growing sweet spuds in pots

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by gardenlen, Oct 8, 2012.

  1. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Indeed, I have been a big promoter of the use of mycorrhizal fungi for the last four decades, I have yet to find any down side to introducing them to soils. I have even used them to clean up oil saturated lands, it took two years on one area that had oil saturation to a depth of 1.5 feet. When the fungi had had enough time, the soil tested nearly clear of any pollution and it produced really good vegetables. Prior to the treatments this land would grow nothing.
     
  2. Mysterious

    Mysterious Junior Member

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    Thanks for the responses - this is making much more sense to me now. More often than not the answer lies in having good healthy soil!
     
  3. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Mysterious, I think you just said the best signature line I've seen!

    "More often than not the answer lies in having good healthy soil!"
     
  4. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    I found one, people are starting to go to ancient woodlands of Alaska and tropical rainforests and selling off the humus for this very reason.

    https://www.groworganic.com/peaceful-valley-arctic-humus-54-cubic-feet-bulk.html

    So how do you ethically remove the humus layer from a forest floor?

    by the by, I'm doing a top down method of reintroducing the fungi aspect of soil to the 1st food forest area. This year I scavenged umpteen bags of leaves, and twigs from all sorts of trees, grapes and other woody stems. I have even taken all the bark from splitting wood back to this area and just literally threw it around in random places. Naturally I have other things then just fruit / nut trees in this small area, but no N fixers yet. I have put down several mushroom inoculated logs in a "V" pattern to catch nutrients around some trees as well. When the N fixers come in sometime this year I suspect even more grass will be replaced by more forest oriented plants. I even have a small Stumpery going in this area.

    In seasons past, I have had planted random groups of worms like one of the people Bill Mollison visited in the Global Gardener. Lastly, being on a ridge, I have the compost pile uphill from the food forest area only a few vertical inches which seems to be more then enough to have a positive impact already on the trees, be it cold (winter) or summer (Berkeley Method) compost.

    Lastly, I often throw out the Oyster mushroom (or others we cook) scraps from cooking them in this area. Eventually I will stop and start putting them in the compost also.

    If I had the proper equipment, I would go out trekking and collect various mushrooms and fungi with someone in the know, make spore prints, and then inocculate the whole area some how, maybe via wood chips or sawdust, but that is in the future.
     
  5. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Thank you for posting that link, and yes that is unethical to remove that much humus from a forest floor. I'm going to have to contact Peaceful Valley and see if they know how that stuff is made and where it comes from, the price seems to be so high that I doubt they sell much of it.

    If you are collecting fungi for the purpose of soil inoculation, If they grow on wood (decomposers), they probably are good to use for soil inoculation. Another good way to find the right kinds is to simply pull back the humus layer, gently looking for those white threads that tell us we have found what we are looking for, removing just one leaf with these threads, putting that in a bag of growing medium and letting it go for a few weeks, will give you enough to start spreading it around and reserve some to continue the grow it plant it cycle. I do that with spent oyster medium, I separate it into many bags of growing medium, once it has taken off, I have enough to plant and also grow more oysters for us. I also have lions mane that I do the same process with.
     
  6. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    After contacting Peaceful Valley, the Alaska Humus they are selling is not collected from the wild, it is made by a compost company for them. This was good news to me, at least they aren't supporting the pillaging of Earth Mother. I was impressed by these folks, they are promoting organic growing by all and seem to be very conscious of impacting our Earth Mother in good ways.
     
  7. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    That is good to know, they are an important supplier to me. However, I have found many instances at my Grange of similar materials so I am hesitant when it comes to humus. Your way above with the Oyster & other mycellium sounds more my speed.
     
  8. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    I'm with you there Pakanohida. It is my belief that importation of any humus, compost or other amendments should only be done when there is simply no way to create it on the site. Certain things, such as calcium, sulfur, etc. amendments would by necessity need to be purchased but when it comes to the actual organic components they are better if produced from "left overs" on the site, this way you are completing the circle of life just a our Earth Mother does.
     

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