herb spirals

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by sab, Jun 3, 2005.

  1. sab

    sab Junior Member

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    The only post about herb spirals I found here was a couple of years old. Has anyone got details about how to build one? Is it basically a hill with a spiral running around it that's planted with different herbs.
     
  2. lillypilly

    lillypilly Junior Member

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    I WOULD LOVE DETAILS ON THAT TOO.... :D
     
  3. psychochook

    psychochook Junior Member

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    Hi widgeenut and lillypilly,

    I don't know about any web-sites, but "Introduction to PERMACULTURE" by Bill Mollison and Reny Mia Slay have information about a herb spiral in chapter 5.
     
  4. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Here's a drawing and instructions:

    https://www.mitra.biz/howto_herbspiral.htm

    I am going to build one soon. To cut down on the soil needed and to help retain moisture in the center, I will be piling up some old, rotten chunks of log. This wood is very spongy. I'll see if it works...

    Sue
     
  5. sab

    sab Junior Member

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    Thanks Sue,

    I just did a yahoo search and saw that one (after I posted) Here's another: https://www.permacult.com.au/noosa/herb_spiral.html

    I'd be interested in how well yours 'works'. I'm wondering if it might bake in Aus and just get too hot and dry. This is one of the problems noted by the Noosa group.
     
  6. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    The mounded spiral and herbs may do very well with hot and dry. The desirable oils that herbs produce are a self-protection from heat & sun, PLUS a lot of herbs are from the Mediterranean area, which is hot & dry.

    Maybe the herb spirals are simply MADE for your conditions! Won't know until you try it, right?

    And you could mulch the surface between the plants to keep it from drying out too much.

    Permaculture is an ongoing experiment, just like the rest of life.

    Sue
     
  7. sab

    sab Junior Member

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    I live in an apartment in Manila but am daydreaming (researching/planning) about what to do when we go back to Aus.
     
  8. miss.vitalis

    miss.vitalis Junior Member

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    I was looking for more details on that too!
    by the way, when I was a kid, we had alot od camomille flowering around the house, and I do not see it so often now. I'll try to build a spiral and have some camomille in it too.
     
  9. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Sue, the only thing I can think of that the wood in the center of yours might create is a competition for nitrogen with the herbs. Their roots go deep, and only nitrogen breaks down wood, and because wood has so much more surface contact than the little roots, it gets the nitrogen. Everything would need extra nitrogen in that case.
    But it is a great way to get that wood to break down and over time will improve that soil under there.

    In the diagram on the link you showed, are they saying to sink the rocks into the soil for a few inches, as well as spiral them around? It looks like the rocks are deep enough to be down with the layers of small rocks, newspaper, etc, that they say to pile up there.
     
  10. sab

    sab Junior Member

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  11. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Sweetpea, I intend to cover the rotten wood with composted cow manure ( a good bit of it), then cover with soil. There should be enough nitrogen for everyone to use!

    I would assume the rocks are just embedded enough to hold them in place. You wouldn't want them rolling down the slope and mashing your toes while you're harvesting! If there is a reason to place them deeper, I don't know what it is.

    Sue
     

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