Hardiness Zone 2a perennials

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by mekennedy1313, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. mekennedy1313

    mekennedy1313 Junior Member

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    I am embarking on the development of a food forest and am looking for perennials suitable for zone 2a in NE Ontario Canada. Any help identifying suitable options is appreciated. I already have wild roses, blueberries, service berry. I am aware of Haskap and trying to get some.
     
  2. rego

    rego New Member

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    Here are some things known to be extremely cold hardy:
    Siberian pea shrub
    rhus aromatica
    buffalo berry
    bilberry
    cranberry
    honeyberry
    rosa rugosa
    highbush cranberry
    watercress
    jerusalem artichokes
    arctic kiwi (kolomikta)
    Are you familiar with the plants for a future database?
    good luck.
     
  3. mekennedy1313

    mekennedy1313 Junior Member

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    Thanks for the reply

    Thanks for the reply, I should have mentioned I also have Siberian Pea and Highbush Cranberry as well as raspberry. Haskap and Honeyberry is basically the same as I understand it, just different varieties. Rhus aromatica I am not familiar with. I thought the sumacs were toxic. Jerusalem artichokes I have heard of but have no experience with. Have heard both that they are edible and that they are indigestible. Is it a matter of variety, preparation ?? Have also heard of the arctic kiwi, related to gooseberry and currents isn't it? Don't have the water for watercress but it's on the radar for development with an aquaponics scheme. Bilberry is notoriously difficult and so close to the abundant blueberries that grow all around that I'll stick with the blueberry. The silver buffaloberry looks interesting.
     
  4. rego

    rego New Member

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    Jerusalem artichokes grow like crazy. I have had plants give up to 5 kilos. They do make some people fart, but the taste is really good. Here in Denmark they are sold as a gourmet vegetable. You can eat them raw, they have a nice nutty taste and a crunch similar to waterchestnuts. Cooked they turn sweet and make a very fulfilling soup pured and creamed.
    Look up sumac lemonade, I haven't tried it but it looks and sound refreshing.
    The arctic kiwi is a relative of the fuzzy kiwi, not related to gooseberries. It is often sold as an ornamental. But as the male plant flowers most prolifically, he is often the only one to be sold. You will need both sexes to have fruit. The fruit is about the size of a grape and should be sweeter than the ordinary kiwi. You don't have to peel them as the skin is smooth and thin. Mine unfortunately hasn't fruited yet, so I cannot report subjectively on taste.
     
  5. mekennedy1313

    mekennedy1313 Junior Member

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    Ok, regarding the JA, if it's the tuber you harvest and that is what the next years crop comes from as a perennial doesn't that undo the perennial nature? If a plant gives 5 kilo's is that many tubers like a potato and you just leave 1 for each plant next season?
     
  6. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    A detour for the mighty artichoke....
    mekennedy1313, JAs don't store well out of the ground round here and they're usually dug as needed.
    I wonder what the best way to deal with them in frozen ground is?

    in my climate, JAs are basically impossible to get rid of and there's always tubers left in the ground.
    I've just eaten JA and thyme soup, and they are up there as a roast vegetable.
    They have varying effects on people's digetion; I find them a bit farty, but not badly so.
     
  7. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    A friend calls them fartichokes.... Nothing wrong with a friendly sharing of intestinal gas in the family home is there?
     
  8. mekennedy1313

    mekennedy1313 Junior Member

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    Jerusalem Artichoke storage

    Can they be cubed and frozen like other root crops for the winter? How about dried and powdered like flour? Speaking of which could such a flour be used in breads or pancakes?
     
  9. Speedster

    Speedster Junior Member

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    Me i really like a small fruit called (groselle) in French i don't no if its got a deferent name in English just watch out, there is a lot of variety and some just grow in climate which are a bit warmer my favorite kind i don't remember the name but its just a small bush of roughly 3 feet tall and grow some small green fruit the size of wild cheery bot they don't have nut in them and are sweet and really sower but i love them it may be an acquire taste...(its almost the same kind of bush as blue berry) Wile i think of that you could even grow wild cheery i no they are small and get you teeth almost black but... Ho and i am from New Brunwick Canada so i am sure they would grow because its even a bit hotter in Ontario. ( You probably don't live way at the North of Ontario)
     
  10. mekennedy1313

    mekennedy1313 Junior Member

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    Actually I live quite a bit north. I can't find anything on the "groselle" bush, do you have a latin name (ie scientific name). The internet is only coming up with roselle plants. Lots of pin and choke cherry around but unfortunately cherry is the one fruit I detest.
     
  11. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

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    I think the groselle might be the Red Currant? Ribes rubrum
     
  12. mekennedy1313

    mekennedy1313 Junior Member

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    Red currant I am familiar with. Is it the one you quoted or the native one Ribes triste which is more tart. In either case I haven't seen either here, just the skunk currant which is not considered edible. Can I get samples from you? I'm also looking for gooseberries if anyone has in Canada.
     
  13. Speedster

    Speedster Junior Member

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    I am sorry the name was not written properly (Groseille) and i made a bit more researched and in English its apparently called (Gooseberry) but if you check on Wikipedia they don't show the same variety fore the (Groseille) https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groseille and the (Gooseberry) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gooseberry Me i like the small green one at the rite bottom corner in the picture from this link https://fr.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior:Les_fruits/Groseille_verte But you seem too be all ready locking fore it. And by the way -Ludi- is kind of rite its one of the variety but note the one i was tacking about. The one i was tacking about is green and grow in small bush. Ho i just fond i site from Ontario https://www.foodland.gov.on.ca/english/fruits/gooseberries/buy-store-prepare.html Sorry fore any trouble i gave you wit the miss spelling.
     
  14. mekennedy1313

    mekennedy1313 Junior Member

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    Thanks, that is exactly one of the things I am looking for. Now to find them.
     
  15. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Contact FedCo of Maine, USA for a catalog of every perennial they have such as day lilies, apple trees for your climate, Siberian pea shrub and so on. They have a ton of stuff in a handy pdf format so you can search for all kinds of things.
     
  16. Soopolallie

    Soopolallie Junior Member

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    Hello mekennedy, I'm not sure if you wish to wild-source your plants or if you don't mind buying them, but earlier this year I ordered and am having success with some of T&T Nursery's offerings. Their motto is "early in the Arctic, first in you garden". They are based in Manitoba; many of their plants are for zone 2. Their website is sparse right now because it's past the shipping season.

    (Mods, apologies if we aren't supposed to reference commercial sources. I didn't note any prohibition in the user agreement.)
     
  17. Soopolallie

    Soopolallie Junior Member

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    Further thoughts. You were asking about sumac being edible? Starting about an hour's drive from where I live are Rhus glabra, Smooth Sumac, which grows on dry, rocky roadcuts, turning brilliant red in fall, which is when I really notice them. I had the opportunity, a couple of weeks ago, to sample a tea made from its berries. Someone at the Lillooet Farmer's Market had a "Crafting The Wild" table, promoting landscaping with native plants, and her friend had made this tea from whole berry clusters gathered in the fall and hung up to dry over winter. It's nicknamed "Indian Lemonade", and they'd meant to serve it cold, but mine was lukewarm and on that day it was the perfect temperature for me. It has a refreshing taste, which I can best describe as tasting the way that seagrass smells--dried seagrass, the kind they use to make mats sold in Oriental import stores. I'm not sure what its hardiness is. Lillooet is hardiness zone 5, but that doesn't mean hardier plants don't grow there.
     

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