greetings

Discussion in 'General chat' started by spirited, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. spirited

    spirited Junior Member

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    Hi all fellow permies,
    Just joined this forum and thought I would say hello. I've been a permaculture devotee & practitioner for about 17 years. Did my PDC with David Holmgren in 1992.

    I live on a couple of acres in a very small rural town in the mid north of South Australia. I've been slowly developing the property since coming here about 8 years ago. I've planted several 100's of trees for all sorts of purposes.

    Did a mob of earthworks last year, establishing a water catchment system interconnected with swales. As the holes are unlined it doesn't retain water all the time but even the effect of the greater catchment on the ground moisture & subsequent growth of plants downslope is already visible within a few months of the systems installation. As the trees grow and create shade over the water holes the evaporation will be less so perhaps there will be water in at least the biggest hole throughout the year. Time will tell.

    It's pretty few & far between visits or contact with other likeminded people in these parts. I have a general open house policy for all permies, so if you're travelling in the area between the Clare valley & Southern Flinders ranges contact me. There's a cuppa & a good chat waiting!

    For the Earth,
    Susan
     
  2. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: greetings

    Greetings Earhling Susan
    Yours sounds like a wonderful place.
    I hope you have an Truffle-Oak (Oak-truffle?) tucked away in a spare 1/4 acre?

    I have been sorely tempted of late to come to see how much water is in Lake Aire.
    It may not happen again in my lifetime.

    On the way, it would also be interesting to see what 200mm of rain did to Broken Hill.
    I would love to know more about desert ecology and plants.
     
  3. spirited

    spirited Junior Member

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    Re: greetings

    Thanks for your welcome.
    What's a truffle oak? I don't have any oaks presently though I hope the acorns I planted in a pot germinate. The annual rainfall here is around 450mm so perhaps not really suitable for many european trees. It's a lot better than where I used to live though. In Mannum we only had 300mm annually.
    Let me know if you head over to see Lake Eyre or Broken Hill. It may be possible to meet somewhere along your journey. Always looking to make new like minded friends.
     
  4. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Re: greetings

    Welcome Susan,

    I had the priviledge of being in your area about 6 weeks ago on my way from the NT to top of Victoria.

    Michaelangelica, I was also in Broken Hill about 4 weeks ago and certainly spent a lot of time in area between broken hill and mildura. A favourite region of mine. I travelled back to the NT via Echuca, West Wyalong, Wellington, Gunnedah, Moree, St George etc etc.

    Between Barcaldine and Ilfracombe the sides of the road looked like mowed lawn, amazing rainfall thru that region all the way to Julia Creek and then on the NT border the Diamantina/Georgina Rivers had massive rain which also eventually drain into lake eyre. I am tempted to head back down that way in August and maybe take a charter out of Broken Hill and fly over Lake Eyre. It is a possibility.

    cheers,
     
  5. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: greetings

    O dear ho hum sounds very tempting; never really seen the outback but interested in plants of all regions. How do hich hikers go out there? (die slowly?)
    Aparently there are planes and boat charters to take you over Lake Aire which sounds vast

    susan,
    I have only tasted black truffles a few times at a little French Restauirant in Bexley NSW (!!) a lifetime ago. After tasting them I reseached how to grow them. They are worth their weight in gold.
    BUT
    1. Fist grow you Oak tree.
    So I didn't go on-- too impatient.
    I could be eating my own truffles now.
    Truffles are an edible fungus that grows on the roots of the Oak. Someone has got it together over your way and you can buy oak trees with the truffle spore now;
    also in tassie and other places. There are also native truffles too; i don't know anything about these.
    I was making the suggestion a bit tounge-in-cheek, but Mediterannean Climates are ideal for them apparently
     
  6. teela

    teela Junior Member

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    Re: greetings

    Hello and welcome Susan from another SA person (and there aint many of us in here).
    I used to live in the Riverland so I know what you mean about the 300mm rainfall and the frustration that goes with such low rainfall....all we seemed to grow were cacti, succulents and local native plants. Some south african plants did well though....peppercorn trees ect. What didn't die from severe frost was sizzled in the heat and dry. We spent alot of time in good old Mannum too. Now we live in Mt Gambier........better rainfall, cooler. I love the Murray River but sad that it's dying :( or should I say being murdered.
    CYA
     
  7. spirited

    spirited Junior Member

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    Re: greetings

    Thanks for your welcome Teela. Nice to meet another SA resident even if we are vast distances apart.

    Yes, the river really is in a sorry state! For at least the last 15 years it's been predicted that the Murray would be unpotable in 20 years....from then. That leaves us only 5 years and I don't see enough positive change happening to make a difference. When I lived in Mannum I was part of the Caloote Area Landcare Group (CALG) which did some really excellent conservation & revegetation work in the locality (which extended right out to Purnong.) One year our group planted around 100 000 trees and several kilometres of direct seeding as well as fenced off some significant areas of native mallee scrubland. Sadly, our meagre efforts are not enough to make much difference in the scheme of things.

    I still believe (and act on my belief) that the most important work we can do is build soil & plant trees. Ultimately this is the solution to all of the world's environmental (and associated) problems.
     

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