Hello from California

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself Here' started by celia revel, Jun 5, 2014.

  1. celia revel

    celia revel Junior Member

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    Today I potted up ten baby hackberry plants that rooted over the winter and spring from the mother tree, a massive forty foot (twelve meters) high. I promised I'd take good care of her babies and help to extend her progeny. I pulled up and potted five mystery trees that have permaculture promise as they thrive and multiply even during a three year drought. I think they are sasafrass, but they don't have any aroma, and their leaves are fuzzy.

    After fifty years of striving for success in the world we live in, I've finally figured out what I should have known all along. I have almost an acre near a freeway (cheap land on a teacher' salary) to experiment and learn. My intuition tells me that the mediterranean climate of the Central Valley is becoming more arid. Water is first and foremost on my mind, and the only moral way to garden here now, I believe is through catchment. Everyday people don't understand this. Everyone is living as business as usual, and no one is preparing except the politicians and the farmers. Someone is going to have to teach them how to live and grow food some day, so that is my future goal.
     
  2. adiantum

    adiantum Junior Member

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    My guess is your mystery trees might be mulberry, or, more likely, paper-mulberry. Neither are scented, only paper-mulberry is seriously fuzzy (though some true mulberries are a bit "raspy" in texture), and they are more likely to be found in the valley than is sassafras.
    Do you eat the hackberries? Some are better than others. And, of course, they are wonderful for the birds!
    I've been on my site (in the northern central valley) for three years now, and I'm learning how to eat acorns big time! That is what seems to want to grow. Other dry-tolerant trees I'm getting started: olives, pistachios, figs, pomegranate.... All of these grow around and seem to tolerate the climate and even produce without irrigation, although I'm giving them some at the outset to get them established. Establishment is key....
     
  3. celia revel

    celia revel Junior Member

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    Thank You, Thank You. I've been slightly obsessive over this for the past week, and overly curious for two years. That is exactly it. I'm trying to transplant the wee ones that sprout up in the lawn, but they aren't doing so well today, only the big one looks OK. The hackberry tree lets its berries fall around October or November, and by then it is tedious work to sift out the leaves from the berries, which look as if they may have sported a little mold along the way. I tasted a couple, and they are pleasantly sweet, though it takes eons to get any meat off them as they are almost all seed. I need to figure out a way to process them and harvest them more efficiently, and find uses for them. Maybe as a drink. We have one olive and a fig and two pomegranates from seed. I'd like to get a couple of date palms going in the future. Can you tell me how you process the acorns? My daughter has three well established trees in her backyard that she undervalues. She rakes up the acorns to get rid of them, and I take them. Last year I managed to get a cup full of meal into a loaf of bread. That was really good eating.
     
  4. adiantum

    adiantum Junior Member

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    See our blog at udanwest.blogspot.com. The first two posts go into detail about how I process acorns both for myself and for my chickens. Enjoy!
     
  5. celia revel

    celia revel Junior Member

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    Thank You for the link to your blog. I'm very interested in Northern Cali Permaculture, especially the acorns. Looks like you have a beautiful site there.
     

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