How to get rid of snakes?

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by natalex, Apr 2, 2012.

  1. natalex

    natalex Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi,

    How do you deter snakes from your properties? Any ideas please?
    I have two young children so I am very concerned about venomous snakes.

    Thanks to all in advance. :(
     
  2. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've found that kids don't actually eat all that many snakes....:think:;)
     
  3. emilyjane

    emilyjane Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We have a lot of snakes around, and a very curious kelpie puppy, which isn't a good combination. We had a brown snake whose daily path went right though our veggie patch - apparently they tend to have fairly set routines so if you keep an eye out around your house and see one, you'll probably see it in the same place the next day at a similar time. The same brown snake then had a bit of a party in our compost heap eating mice, mice will definitely attract snakes so if you can keep the mice away that will help. We called a snake catcher who caught and relocated that particular snake and that solved our problem.

    We bought some of those solar powered snake deterrents that are supposed to send vibrations through the ground to deter snakes, but the snake catcher said they don't work so don't waste your money on those...
     
  4. permup

    permup Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Snakes are just part of the ecosystem and if you are lucky enough to have them, only add to the biodiversity of your land. It can be a lot of fun for children to learn about snakes, how to identify different types and how to stay away from danger. Maybe visit a reptile park and help them to develop a love for snakes rather than a fear.
     
  5. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I stomp around to let them know when I'm about.
     
  6. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I couldn't agree more. Education is the key not mass killing.
     
  7. annette

    annette Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2010
    Messages:
    889
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Hi Emily

    Keep your garden free from vegetation around the edges if you can. Snakes will be around. They eat vermin and do what snakes do. I have lots around here. When I go into the scrub i wear my big gum boots and streong gloves. Other than that I just watch them. Do not be scared of them. Just be observant and conscious of them. Learn first aid just in case. We need to learn to live with nature. the kids should love looking at the discarded skins. Renewal. A good learning for the kids. And a healthy reverence for all creatures is a good thing......
     
  8. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Get some peacocks, geese or guinea fowl.
     
  9. natalex

    natalex Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thank you all. peacocks, geese or guinea fowl sound like a good idea and off course education is the key. :)
     
  10. natalex

    natalex Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  11. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Messages:
    779
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    After finding a rattlesnake in the garden, I cleared the paths around the house and put down light-colored pea gravel, so snakes would be more visible. We also have a lot of coral snakes which are more venomous but less dangerous because small. I advise making paths quite wide, a meter or more, and keep plants from encroaching on them. Teach your kids to stomp around when walking where snakes might be present. Snakes would much rather run away than attack.
     
  12. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,984
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Eat them, save the leather too.
     
  13. emilyjane

    emilyjane Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks, annette. I do get where you're coming from and I'm personally quite fond of snakes (particularly if they are getting rid of mice), but having a puppy who thinks everything that moves is a plaything makes having a snake that close to the house a problem. I quite like my dog, and I prefer her alive, so for us relocation was the best option at the time (sometimes a balance needs to be struck between being idealistic and being practical). I do like the idea of using geese as a snake deterrent so I'll be looking into that, at the very least they might give the dog something to herd and keep her occupied so she's less likely to play with snakes...
     
  14. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    2,215
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    36
    We drill the girls constantly. "Watch out for snakes!", "What do you do if you see a snake?" etc etc. They have a healthy, but not fearful respect for snakes now. I think it is the best think we can do.
     
  15. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    BASS beats

    or is it base!8)
     
  16. Adam

    Adam Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2010
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Someone mentioned avoiding mice and I definitely second this. If you have a lot of snakes, chances are you have a lot of mice and rodents. If you can eliminate the rodent food sources (spilled bird seed, unsecure chicken feed, etc.) you will go a long way to reducing your snake numbers. So if you do decide to keep guinea fowl, or peacocks, do be careful of how you feed them because having food around for the birds could actually attract snakes rather than repel them. A geese is really a good bet since it should be able to eat its fill from grass, garden pests, and weeds, and not really need supplemental feed. (Goslings will likely need to be fed some of starter feed, though).

    Also, similar to what Emily said, try to avoid having places snakes will want to be. A brush pile, rock pile, or pieces of wood laying flat on the ground are all prime snake habitat. If you keep your home free of those areas, the snakes will likely look elsewhere to live.
     
  17. Toga

    Toga Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi,

    This thread is some great food for thought ....

    Born in upstate New York I remember being told about snakes as a kid but had never seen a live snake until moving to Oz in '75.

    I was taught about the high number of poisonous varieties here and the best methods to avoid them, noise. When ever entering a quiet / seldom frequented area for the first time, clap your hands against your thighs, stomp your feet heavily, rustle the stones and leaves as you shuffle your feet. As well as what to do if you get bitten, being Number 1 - Stay Calm! Dont run yell or scream, apply a firm pressure / bandage and immediately seek help. I gained a healthy respect for a critter ive never seen but have been told lives every where here.

    The first snake I did see, was the first one ive been bitten by - a Red Bellied Black Snake when I was 13 on my first Aussie School Camp.
    Overnight I was transformed into an instant Ophidiophobiac. 35 years on im still no huge fan of snakes. I still jump a pole vault every time I see one but manage to deal with them better, which is several times weekly.

    The local varieties ive seen this past 6 weeks of summer alone are Bush python, green tree python, carpet python, red bellied black, keelback, tigers, browns & death adders.

    Yes, an educated & healthy respect for snakes should be taught to all children.

    Toga
     
  18. Farmer Dave

    Farmer Dave New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Our Farm is surrounded by national park, heavy bush and have only seen one snake a red belly. it was only small and just wanted to soak up some sun. 1 year on and I havnt seen anymore. We do have a horse that I would imagine would deture them some what but we also have a large amount of birds Kookaburras and other king fishers, a peacock once visited and a lot of others, I think that our feathered freinds ake care of the baby snakes and keep the population down.

    We have a 4 year old and she is very well informed on wild life her day care teacher was taken aback when she was telling the kids black snakes are bad, Our little girl piped up and told her she was wrong "black snakes are good because they keep the brown snakes away and they are more venomis, red bellys can be found on the east coast of australia" "if you see a black snake walk away slowly they are scarder than you if you see a brown snake stand very still and hope it doesnt see you"
     

Share This Page

-->