Home grown for our own consumtion isn't enough

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by baldcat, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. baldcat

    baldcat Junior Member

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    I would like to be able to provide for my dog as well...
    Anyone wanna share some pet food recipes ?? Surly can 't be that hard to boil up some rice, put in some liver and gravey, add some vegies.. ??

    Well I'm sure thats what I'll do, but just wondering on the nutritional bit and what I should really incude to make he stays healthy...

    I'm over paying a fortune for food for him.. when he'll eat what were eating without any hessitation.
     
  2. forest

    forest Junior Member

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    Dan, I have a very nutritious recipe that I've been feeding my two Airedale Terriers for over 8 years. The vet tells me they are very heatlhy and fit.

    You'll need a large stockpot and several small plastic sealable containers for storing it in the freezer. It makes enough for 7 or 8 days for 2 dogs. I serve them from the pot the first day and I defrost a container each night for them. They love it.

    1 kilo of pet mince from action - it's beef mince
    3 cloves crushed garlic
    1 cup brown rice
    2 cups lentils or barley or soup mix or beans (presoaked)
    2 dessertspoons Vegemite
    3 cups of chopped fresh vegetables of your choice - but remeber dogs can't eat onions
    enough water to fill the pot.

    Combine in the pot and bring to the boil. Simmer for 1 hour.

    :)
     
  3. Richard on Maui

    Richard on Maui Junior Member

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    Take one cat or dog. Remove skin and entrails. Put in a large casserole dish with some home grown taro and herbs of your choice. Bake until tender. Alternatively, as the old Hawaiians used to do their dogs, feed an exclusive diet of sweet potato for some months before spit roasting.

    I am actually very very serious. :rolleyes:
     
  4. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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    Big pot 10-15lt

    1 or 2 kilos bloody coloured pet mix from butcher $1.50, shop around as some mixes are light coloured and full of fat.

    3 cups of rice or wheat
    5 cups of fine chopped vegis, (no onion as it kills dogs like chocolate)
    4 finely chopped garlics cloves
    Any meat or fish scraps, old bread, small bits of cheese anything like that.

    No cooked fish/meat bones.

    8 cups of water, cook everything at once so the bloody meat
    get sucked into the vegis rice etc. cook for 45-50min on a med-low heat.

    Try to cook out all the water, Cook enough for about 4 days as after
    that it starts to smell, not that the dogs mind.

    I add it to old icecream containers and store in the fridge.

    I have also added eggs to the mix but they tend to make them fart, so
    we mix the odd fresh egg into it when we are dishing it up.

    Cook when your not having friends over as the mix stinks a bit. (great for getting rid of those unwanted mother inlaws :lol: )

    If you have a sick dog who is not eatting, warm the food up a little (just warm) it smells and tastes better than cold food, so my dogs tell me.... :wink:

    Garlic wards off fleas and ticks too.
     
  5. earthbound

    earthbound Junior Member

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    Bugger........ Well there is something I never knew, about onions... :shock: :shock:

    I guess I've been lucky that my dog is fairly large and I've never given him large doses, because I have always put onion into my dog food, it's just always been a bit of a standard. Onion, garlic, mince, all the soggy veggies out of the fridge that are a bit beyond it, and then whatever else is around to fill it up, soup grains, split peas, pasta etc..... Oh, and fish sauce and soy sauce for taste...

    I might be a little more carefull with the onion now I know.

    My dog loves fresh eggs and he's pretty good at cracking them and lapping them up, and of course fish, fresh, straight out of the tank, he loves them...

    Joel
     
  6. ~Tullymoor~

    ~Tullymoor~ Junior Member

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    A different slant for you Dan The Man....Dogs don't own saucepans :lol: DTM, TGK, TLL, do a search for BARF, an acronym for Bones and Raw Foods....an Aussie Vet wrote the book...get a copy of it if you can. Very simple to read and it makes *so* much sense. See what you reckon.
    I'm a bit slack these days and don't do it full on, but my dogs live mainly on raw chicken wings and necks :D
     
  7. barely run

    barely run Junior Member

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    Cat biscuits from current Grass roots...would work for dogs too
    100grms of fat chicken or beef
    1/2kg of whole wheat flour
    pinch salt.....(not sure why this is there)
    2teaspoon seaweed
    1-2 cloves garlic
    125grms mince
    crumble fat into flour, add other ingredients and enough water to make a stiff dough. Spread into tray 8mm thick cook 25mins at 200 degree.
    Air dry for about 3 days before us.
    :lol: Too much work for my mind....pet mince raw ..mixed with cooked veges and some dry food was the very economical way we fed our german sheperd. As above dogs need raw meat...it's the way they supposed to eat. and bones too...visiting door to door salespersons are good.
    Cathy
     
  8. Tamandco

    Tamandco Junior Member

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    I do a variation of the BARF diet too.

