Hello I am Brian

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself Here' started by briansworms, Oct 29, 2011.

  1. Finchj

    Finchj Junior Member

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    Brian, what are you thoughts on feeding worms canine manure? Obviously if they are on dewormers, it would be a horrible idea, but... we have four dogs and I hate either a) bagging and throwing into the garbage as the local government tells us to do or b) throwing it over the fence to accumulate under a pine tree. I was thinking of experimenting with feeding them in a multi-chambered worm bin so if the poo was too much, they could retreat to better territory. Is this a silly idea? Is it dangerous to recycle canine manure in such a way?

    Anyone else have any thoughts on it?

    Anyway, welcome to the forums!
     
  2. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

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    Thanks for the Welcome

    I use a composting bin separate from my breeding tubs and put the dog poo in there. I keep it well stocked with horse manure so this acts as bedding and food. I have two big dogs and they generate a fair bit of poo. I dig down in the horse manure and put the dog poo in the hole and cover it up. No smell and no flies and the worms really enjoy it. It really is no different to any manure in my opinion. They all contain bacteria which the worms eat so there is no smell associated with worm farming. The key here is a lot of worms so plenty of bedding for breeding space

    I would use a couple of bins or some sort of garden bed style of worm farm so you can spread the poo. Put newspaper and old carpet over the top of the bed or bins to keep it all damp and the worms happy. The Gold Coast City Council doesn't promote it which would be purely that if someone got sick and they recommended it could lead to legal problems. As far as I know there has never been anybody gotten sick from eating veggies watered with worm juice that came from worms that ate dog poo. I would eat veggies from it.
     
  3. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Didn't I read a link recently about human effluent treated with worms was more effective at reducing pathogens than most other methods? Can't remember where though.

    Brian: Bicarb of soda used in the compost-holding bin. Any negative effects on worms? What about vinegar, being an acid and all?
     
  4. Finchj

    Finchj Junior Member

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    Alright, thanks for the tip. I think next spring once we have enough worms for another bin we can begin to feed them our dogs waste. I'll probably use that vermicompost on our dynamic accumulators and away from food crops just so we don't freak anyone out. People are so sensitive (not that pathogens are a laughing matter).

    Thank you again Brian!
     
  5. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

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    I heard last weekend at the Markets exactly what you said about the worms and human waste.
    Bi Carb is just Calcium Carbonate ( Limestone from memery). I use Dolomite (Calcium Carbonate and Magnessium) as part of my food mix

    Check out these site. Bruce Galle who owns them is in North Carolina or South Carolina

    https://wormcompostingblog.com/tag/african-nightcrawlers/

    https://thewormexpert.com/
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Brian, my worm bedding 'bubbles' audibly now that I'm adding water and kitchen waste. There is an increase of maggots (not bsf) and small brown ants stealing the food that's lining the surface.

    Personally, I feel I'm adding a tad too much water to keep my towels wet (something heavier needed perhaps) and the worm food, is neither frozen or chopped fine enough.

    The worms seem completely happy when I dig through for them. I speak and sing to them, they open their mouths and talk back. Anything I should be concerned about? The smell is still unnoticeable. I haven't added any amendments such as dolomite.
     
  7. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

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    Definately seems too wet. Dig the maggots out. They will be from fruit scraps. Why are you watering your worms? Are you after the Worm Juice or just watering for the sake of it? What are the towels for? I am assuming as a cover over the top.

    I think the food is fermenting from being too wet. Please don't sing or talk to the worms as this only confuses them and puts them off eating lol.

    Ok lets fix the problem. Tip the worm farm out into a wheelbarrow or similar and leave it in the sun. Get some aged horse manure ( I now put mine through a garden shredder ) and dampen it but not too wet and put it in your now empty farm. By now the worms in the wheelbarrow will have started to go down to the bottom of the heap. Slowly pull away the castings off the top of the heap. Now and then just rub your hand over the top of the heap. This will cause vibration in the pile and assist in getting the worms down deeper. Keep going till you have about half the castings gone. Then mix the rest of the casting and worms in with the horse manure. Cover it over with a wet newspaper and some old carpet. Always leave your tap open, most important.

    With the castings left over put them in a storage tub to dry out a bit and allow any eggs to hatch. After 4 to 5 weeks weeks do the same with the castings as you first did with the worms. This time keep going till you get only worms left. Add thse worms back into your farm and use the castings in your garden. By this time your worms would doubled in population due to the much improved breeding conditions.

    Now the feeding. Don't feed more than they can eat in a couple of days. This amount should start to increase with the higher population. Freeze your veggie scraps and if there is fruit pulp in it dig a small hole in the farm and cover up the scraps. This should stop the fuit fly. Add a handfull of Dolomite once a week to help control the ants. Next check out my Website and tell me where I can make some improvements as I get the impression you are a very smart person.
     
  8. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    I appreciate your advice. My lazy gut instinct is to do nothing and let it dry out some. I'm that lazy, I'm sure that's what I'll do.

    I also worry about my procuring horse poo that hasn't been through a de-worming process as my live-in horse poo supplier moved houses. Technically, and I'm not disputing you, I believe I'm not feeding them enough, the level of the bath has dropped an inch or two. I'm actually surprised about how fast they have done it having never had worms before, besides the intestinal ones, and with those I struggled to observe their habits no matter how hard I looked. I'll feed them less, I'm assuming they have plenty to eat and I'm not sure what, or how much, a full population consumes. As for the compost worms, I'll do similar.

