Herbal treatments for malaria and dengue

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Peter Clements, Dec 1, 2005.

  1. Ev

    Ev Junior Member

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    Anyone need someArtemisinin 100mgx60

    Sorry I know i am off topic but this is such a good opportunity for me to pass on my Artemisinin 100mgx 60 bottle that I never had to use expire 12/2007

    While is was in Indo I ordered them from holley pharmaceuticals to arrive in Australia when I got back, have had no problems so they are no longer of use to me.

    These tablets would be of use for someone who travels remote

    PM me for capsules
     
  2. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Sweet Annie' an Artemesia from china is an effective antimal

    Sweet Annie' an Artemesia from china is an effective antimalerial.

    The guppies sound great.

    I have often wondered if it were not better to attract mosquitos and then kill them.

    there are some traps on the market which use CO2 but they cost $1000.00

    I have heard that mosquitoes are attracted to the smell of progesterone.
    Perhaps this could be used as a bait.
    Does anyone have any info on this?
     
  3. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Herbal treatments for malaria and dengue

    Sweet Annie Artemesia annua?
    It is the MAIN treatment for Malaria WORLDWIDE.

    All effective treatments for Malaria have been herbs so far

    With luck our Brisbane scientists should come up with a vacine within two years (see ABC Catalyst).

    You should be able to buy Sweet Annie seeds from Richter's in Canada

    There is a very good design for a cheap home made mozzie trap on this Forum
     
  4. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110824131544.htm
    Has anyone ever heard of Queensland farmers curing themselves of Dengue (orRoss River Fever??) by giving themselves a few jolts on the electric fence?????
     
  5. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    & yet the World Health Organization reallowed the use of DDT in 3rd world developing countries to wipe it out.
     
  6. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

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    In PNG New Britain late 90's red-fleshed, green skinned local paw paw seeds were eaten daily by the locals as a prophylactic, bitter as hell all-nasty! Malaria seemed to affect the Sepik and Goroka boys the worst, the most evil disease that I had seen in my life besides HIV producing AIDS at that stage of my life. Absolutely no scientific evidence read by me as to it's efficacy as an anti-malarial.
     
  7. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Got a botanic name for it?

    Lippea picata is mentioned by Paul Raffaele as a potential/traditional
    herb for treating Maleria (page (Page 99"Among the Great Apes" 2010)
    I can't find any reference to this plant
     
  8. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

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    Rabaul red Paw Paw. most probably a variety of Carica papaya.
     
  9. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    The soft aerial part of Conyza sumatrensis is mixed with other plants i.e. Rauvolfia vomitoria stem bark, lime fruit, Carica papaya mature leaves and Cymbopogom citratus leaves prepared as decoction for the treatment of malaria in western Cameroon (Adjanohoun et al., 1996).

    Caricaceae
    Mature leaves of Carica papaya (paw paw) are widely used to treat malaria and splenomegaly while the fruit is used against anaemia, which can also be caused by malaria (Adjanohoun et al., 1996). The petroleum ether extract of the seed rind of this species showed a considerable antimalarial activity, with an IC50 of 15.19 µg/mL (Bhat and Surolia, 2001). This may be indicative of the presence of highly active compounds in this plant.
    Ngemenya et al (2004) recorded very weak antiplasmodial activity in the leaves and seeds of Carica papaya with IC50 of about 60 µg/mL. However, there is no report on the phytochemistry of this plant with regards to its antiplasmodial activity.

    In the West Province, Carica papaya, Eucalyptus globulus and Psidium guajava leaves are mixed and boiled as a decoction that is drunk for the treatment of malaria. In the same area, stem backs from Mangifera indicus and Citrus sinensis are boiled and drunk or used as a steam bath against malaria.
    In the Southwest of Cameroon, the Bakweris combine the trunk bark and seeds of Turreanthus africanus with Carica papaya leaves, the seeds of Aframomum melegueta and lime, which are boiled and used for treatment of malaria and other fevers, by drinking and or as a steam bath.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2816552/

    Here is a book on the subject
    https://books.google.com.au/books?id=L3lZiwsCZoYC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
     
  10. Don Hansford

    Don Hansford Junior Member

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    Cut the top off a 2 litre soft drink bottle.
    Put about half a cup of water in the bottom half
    Invert the top half, and tape it to the bottom half, so it is like a funnel leading into the bottom half.
    Put a pinch (half a teaspoon or so) of dried yeast into the water (drop it through the funnel piece).
    Place the CO2 trap (which is what you just made) under a bed, behind a cupboard, beside your window, or near a night light

    The yeast in the water produces CO2 (you can add a teaspoon or so of sugar to prolong the production if you need to), which attracts the female mosquito (the only one that bites) - they fly into the funnel, can't find the way back out again, eventually tire and fall into the water and drown.

    In the morning, pour the water (with dead mossies) out into the garden or compost/worm farm and prepare to reset the trap that evening

    Congratulations, MA - you just saved $1000 !!! :party: The least you could do is buy me a beer :D :D :D
     
  11. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Come on we're self-sufficient aren't we?
    Got any yeast left over?:)
     
  12. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Green medicine - from plants to pills

    Talk & Walk
    For thousands of years, plants have been prepared for medicinal use. On this walk through the Garden, you will explore the plants that provide the essential components of many of today’s pharmaceutical medicines. Celebrating International Year of Chemistry.

    When: Sat 19 Nov, 2 - 4 pm
    Where: Meet at the Maiden Theatre
    Cost: $15 Friends $13.00, includes refreshments
    Bookings: 9231 8304
     

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