Growing a Forest

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Roedeer, Nov 16, 2016.

  1. Roedeer

    Roedeer New Member

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    Hello! I am a highschool student in San Diego. I joined because my friends and I are interested in making a forest. We want to make a fruit bearing forest that will eventually be self-sustaining. We went to our principal and got his stamp of approval, and is interested in helping us make this happen. Unfortunately, we have no idea how it is going to happen. Which is why I joined this group. The first thing we have to do is get the land needed. That is probably one of the hardest parts. While we are doing that, we need to find trees that are suited to our environment. After we get the land we will have to do the back-breaking (hopefully not literally) work of digging the land we need. And making the dirt and planting the trees. But we don't know how to do that. And that's why I joined! Thank you for reading this and please give any hints and links to threads that are helpful!

    We currently have 7 members (Not including adults) that want to do this and we think a lot more will be willing to help out. Yeah, we have a lot of good trees in our area. Some of the native trees are oak trees, acacia, cedar, western redbud, crape myrtle, lemon bottlebrush and a lot more! We already have a few trees that we definitely want to add like most of the ones above, but we also want to add royal purple smoke trees, peach trees, nectarines, pomegranates, avocados, pluots, figs, and some non-native threes but are suited to our environment like loquats, lychees, macadamia nut trees, and even walnuts! Of course, we won't be able to get most of these, but we can hope. Unfortunately, we don't have much room in our backyards and our parents aren't exactly willing to grow a forest in our backyard even if it is a fruit and nut bearing forest. And if we do everything correctly, the forest will be self-sustaining in 3-4 years. This is all a little far-fetched, but we will be able to do at least a little of what I said above. The adults are working to find a place to grow the forest, and we are working on fundraising so we can pay for the tools, water, trees, and dirt, mulch, etc. . .
     
  2. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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  3. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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  4. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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