    Is there Sudden Worm Death Syndrome I should worry about? Is your advice something I should follow to the letter to save my colony? Without a garden shredder, I would have to shred each piece of horse manure with my hands, how do I explain that to my family and co-workers? Do you suggest cutting my nails short to avoid manure deposits beneath them? Being a burgeoning environmentalist, I enjoy the fact that there are several life forms enjoying my bounty. The ants (not nesting) and maggots are only working the absolute surface and seem to completely ignore any surface-feeding worms, which tend to be the Red Wrigglers.

    As for your website, don't think for a second that I seem smart. I'm not. I have a lot of people fooled. Just keep your info updated, even post 'News'-related worm links. Keep your info relevant, always fix errors, have consistent formatting (and grammar!), use a spell-check, and make it easy to navigate. Your setup is good now, prices right in front of you, nowhere to look. But, make it more obvious if value for money is your niche. Bold, paragraphing, underlining, titling your prices may help (not all 4, just subtle). Even moving a several 'Buy Now' links to a sidebar may help. Your formatting on your front page isn't consistent (and I only notice because it's all I have in this world), the worm bullet points indent further at the varieties of worms and I see 2 standard bullet points mixed in there too (on Mozilla Firefox). This advice isn't going to change your business at any stretch, you are face-to-face with a website ancillary. Slowly spread yourself over other larger gardening websites, social news aggregators but make sure you include that personal touch (like you have here which is why I'm peppering you for free advice - it is free, isn't it? Are my kneecaps safe?).

    Think articles too, particularly the type that could be posted to an aggregator, or the front page of PRI (long stretch) etc. Building a unique, cheap worm farm with links to Australian prices and products (obviously undercutting your own business but appealing to the newer DIY crowd) is the type of article that could spread (similar to your pond post). The articles need to be thick with information. No BS information, honest and efficient, just like you've been here. For example, the two sites that I kept being drawn to were the two that had full bathtub building guides and that was through Google. Already, if I type 'Worms Southport', you are the second hit after another company. 'Worms Gold Coast' is nowhere to be seen.

    Basically, just be an ethical human. It will be hit or miss, unfortunately.
     
  9. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

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    Hmm I looked at the front page and I have no idea how to change it. I didn't set it up and am just learning how to change things around. The lady who set it up for me did it as a favour and I hate to ask her to change it around. I will copy your post and send it to her to see what she comes up with. I am posting her some African Night Crawlers tomorrow as bit of a pay back for the job she did for me.

    I try to be honest all the time. At the markets when people cant afford a complete farm set up, I tell them to just buy some worms and tell them where to get the tub and tap and how to set it up. I really make nothing out of setting up the farms because I just add the cost to me onto a bucket of worms. They actually get a bucket and a half of worms and worm mix in a farm which makes it the best value of all. One lady actually changed her mind from a bucket to a farm after I told her how to do it as she didn't want to spend the extra money but decided to anyway. She appreciated my honesty. I try to keep my website free of BS too. Be honest all the time, saves you having a good memory to remember to who and what BS you told lol

    I will keep studying your post and see what I can do. Still bit of a computer no hoper at this stage. Thanks for your feedback
     
  10. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

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  11. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I visited a permie property on Saturday and they had 2 bathtubs full of very happy looking worms. I didn't get to ask him what his secret was, but it looked like it had just manure in it. Another bloke started telling me that he felled a banana tree recently, split the lengths of the stem in two and laid them cut side down on the top of his worms and a few days later they were through all the layers of the banana stem. Clever little things!
     
  12. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    I hand aerated at the dismay of the worms, gave the mix a little turn. Took the towels off and it's improved already. The worms still seem happy but a little disappointed at the lack of singing. I'm thinking one more twist of the mix, to get a little more exposed to the surface and wait and see.

    Thanks again.
     
  13. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Maybe you could put a radio on for a few minutes each day - gradually wean them off the singing....
     
  14. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    It's all about the eye contact, Eco. That personal touch.

    I'm just assuming they can see me.
     
  15. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Of course. Seeing eye worms. That could be a new niche market...
     
  16. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

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    You two are still cracking me up. Worms love bananas and horse poo. Mine just live in horse poo and nothing else. You dont need to aerate your worms. They do it themselves. All you are doing is stopping them from feeding for a day or two. I will be checking on my bathtub this week and get a bag of worms off it. I don't need them but it just cleans out the tub a bit so I can add fresh poo.
     
  17. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Aeration, in this context, is to increase the surface area, and expose lower, wetter medium/bedding to drying air. Seems to be working. Similar to your original instructions, but without a complete bedding change. I've stopped feeding for now anyway.

    Now, I need to find a decent horse poo supplier if it's like a luxury worm condominium.
     
  18. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    It was mentioned earlier Brian, do you feel that freezing and un-freezing kitchen waste is sufficient a process to enable quicker turnover by the worms? Would something that mashes/crushes/pulverises/blends the waste first, then frozen, be a superior solution or is cutting fine-ish with a knife enough?
     
  19. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

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    I think if it is cut fine or blended it should be ok without freezing. Potato peels I think still freeze. Cutting just allows extra bacteria to get in thus breaking it down faster and the worms then getting into it sooner..
    Passed on your ideas for my website to my IT Guru. She fixed up some of my attempts to update it lol.
     
  20. briansworms

    briansworms Junior Member

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    As I get smarter and gain more knowledge about the worms and worm farming I am updating my website. Ok maybe getting smarter is over the top but I have updated my website to reflect some new ideas I have discovered.
    I have just realised that my management practices are ok if you just want a worm farm but not good enough to produce consistiently full size fat worms. This has now all changed and in a couple of months I should see a dramatic change in my worm numbers and the size I will have to offer. Just working smarter with better management practices.. Just keeping the passion alive.
     

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