    My 5 year old Belgian Shepherd eats a diet of raw chicken wings. 3 or 4 a day, depending on how big they are. My vet always compliments me on how lovely and clean his teath are and on his overall condition, coat, weight, etc.

    We buy them for no more than $1.99 per kilo, so they're dirt cheap, a lot more so than canned dog food which I'd never ever give him. He's never had anything with preservatives or artificial anything his entire life. :grommit:

    That's where my variation stops. I'm too lazy! We buy 'Kennel Pack' which is the end of line stuff from the 'Supercoat' factory. Contains no preservatives, artificial colouring, etc, etc, and it's a lot cheaper than many of the other 'quality' feeds.

    We also feed our cat :cat: supercoat dry food, nothing else. It's advertised as a complete food. Anyway, she's way too fat. Just on 12 months old. I'm going to start removing her food bowl every other day cos there's so many rats in the chicken coops, she can go and feast on some of them. :twisted:

    We're still working at building up our supply of breeding Australorps so we can start killing our own chooks for the freezer. I don't think I'd be able to produce our own for $1.99 a kilo, but at least we'd know that it's free from all the other crap stuff we're exposed to by buying commercially.

    Most dogs love carrots. I had a recipe somewhere for doggy carrot cookies. Don't know if they were meant as a treat, or actually part of the diet. I never actually cooked them. If you're interested and don't grow enough of your own carrots (I can never grow good carrots) you can usually get them in 20kg bags from the feed stores, for horses.

    Pat Coleby recommends 'Somethingorrather Kibble' (???) for dogs. I haven't been able to confirm this, but I'm pretty sure she recommends it as a complete diet.

    Some guys at our dog obedience club make up a chicken loaf with rice and vegies. They buy the chicken as necks and put them through the mincer. (They must have a good mincer cos I tried it in my food processor and stuffed the blade :evil: )

    Tam
     
  9. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Here's what I condensed from Carina Beth MacDonald's book Raw Dog Food. She says the guidelines are just general, you should allow for each dog's activity level & metabolism. Start with .5 kilo (1 lb) for a 23 kilo (50 lb) dog, then adjust. One rule of thumb is to feed 2-3% of your dog's ideal weight per day.

    Pricing it out here in the U.S., having to buy nearly everything including veggies because I was working so many hours that I didn't get my garden going, it came out to just about equal to a medium-grade dry dog food per month.

    You are expected to vary the diet enough so the dog gets a good selection. I found that ground beef had too much fat for my dog, so I mixed it with other meats, such as ground turkey, which was often quite cheap.

    BASIC DIET:
    50% raw meaty bones (NO COOKED BONES)
    20% muscle meat (ground meat is often cheapest)
    5-10% organ meat (if you're feeding a lot of chicken backs, bits of organ meat are included, so only give beef liver a few times a month)
    20-25% veggie glop (below), eggs

    MEAT:
    Chicken - all, except leg bones; ground muscle meat; gizzards, liver
    Turkey - necks, backs, ground muscle meat, & innards only
    Beef - necks, ribs, ground meat, heart, liver (don't overdo the liver)
    Pork - necks, steaks, ground muscle meat
    Lamb - shanks, muscle meat
    Rabbit - whole or ground (all parts fine)
    Fish - smelt, anchovies, mackerel, canned fish (no salmon in the U.S. northwest, due to disease called salmon poisoning - highly fatal to dogs)

    (Meat notes: no weight-bearing bones, please. Freezer-burned meat is perfectly good for dogs.)

    VEGGIES:
    Leafy greens should form about half of the veggies, but not iceberg lettuce, which has no nutrition; romaine is great.
    Sweet potatoes (the most nutritious veg), raw or cooked
    Carrots, raw or cooked, juice pulp is fine
    Green beans
    Pumpkin, winter squashes, cooked
    Summer squash
    Asparagus stalks
    Peas
    Celery
    Cucumbers
    Crucifers (cabbage, broccoli, kale, etc) & potatoes, tomatoes only in small amounts
    Fruits - any, but too much will cause diarrhea

    EGGS - one a day is okay, raw (must include yolk) or cooked

    DAIRY- Live culture yogurt, cottage cheese.
    Hard cheese is a TREAT

    BASIC VEGGIE GLOP RECIPE: This can be frozen in daily doses.
    1 kilo (2 lbs) chopped veggies
    2 raw eggs (include shells if using a food processor or blender)
    118 ml (1/2 cup) yogurt (live culture, flavored or not)
    60 ml (1/4 cup) apple cider vinegar
    30 ml (2 Tbsp) blackstrap molasses
    2 cloves garlic
    I usually mixed in the liver here, for flavoring
    5 ml (1 tsp) powdered Vitamin C (calcium ascorbate or sodium ascorbate) or a 250-500 mg tablet per day
    1 Fish oil capsule 3 or 4 times a week, or some flax seed (if not allergic) for Omega-3

