Hallo from south Germany

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself Here' started by Fred, May 12, 2016.

  1. Fred

    Fred New Member

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    Hallo,
    my name equals Fred in english, so I use this as a Nick.
    I live in South Germany, area near Stuttgart. I've been member of the 2014 Online-PDC with Geoff Lawton. So far I am using only little of permaculture knowledge still located in a rather urban area with no land. I take care of a lot what is called Streuobstwiese [meadow with scattered fruit trees] in Germany, where I try to improve the area a little.
    Altough this type is regared as a traditional land use and officals always brag whith theses aereas considering nature preservation permaculture oportunities are quite limited on that land type because of excessive legal restrictions.
    But I hope to find an area where I can implement a more complex permaculture system while I gather some experiences on this area and other minor trial areas.

    so far about me
    Fred
     
  2. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Guten Tag Fred!
    Congratulations on completing your Geoff Lawton PDC! Streuobstwiese sounds a lot like the savannah forest farm that Mark Shepard is working with: https://permacultureapprentice.com/...k-shepard-100-acre-15-years-of-establishment/
    Do you see similarities?
    Are you familiar with Sepp Holzer's work in alpen Austria? He's done significant work with water systems (among other things) that may be applicable to your designs.
    Do you have any photos to post of your Streuobstwiese work?
     
  3. Fred

    Fred New Member

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    Hallo Bill,
    Thank you for your welcome. Mark Sheapards work is by far more sophisticated, than what I do. He makes al living and I get some bags of unfiltered apple juce :). A Streuobstwiese is grass-land with old style fruit trees, that`s it. In my case 1½-rows of about 20 trees on half an acre mostly about 50 years. Only permaculture aspect I`ve started is to add some more species to the undergrow. Some flowers and willow for bees for example. Other main aspect is to do better, more natural tree prunig than before.
    I've added some pictures I hope they give an impression. The crocus are in their second year, I hope they do get prereneal altough some animals are eating from them.
    I've been reading a book from Sepp Holzer but wasn`t able to visit his farm in austria. It's inspirational for me.
     

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  4. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Nice! Thank you. Great crop of apples in your last pic. Do you ever see mushrooms amongst the trees? We are in the process of converting a shrub-steppe grassland into a more forest environment and I've read many times that grassland soil is mainly bacterial while forests live in fungal soil. With our efforts, we are now seeing mushrooms in the spring and autumn ... maybe it's working!
     
  5. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    Bill, funny you should mention that... :)

    https://permaculturenews.org/forums...t-quite-a-plant-the-morel-of-the-story.15083/

    the crocuses here are very much in demand as a food source for
    any herbivore. i have a hard time keeping them from not getting
    raided by either the rabbits or the chipmunks (ground squirrels)
    the later move them around so we can have new plants showing up
    in places we didn't start them.
     
  6. Fred

    Fred New Member

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    Yes, mushrooms/fungi are a importend topic, especially related to fruit trees. I think I remember some mushrooms on the site, but not too much.
    I finding like the morel-story would be highly appreciated *g*.
    Grass and trees are therefore not a very good combination and I hope I can shift this a bit. I've mulched the small trees with wood chips, but still looking for a good source for enough material (also used as a hype heating fuel in germany...), and still looking for good unterplanting plants wich do not interfere too much with the farmer who is cutting the grass.
     
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  7. Fred

    Fred New Member

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    I've been on the "meadow" today. The rain this week did well to the trees, and I've found some mushroom. Looks like from the Coprinus-family. But I'm not sure weather they are a good sign. The appeared close the stems of the weaker pear trees.
     
  8. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    it depends upon the type of fungi as some will happily cohabitate with
    a tree's root system. others are a sign that the tree is damaged and/or
    dying. some fruit trees have a general life-span and after that time they
    can struggle along until a storm or disease takes them out. if they are
    not producing very well and are old it may be a good candidate for
    replacement (and usually it is a good idea to plant some other kind of
    tree there).
     

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