Ideas for a hot water pool...

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by redjohanna, Jun 24, 2011.

  1. redjohanna

    redjohanna Junior Member

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    Hi all,
    We dont have a bath here (only a shower) and miss a good soak.
    Ive been thinking about an idea for a hot water pool and could use some advice.
    Here are my plans so far:
    1. Get an old round concrete or plastic stock trough. Deep enough to sit in.
    2. Place in a nice spot in the garden. Add plants and rocks around for effect
    3. Use an old Jotul wood heater we have here to heat water via a water jacket
    4. Use some type of thermosiphon system to drop heated water in to the pool and circulate cool water to be reheated

    Would then use no power and water is only heated via the wood stove when needed. We may need to be super organised and fire it up well in advance of anticipated time of use. Water supply is no problem...got more than enough of that...
    We could then use as a cool pool in summer Do you think this is do able?
    Any helpful hints as I am no plumbing expert?
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    Saw an old bathtub sitting up on blocks that was heated by a fire underneath .
    A wooden grid kept backside from burning .

    I am planing a Besser block hot tub in my back yard .
     
  3. adrians

    adrians Junior Member

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    sounds like a good plan.
    For a thermosyphon to work, you will need the tub (or a tank) at a higher level than the fire.. so maybe a bath with a view?
     
  4. jeff

    jeff Junior Member

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    A plastic tub would be better as it would absorb much less heat than concrete.
    How are you going to sanitise the water?
     
  5. Terra

    Terra Moderator

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    Another thermosiphon option is a heater made from a motorvehicle radiator painted black enclosed in a box with a glass panel . Salt water will be easier to sanitise .
     
  6. jeff

    jeff Junior Member

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    Being able to regulate the water temp would be necessary as it could be difficult to get a constant 'just right' temp otherwise.
    A water jacket system would need to keep circulating I think?....and continue to heat the water.
    You don't want to end up looking like a cooked prawn!

    Salt sanitisation will need electricity which doesn't sound appealing to redjohana.
    Heating healthy pond water may be a solution. When the water returns to about 25 c it can be returned to the pond. Which would need a bio filter and plants.
    And you can swim in the pond in summer.
     
  7. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    Here's a commercial version of the thermosiphon idea (this one runs on gas or woodfire) https://www.kiwitub.com/technical/howitworks.htm

    Are you talking about a heated bath or something much bigger?

    You don't need to sanitise the water, just replace each time and empty into your grey water bed.

    Cast iron or steel baths with a fire under them are common in NZ. The fire means the water keep getting hotter (you put a wooden frame in the bath so your bum doesn't get burnt). Very easy to set up.
     
  8. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    wow , that Kiwi-Tub system is great .
     
  9. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    Very cool isn't it. Out of my budget currently, but a very good long term investment - it looks made to last a long time. Something I'd consider as part of powerdown preparation. You can heat smaller amounts of water with the burner too, eg in a 40 gallon drum or a bath.
     
  10. ppp

    ppp Junior Member

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    "sanitise the water" huh?
    why?

    Why would you sanitise it? - water the garden with it when it's cooled after you're done... perhaps you should pee in it for good measure.
     
  11. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    I have seen a similar version made with cob. I am wondering about a cob oven version... make your bread, then go for a soak later in the day.
     
  12. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    As a Boy Scout , I remember using a 'donkey' made from an old 20 lt steel drum for heating water on a camping trip .
    It was laying on its side in a specially made support , and had a funnel that screwed into the large hole on the lid .
    This was at the lowest point [ from memory ] and every time you added cold water , hot water would come out of a pipe screwed into the small bung hole up the top . Thin steel , drums are made of now would not last long , but a stainless steel beer keg would be xclnt . I plan on getting a new u-beut instantaneous gas water heater when my old electric dies .
     
  13. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    The kiwitub was based on the old thermette technology, which is a kind of rocket stove. I assume rocket stoves are better for thermosiphoning because of their intense heat.

    Have to admit, despite all the lovely baths I've had with a fire under a steel bath, they're not very efficient and a rocketstove set up would be a big improvemnt.
     
  14. jeff

    jeff Junior Member

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    Going by the op's description of a hot pool and a cool pool for summer, I thought of something a little larger than a bath.
    A stock trough was mentioned.
    Are we still saving water?
    Retaining the water has been the basis for my thoughts of treating the water either chemically or biologically.
    I guess it depends on how much water one has.

    Would I sanitize a bathfull? No. Would I pee in my pool? No. But it wouldn't matter if I did 'cause there are a gazzillion bacteria in the bio filter. :)
     
  15. redjohanna

    redjohanna Junior Member

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    Kiwi tub looks great! I only need the burner thingy though
     
  16. redjohanna

    redjohanna Junior Member

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    Thanks for all the ideas guys...much appreciated! Jeff, we have no need to save water here. The tanks are overflowing and the annual rainfall is about 2000mm.
    I still wouldnt pee in it :). The other half has taken this idea and run with it and we now have plans and a clear area for a waterfall and lake as well as the hot pool. The idea would be to plant out with things that are indigenous to this area and attract frogs and other wildlife...I know...there will be snakes...but thats cool too. The grey water from the house could also be diverted through a bio filter area. Only problem is not enough clay to hold the water. Does anyone know about dam liners?
    I can get 8m wide by whatever length we need. Would this be suitable for the lake/dam?
    Any other considerations?
     
  17. jeff

    jeff Junior Member

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    Firestone make an excellent product called 'pondgard' which in EPDM rubber liner.
    Only comes in black though, but black gives beautiful reflections on the water surface.
    The largest sheet available is 60m x 15m. It can be joined and there are many other smaller sizes available.
    I used pondgard in my pool.
     
  18. theradiator

    theradiator New Member

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    Kiwitub is designed for out-of-doors, manual operation under adult supervision. It does not have an automatic temperature regulator. Just turn off the gas or stop feeding the fire when the water is hot enough. It's that simple.
     

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