Harsh lesson, still learning. Plant Bleaching.

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Pakanohida, May 13, 2015.

  1. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Well, I have had one dickens of a spring so far. 85% of everything transferred outside from veggies to medicinal plants have bleached!

    Now one would think it is from me transferring the plants outside too quickly, unfortunately that is not the case I have found.

    It is literally the lights I used.

    I grow medicine for myself year round legally, and the light in use is metal halide low pressure 6500º K light bulb. I have found that although the light is great for flowering plants, it is not good for starting plants off. Apparently the wave length across the spectrum for flowering bulbs doesn't produce the right wave length and I found the plants dark dark green as if grown in shade.

    So the plants I have caught I was able to provide some shade for outside, but others just had to suck it up and do the best they can. Sadly, the soy I got is nearly completely dead as an example.



    So let my tragedies be an example for you all, start seedlings off with the right lighting!
     
  2. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    the soy may recover if the stems are still green. i've had bean plants eaten several times and they've still come back as long as there was green stem and nodes for sprouts to form. if they are dead all the way down to below the first node then replant immediately.
     
  3. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Paka, it's interesting, because greenhouse panels don't let all the light spectrums through either, mostly because they are trying to make the panels last longer. I had to really research which panels would actually work in my foggy location. They mentioned that plants have a natural sunscreen that they produce, and it looks as though your metal halide lamps put too much blue so they can't form their sunscreen.

    You might put red plastic sheet mulch underneath them, and a sheer curtain over the top (doubled if they are not under dappled shade) so they can spend some time under sunlight with extra red light until they develop their sunscreen. :)
     
  4. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    This guy hasn't been posting lately, but check his work to expand your mind regarding lights a little.

    For those who don't want to trawl through, he uses certain LEDs to light the stem of plants (that's right, the stem) to make them grow a little different.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/HandsOnComplexity/
     
  5. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Metal halide lamps are for flowering, HP Sodium are for growing / starting plants. New starts need some of the red spectrum provided by the HP Sodium lights.
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    You sure about that? From my hydroponic days it was the other way round, blue/green for growth and red/orange for flowering.
     
  7. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    I indeed had that backwards.

    Light is a source of energy and information for plants. It’s needed as energy in photosynthesis and it provides plants critical information about its environment, which the plant needs in order to germinate, grow to a certain size or shape, induce protective substances, flower and when to change from vegatative growth. Plants react to quality, intensity, duration and the direction of light.

    In addition to the light visible to humans (400 nm – 700 nm) plants “see” or use other radiation too. The 400 nm–700 nm wavelength range is called “Photosynthetically Active Radiation” or PAR. Much of the light that plants need is in this range, but for optimal growth result, UV light (280 - 400 nm) and/or far-red light (700-800 nm) might be important. For example far-red is critical for the flowering of many plants. All light is not equal to plants, ie. some areas are more important than others.

    Known photoreceptors are most efficient in the blue and red area of the spectrum. Green plants reflect a significant part of light in the green area of the light spectrum, while absorbing a higher percentage of blue and red light.

    Much research has been conducted regarding the optimal light spectrum of plants. A good description of this is the Relative Quantum Efficiency curve for plants. It considers the photosynthetic rate of the plant (by measuring CO 2 uptake), the energy of light at different wavelengths and the plants absorption of light ie. what stays in the leaf and is not reflected away or transmitted through it. However, producing a plant which is sellable is not only about photosynthesis. Also other aspects like shape, flowering, color of leaves, color of flowers, taste, smell, root development, etc. are important to have a high quality plant.
     

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