Gypsum

Discussion in 'General chat' started by 4G's, May 12, 2012.

  1. 4G's

    4G's Junior Member

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    Hi,
    Does anyone use gypsum in their veggie garden? My neighbour uses it and the veggies are humungous. It seems too good to be true. Is it natural product?
    R
     
  2. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    It is a naturally mined rock, maybe eveb locally available for you there, and is great for sodic soils.

    What else is you neighbour doing to grow great veges?
     
  3. 4G's

    4G's Junior Member

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    That's all he has added. I have never seen 3.4kg zuch's.
     
  4. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day r,

    yep and heaps and oodles of it, when i feel there might be some acidity around i throw a tad of dolomite into the mix.

    already gone through 3 bags of gypsum on new block, will go through quiet a few more yet, buy the best stuff usually from produce agencies in 25k bags resembles moist talcum powder.

    it's a natural product and zuce's will grow as big as you want them to. not because of teh gypsum alone but from nutrients in the soil which gypsum may help to release.

    len
     
  5. 4G's

    4G's Junior Member

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    thanks len.
    how much did you cover with the 3 bags?
    can you use too much?
     
  6. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Bear in mind that it's a non-renewable resource.
     
  7. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    we used 3 bags to plant around 30 trees and you can't overdose

    as far as sustainable people wont live in sustainable houses and they wont build sustainable houses and they still use the same material gyprock

    len
     
  8. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Occupation:
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    warm temperate - some frost - changing every year
    "Be Content With What You Have And
    May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
    A World That You May Not Understand."
     
  9. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    you don't have a comment of your own purplepear??

    plagiarism just like piggy back theorists.

    we are more that content we build better and are aware of aspects and orientation.

    you missed the message, going for my character.

    pity

    len
     
  10. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    Just wondering, do you do an Emerson test for sodicity before you apply gypsum to new soils?
     
  11. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Agreed when the same results can be done via proper planting, or working with the soil & plant life to make some area less or more base or acid. This would be a good example of why I strongly dislike the supposed "transitive ethic."

    Just because people make unsustainable homes, and materials for them doesn't mean I have to support it or the resources involved with collecting said materials.
     
  12. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    no in our movements around our general area of s.e/qld, we find all clays respond, but should it really matter the clay here dissolves in water, we never use peat, not even sphagnum, the only peat comes in regular potting mixes we use for convenience, don't use any fertilisers or manures either gypsum fill our gap, all our composting and vermiculture occures in the gardens, and prunings are all drop mulched. though no more sustainable than straw baling we use sugar cane mulch and spent mushroom compost, and in preference to burning (oodles of this in rural) we are opting to chop up felled trees for posts and hugelkultur in gardens. so much for the co2 fans hey?

    len
     
  13. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Ah Len - it was indeed your content and not your character that I was "commenting on"
    I am sure you are by now aware that it is environmental vandalism to drag Gypsum from some other place and transport it over goodness knows what distance, using heaven knows how much precious fossil fuel while destroying the habitat of bats and other animals at the location from which it is harvested.
    Organic mater will do the job of floculating the clay content in your soil and though it be slow, we in permaculture use slow solutions as a part of sustainability.
    I say in conclusion the we must "be content with what we have" and not import our success the way we might " find senenity and tranquility" even thoug there are thing in the world that we may not understand.
     
  14. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    so the few gardeners who use gypsum carry the can for all those houses built with gyproc walls?? and farmed wood that grows where once habitat forests grew, all holier than thou stuff hey?? anyhow your debate seems to be going nowhere? as you don't mention those fossil fuels used to create renewable energy components. oh and just to update: with this economic mining boom up here prefab transportable homes (getting to be very wide loads on the highway now) all amde from at least farmed timber transported to brisbane, rockhampton and up around cairns where they build these things then transport them to central qld coal basin. we pass at least 6 every time we do 1/2 hour trip to gympie. so teh whole picture tells teh story, me i've only mentioned part of it.

    and just for interest when a property owner up here is ready to build they have an acre or so or radiata pines in plantation rows which simply get pushed over and burned, millers would rather rape tassy forests for trees to chip, that's 200 year old trees these pines about 40 years old.

    we have lived here 6 months now and on average there would be one fire burning a day.

    len
     
  15. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    perhaps rose could use recycled gypsum

    i often pick up bits at the tip
    gypsum is a good source of sulphur
    what plants are bioaccumulators of S ?,onions
     
  16. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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  17. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    They grow on my plum, and apple trees naturally as well as pretty much everything else here. Some of the species are good bandages in case of cuts and lacerations, & edible.
     
  18. hondo

    hondo Junior Member

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    I add both organic material and gypsum to the heavy clay soil in my garden. The combination of the two has seriously changed the composition of my garden soil and highly improved my yields and quality of my produce.
     
  19. hondo

    hondo Junior Member

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    Any idea!
     
  20. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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