    GRAIN:
    Not necessary, but boiled brown rice or soaked or cooked rolled oats can help fill up a high-metabolism dog (18-60 ml per litre / 1 Tbsp to 1/4 cup per quart of glop). Whole grains take longer to digest & can keep them filled up until the next meal. Corn & wheat don't have any real part in a dog's diet, and many dogs are allergic to them, showing in itchy skin. Beans can cause gas & dogs can't utililize the protein very well.

    POSSIBLE SOURCES:
    Farmers markets
    Bulk food warehouses
    Meat wholesalers
    Ethnic markets
    Online supplier groups
    Small farms that do their own processing
    Hunters
    Gr0cery stores - ask about blemished & wilted veggies
    Juice bars for pulp (fresh)
    Grow your own (here's where to use those club-sized zucchini)
     
  10. murray

    murray Junior Member

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  11. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Kiwi: the high-protein fruit!

    Sue
     
  12. frosty

    frosty Junior Member

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    we feed our dog raw meat either beef or kangaroo plus rice when we cook it or dog biscuits .........

    we are a bit naughty with the lack of veggies ...... we dont grow enough to have some for the dog

    and I couldnt buy "poison veggies " for him without feeling too guilty :oops: guilty for feeding him something I wouldnt eat and guilty for supporting the industry :( he does graze a lot maybe thats why :?

    just wanted to ask about eggs ? I had heard somewhere that raw eggs are bad for dogs :? anyone know more

    if they are ok we could feed our pigeon eggs to the dog :lol:

    frosty
     
  13. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    "I had heard somewhere that raw eggs are bad for dogs..."

    The way I hear it is, if you feed the yolks with the whites, there's no problem. But if you feed the yolks alone, it's not good for them.

    Okay, I just looked it up, and found this info at the Boxer Board:

    "Egg whites contain avidin (a glycoprotein) which can readily bind biotin, [which interferes with the B vitamins]. Cooking the egg is a simple solution since it deactivates avidin, but it also deactivates every other protein in the egg (the egg is still nutritional, just not as beneficial as raw). From my research on eating raw egg, the natural design of the egg compensates for the avidin. The solution is the egg yolk which is very rich in biotin (has one of the highest biotin concentrations found in nature). The problem lies if you only eat the egg white, then the avidin binds to the biotin found in the body and this creates a deficiency... Adding other foods rich in biotin can eliminate this problem as well. Foods such as organ meats, whole grains, dairy products, etc."

    The problem probably came when people ate the yolks themselves, or used them for cooking, and fed just the whites to the dog.

    Sue
     
  14. frosty

    frosty Junior Member

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    thanks very much Sue :D

    what do you think about feeding him pigeon eggs ?

    frosty
     
  15. baldcat

    baldcat Junior Member

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    Every Saturday Morning Chips gets an egg put on his food... LOVES IT.. makes his coat all nice and shinny..
     
  16. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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    My two whippets have bones most days too, I many use brisket bones and the local butcher stocks them, I often get a funny look because I stock up on so many of them and keep them in the freezer.

    Our dogs used to eat them in the backyard but when you have 8 chooks trying to steal bits of your bone, the dogs kept having to move or even just walked away from the bone due to the chooks hassling them.

    They now get to have them in the front yard which is outside the dog/chook yard, they are much happier eatting them there.

    I find frozen bones last longer too as it's a bit harder to start with.
     
  17. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    As long as they're reasonably fresh, I don't see a problem with pigeon eggs. Eggs are eggs... well.... as long as they don't have crocodiles in them!

    Sue
     
  18. HoneydaleFarm

    HoneydaleFarm Junior Member

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    During summer I freeze chicken wings in a icecream container of water, and give it to the dogs (well dog now my Malamute passed away :cry: ) and it keeps them happy and hydrated for a good hour or so.

    Fed the malamute on almost exclusively raw diet of chicken, bones and grated veges and cooked brown rice (and she snacked herself through the vege garden and off the strawberry plants) and she outlived all her litter mates! Trying to explain to friends her excitement on seeing raw Broccolli (she would almost wee herself with excitement) was difficult!
     
  19. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    You've heard of International Harvester? Well, I have a five yr old BELGIAN Harvester! She picks and eats her own blueberries, peas, cherry tomatoes & carrots. She is esp voracious with the carrots. I guess maybe a fence is in order if *I* want to eat!

    Sue
     

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