Growing non-hybrid fruit tree's - from seed

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Paul Darrington, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Thanks TFF and seed savers,
    I usually use an envelope of Hort. vermiculite for most seeds on top of potting mix. It is usually successful for most stuff.

    Cherry, Peach, and Plum (Prunus species)
    https://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/hortnews/2000/8-11-2000/germtreeseed.html

    https://www.helpfulgardener.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=8318
     
  2. FingerLime

    FingerLime Junior Member

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    Hi !

    ALL fruit sorts of now, who are grafted on rootstocks one were a seedling.
    Most of the time not the result of asystematic breeding process, but just a lost seed somewhere in a corner or any place that nobody cared.
    Then when bearing fruits, it became an sensation and comqueered the world.
    So that is what you get on seedlings ...

    Here in europe traditionally farmer grow their trees themselves.
    They just grew seeds all the times.
    If the result was good, and there was a broad sense of good, they planted it.
    The goodness they looked for was not only big, tasty and large amounts of fruits, but also hardyness against frost and drought, bugs and deseases.
    All together a solid relieable harvest was the most important, for they lived from it and a lost harvest could result in their death.
    The trees, that did not pass the judjing of being good were grafted.
    So you got trees that were grafted on own seedlings, which made very strong, adapted on local soil and climate trees.
    In my country we have thousands of trees that are older than 200 years and hundreds that are over 400 years.

    Tropical forest, we just plant them in autumn into soil, like 6 cm deep.
    Next spring they will grow.
    yes, you can break the germinate brake by chilling, but the natural way is better.
     
  3. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Thanks paul helpful post
    All most all sweet oranges, all true grapefruit, lemons, limes, mandarins (other than the varieties Clementine and King), most all tangelos, hybrid tangerines and tangors (except the variety Temple) will come true from seed. In other words, the seed will produce a tree identical to the mother tree which produced the fruit.Note that it will take 7-9 years before the seedling will start to produce fruit. Grow the seedling in a fast draining soil, and water only when the top inch or two becomes dry
    Mandarins are an excellent variety of citrus to grow from seed, and a good variety to be grown as a container tree
    https://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=34974
     
  4. WAA WAA

    WAA WAA New Member

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    helpful post.
     
  5. beginnergardener

    beginnergardener Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Which ones will grow well from seed in a warm temperate climate but not reach a height of more than about 4m?
     

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