Green stringy algae - Suggestions for reduction

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by vix, Jan 11, 2004.

  1. vix

    vix Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2002
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hey all,
    The pond is question is about 4 metres across and 1.-2 m deep. It has lilys in it, fish and tuart trees around and above it.
    It also has green algae, as is often seen in brightly lit ponds. Is it also too much nutrient? Nothing goes in it that doesn't live in there or fall in...
    I seem to remember too there was some way to clean plants that came out of such water so that the algae doesn't get spread by plant matter moving around. It was something you'd soak the plant in to wash stuff off the roots.
    cheers
     
  2. Jeff Nugent

    Jeff Nugent Junior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2003
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Using the water from the pond to put on plants while replacing the water with fresh water from the tap will reduce the nutrient, oxygenate the water (especially if it's topped using a spray jet), and add nutrient rich water to the garden. Win, win!
    Cheers, Jeff
     
  3. Veggie Boy

    Veggie Boy Junior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Messages:
    410
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Can't remember how much nitrogen is available from algae like this, but I know it is considerable. I have considerred producing some shallow water holding structures for the purpose of producing algae for fertiliser, though decided its too much of an eyesore and have moved towards legume green manure crops, comfrey and the chooks (to name a few) to meet my nitrogen needs. Having said that, if the algae is there, why not use it.
     
  4. Guest

    A couple of additional thoughts come to mind...

    it's obvious you have excess nutrients...would it be possible to shunt them into something more useful, such as duckweed (at least here in the Western US). It's very high protein, grows madly, and is good chicken feed

    barley straw in a pond is reputed to reduce the greens...not sure of the mechanism, or if it leaves yucchy rotten barley straw dregs in the pond when it's done, but it's worth thinking about.

    cheers

    Rich
     
  5. Guest

    I have this problem in my pond also. Someone suggested bicarb-soda. (baking powder) I tried that, and it made no difference at all. I am thinking about some kind of commercial algicide... The nutrients probably ome from my water lilly pots, but I want to keep them!
     
  6. Mont

    Mont Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2002
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This is from a book called Success With Miniature Ponds: 'The dreaded filamentous algae that creates a cottonwool-like, green web of fine, thin fibres, thrives in water with a high ph containing lime. A ph value of 6 will ensure that it doesn't become a problem, particularly if the water is also poor in nutrients. Inserting a little barley straw is a good way of combatting this invader. When the straw begins to decompose, substances are released that kill the algae, on the one hand, and on the other hand, encourage healthy growth of water plants. You can't simply throw the barley straw in the pond. Take a handful and place it in a fist-sized gauze pouch that should be placed at the bottom of the trough, preferably weighted or covered with something. The effect will only be noticeable after a few weeks, when the straw starts decomposing, but may last up to nine months after that. In the transitional period you should fish out larger colonies of the algae with a stick or fork. Recently, tablets made of decomposed straw have become available in the garden trade'.
     

Share This Page

-->