I humbly request an explanation...

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Pakanohida, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Please explain the differences between biodynamic farming, & companion planting with organic farming practices that do NOT involve chemicals?



    I ask because here at my place, I do not fit in Organic farming, I am beyond it. No chemicals, no herbicides, no -icides. I try to do as much companion planting as possible and am learning better to plant for mulch etc. I would say I am trying to be as hardcore as Fukuoka after he had it all figured out. I do have daikon growing wild on the property even already. I am even re-trying a E. Hazlip bed system.

    I know nada about biodynamic farming other then someone named Stien coined it and grew some decent cherry tomatoes.



    If you are not familiar with E. Hazlip, here ya go.
    [video=youtube;Oy_x5rXq19g]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oy_x5rXq19g[/video]
     
  2. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

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    The primary concept behind Biodynamics, as I understand it, is that it works with the energetic properties of materials in a way that is more metaphysical than scientific, so it is a more spiritual approach to growing plants than some other methods. It seems to have some aspects in common with homeopathy in that very small amounts of the energetic preparations are used.
     
  3. mluthi69

    mluthi69 Junior Member

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  4. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    When I looked into biodynamics some of it required stuffing horns with blood meal and the like. I don't want to do that, and I don't want to create more need for horns. But some of the reasons why the biodynamic preparations are the way they are is because they might....I can't guarantee this....conduct electricity into the soil. Rocks like granite and basalt also do that, so burying rocks down a couple of feet will help. Not sure if the volcanic rocks are where you are, but the mountains running down this continent have made amazing volcanic soil.

    Teas that are oxygenated are very good and not so woo-woo, compost tea, stinging nettle tea, alfalfa tea. I make thistle tea. I don't have electricity to run a pump for oxygenation, but a leaf rake, or a child's leaf rake if you have a small container, stirred rapidly creates lots of oxygen bubbles and done several times a day works nicely.

    Teas are a very nice way to make a small amount of soil amend go a long ways. Something I might spread for 25 feet can go 100 feet in tea form.

    The other person you might want to check out is Ruth Stout. She was before Hazelip and a lot less work. There are 2 YouTube videos with her in them, she's one of the amazing pioneers. She and her husband were thought to be extremely radical at the time, 1940's, and she talks a lot about not caring what others think. But her gardening methods are excellent, and I use them on clay soil with great success. Also see part 2. This is part 1

    https://youtu.be/Tt-KHUITId8
     
  5. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    So where does this leave me? Synergistic? Bio-dynamic? Organic? Super Star Happy Fun Time Organic? Hmmm.

    Oh, yeah, and I am with you. I am not adding bone meal and so on. I would rather plant different plants according to soil type and work within a natural forest, i.e. companion planting.
     
  6. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    You are Pak, and you are doing what you believe is best. Why is a label important?
     
  7. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

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    What's wrong with the label "permaculture"?
     
  8. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Vermiculture is another fabulous thing to do. I put the worm towers right into the soil and they come and go taking their castings with them, I don't have to be responsible for more equipment and their containment. I am extra vigilant about moles, but they aren't too hard to control.

    https://youtu.be/lIyEQoxgocY

    Because everyone's situation is slightly different, or extremely different, taking something from each category is usually what happens. Remember, it's illegal to use the word "organic" in any commercial way unless you have the certification, which IMHO I think has turned into big business/government and corporate greed. It's not the grassroots organization it used to be. Their requirements have become preposterous and lots of people, especially small businesses are preferring biodynamic certifications instead. I tink the latest catch-all term is growing Naturally. :)
     
  9. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

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    IMO there is a lot of similarities between natural and biological farming and biodynamics.It is about invoking elements into your system to bring it into balance.Steiner was way ahead of his time and as such is not fully understood by science ,therefore is easily dismissed by most. As we collectively move away from fossil fuel use biodynamics will become more prevalent.
    Biodynamics IS beyond Organic as organic is being sublimated and turned into a lie.
    Biodynamics arguably uses less inputs to achieve a more holistic outcome.the biggest obstacle to biodynamics is the understanding of it as it is not possible to understand yet that does not stop it working so if you are the type of person who can believe in something just because it works then it becomes a valuable tool to incorporate into your permaculture system.
     
  10. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    I got way 'higher' then organic standards if you pardon the pun, or if you don't the pun is still there.

    As for bio-dynamics using less input that is debatable. I saw the "bed system for tomatoes" and all it really is when you come down to it is a compost pile. Of course a tomato is going to do amazing in that circumstance considering the origins of tomatoes.
     
  11. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    Pakman, Like any system it is heavily dependant on the person who is managing it. There are all manner of levels of conventional growing, organic growing and Biodynamic growing, just as there is with growing using permaculture principles. There are probably very few people out there who embrace any of these methods in their purest forms because there are very few people who actually understand them in their purest forms.

    Organics in its purest form will look a lot like biodynamics. Biodynamics really is a form of Organic gardening, or at least the way I view organic gardening.

    My feelings are that...

    Conventional farming is largely a system of economics, its connection with nature is begrudging
    Conventional organics is a system of economics with a do-less-harm approach, its connection with nature is about the consumers
    Organics is largely a system of working with nature, its connection with nature is on the broader physical level
    Biodynamics is a system of working deeply and holistically with nature, including observing and responding to current conditions. It's connection with nature is both physical and spiritual. It is based on a deep understanding of soil behaviour.
    Permaculture (the growing aspects) is a system that helps us design spaces in which all of these techniques could be used in specific reference to our local conditions to create sustainable systems.

    Like all systems, they are only as good as the practitioner. To take that a little further I think the single most effective thing we can do is to work on our inner landscape, and the outer landscape will reflect itself around us.

    That's my quick and dirty. Of course I believe there is a lot more to it.
     

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