile currently is lol :wink:
     

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