growing purslane

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by sindhooram, Dec 28, 2010.

  1. sindhooram

    sindhooram Junior Member

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    Hi, I tried to grow some purslane on my roof garden. I planted it in a deep tray. I thought that would be OK as I get reasonable lettuces like that and purslane is supposed to be shallow rooted.
    I was a bit disappointed as it only grew to quite a small size with small leaves, flowered and died all in about one month.
    can anyone tell me what the life cycle of purslane should be and how it normally looks / behaves? I understand as it is normally a weed it should be quite easy. It may have happened like that because we had a lot of rain (although it was half under shelter but wouldnt have got much sun)....I have now replanted in deeper container but would like to know how it should be. Do you normally pick the whole plant to eat or just the leaves?

    many thanks!!
     
  2. Fernando Pessoa

    Fernando Pessoa Junior Member

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    It performs best in my climate(sub trops) with 4 hours of full sun then some arvo shade.I have always had it as you said a weed,try it in a sandy soil and gravel mix with about 50% compost you should get a result.The more sun it gets the thinner the leaves too little and it grows slowly.It goes to flower as a result of stress or non ideal conditions very quickly,I would suggest you play around with it until you find a happy medium.
    Best wishes Fernando.
    Also in regards to your compost question,yes its good enough alone if well made etc etc.
    Compost is a soil food and liquid manure is a plant food.
    I use liquid brews after heavy rains just combat leaching but well made composts are usually enough.This is a good all round article on composts.
    Best wishes again
    Fernando
    https://www.recycledorganics.com/rolibrary/resources/5_product/5_04_06.pdf
     
  3. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    I bought some seeds and planted out in the subtropics I now have it all over the place,it does like pot plants and and disturbed soil in the veggie garden.It almost disappears in the dry season and then springs from everywhere in the rain.

    My dad had heaps of it growing wild in his veggie garden in Melbourne so it seems to like a few different climates.
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    And you just eat the leaves and leave to plant to keep growing.
     
  5. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    I just throw a few in the salad at the last minute as the pots are near my table
     
  6. Fernando Pessoa

    Fernando Pessoa Junior Member

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    Purslane just happens to contain alpha-linolenic acid, one of the highly sought-after Omega-3 fatty acids. Why pay money for fish oil when you can grow your own Omega-3 fatty acids.
    Cheap and cheerful huh...it's a must
     
  7. Fernando Pessoa

    Fernando Pessoa Junior Member

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    P. oleracea contains many biologically active compounds and is a source of many nutrients. Some of the biologically active (and, in some case, potentially toxic compounds) include free oxalic acids, alkaloids, omega-3 fatty acids, coumarins, flavonoids, cardiac glycosides, and anthraquinone glycosides. It has high contents of Omega-3 fatty acids and protein (compared to other vegetables) (Ezekwe, et al. 1999). The quantity of these compounds in P. oleracea varies with the growing conditions (e.g., planting date, soil quality, fertilization) and the age of the plant.
    It just gets better and better,looks like its an everything in moderation job.
    The link is thanks to MA,thanks Mahttp:
    //www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/medicinal/portula.html
     
  8. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    Good for the chooks and sheep too

    https://www.naturalhub.com/natural_food_guide_meat_common.htm
     
  9. sindhooram

    sindhooram Junior Member

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    I think it may have been all the rain that stressed my first attempts - i used a soil mix similar to what Fernando suggested . I hope they will do better now and I'm going to try putting some in the garden too although i only have a little cultivated space left and our normal garden soil will only grow bonsai plants....would they make an OK ground cover around other plants such as tomatoes?
     
  10. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    Mine comes up wild around my tomatoes in a pot and around my chillies in a pot. It must be in the potting mix now.
    I had some come up in an old sea grass door mat.
    Once you get it started it should come up everywhere.
     

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