Holmgren Speaks Out For Urban Backyard Food Producers

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by Jez, Dec 5, 2007.

  1. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

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    Recent article from The Age on the movement to make water restrictions a little more flexible and easier to deal with for urban backyard food producers. Quotes David Holmgren and Pam Morgan among others:

    Where to water (Click to view)
     
  2. rhancock

    rhancock Junior Member

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    At least it will get people questioning why the water restrictions are set up the way they are. And if it also gets them to question where their food comes from and what it costs to get it to them, then that's a bonus.
     
  3. paradisi

    paradisi Junior Member

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    Posted this on ausgarden.com.au - - some of us permies might bite the bullet and put finger to keyboard and stir up those politicians a bit. :::::::

    Any overseas permies reading this, please feel free to express your concerns for your Aussie cousins and write to the premier in a state of your choice - the parliamentary contacts are listed below:

    The quote from ausgarden.com.au:


    They quote a study done last year which shows the average dollar of vegies bought in a shop costs over 100 litres of water to produce, yet in the home garden it takes about 20 litres for the same dollar value of vegies.

    So everyone who has a backyard where they grow vegies and fruit and are on water restrictions its now up to you. You have the credible voices to throw at your state politicians (and councillors) to ask them to stop the rot and allow backyard producers to use their hoses so that you can actually save water.

    Quote the article in the Age at them, provide a link to the paper and tell them how you are suffering. I've mentioned it before and I'll mention it again - politicians work on a ratio of 200 to 1 - for everyone person brave enough to stick their necks out and actually phone or write to a politician, there are 200 with similar views who aren't brave enough.

    Make this part of the christmas presents to the community. You can at least privately smile that you at least have tried to change things.

    Google can find your parliament house (or council) and then you just look up who your MP is - if you don't know who he or she is, every site has a search facility based on where you are and every MP (except Philip Ruddock) has an email contact.

    It doesn't even cost you 50 cents for a stamp, just a few minutes to put you thoughts on a computer screen and click send.

    https://www.parliament.qld.gov.au/
    https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/
    https://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/
    https://www.parliament.sa.gov.au/
    https://www.parliament.wa.gov.au/index.htm
    https://www.legassembly.act.gov.au/

    I haven't included NT and Tas - I don't think they have water restrictions, if they do, mia culpa, their sites are in google.
     
  4. Fern O.

    Fern O. Junior Member

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    ... Great article... but I'm not sure why it picks on cactuses... cactuses are delicious! :D
    But I'm glad we finally got our point across... Yah!! :D
    As the one with Marika on the front page of the Age didn't quite get to the point...
    https://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/ ... 80976.html

    cheers!
    Fern

    PS. If anyone wants the embodied water figures and info from David Holmgren, I can email them to you. Perhaps to send onto the pollies?
     
  5. ppp

    ppp Junior Member

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    I saw the article, but only partly agreed.

    Surely we don't want to become an excuse for people to use water unecesaarily and therefore make more dams necessary. Any exception is .. an exception .. giving unscrupulous people a way of explaining away their use.

    I think we should just set outselves up with enough tanks etc, that we don't need to rely on building more dams. Given, I live in brisbane which has plenty of rainfall, but even a modest sized house will collect lots of water in most climates.
     
  6. Fern O.

    Fern O. Junior Member

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    hello pisspoor
    perhaps you've not got the point? :?

    It's about changing government regulations so that there's water allocations, rather than unbalanced water restrictions.


    These water "restrictions" in Victoria allow consumers to have as many showers and spa baths etc. as they please, but places heavy restrictions on watering of gardens.

    If someone lives in an area that hasn't received much rainfall, their tanks will stand empty. Some areas of Victoria, including Melbourne have not received much rainfall. We do have reservoirs of water, and why the "restrictions" are being put in place are because these reservoirs are critically low. But we should be looking where the main use and wastage of this water is. Examining the agricultural water wastage, the abbatoirs (and the huge unnessary water consuming way in which we slaughter animals in our society these days). We should look at all the commercial buildings (and industries as well) and the huge amount of water that they waste. So many highrise buildings and so many toilets that flush gallons of water into the sewers. And how we shit in water (it's bludy ridiculous, unhygenic and so wasteful!).

    But instead the Victorian state government prohibits (or heavily restricts) people using humble amounts of this water to water their vegie patch... and growing your own food, consumes far less water than buying food from the supermarket. (But this is the same government that's just lifted the ban on growing GM canola... Bludy Brumby! Nobody voted him for premier... he needs to be composted... quick!)

    So sure we need to improve our soil (and most importantly look after and increase the micro organisms within the soil) so to improve it's capacity to retain water. We need to shape our land so it captures and holds water where we need it to be held. To slow, sink and spread, and not to let so much of our valuable rainfall, when we receive it, evaporate or run off down into the storm water, sewers and ocean. And to creatively reuse water onsite from our indoor usage of washing ourselves, our clothes, our dishes and being aware of what we put in the water, so that we know what effect it will have with what we reuse the water for.

    If there's water allocations (meaning allocating a set amount of water that people can use, allowing them the freedom to use this water to water their edible garden), then people who are connected to the water mains and live off this supply of water, will start to treat water with respect, they will have to become more aware of their own water usage (otherwise they might run out!). At the moment, a lot of people don't respect water, they don't appreciate their mains supply and they have no awareness or understanding of how precious it is... and it's so incredibly cheap too! For all that infrastructure... and how critically low our water reserves are... I'm connected to mains, and the bill I just received for my 3kL of water usage was only $2.90... isn't that about the price of 600mL of bottled water? It's less than 0.1 of a cent per litre...
     

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